nanoscience, nanotechnology & beyond - M.MOAM.INFO (2024)

Aug 21, 2018 - polymorphism and combined MIR-FIR/THz spectral library. ...... J. Askim,. S. Semancik. ANYL 162. Real-time biosensor capable of quantifying...

2018

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY National Meeting & Exposition

Aug. 19–23

Boston I MA

PROGRAM BOOK

#ACSBoston

WELCOME

Welcome Letter from ACS President..........................................................4 Presidential Symposia and Events...............................................................5 Welcome Letter from Thematic Chair........................................................6 Opening Session & Welcome Reception................................................... 7 Welcome Letter from Mayor..........................................................................8 Welcome Letter from GBCVB........................................................................9 GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION ACS Operations Offices............................................................................................... 13

ACS Specialty Offices..................................................................................... 14 Attendee Resources........................................................................................ 14 Meeting Policies.................................................................................................15 Registration Information................................................................................ 16 Conduct Policy...................................................................................................17

ACCOMMODATIONS & TRAVELING TO MEETING LOCATIONS

Accommodations............................................................................................. 19 Traveling to Meeting Venues........................................................................ 19 Campus Map...................................................................................................... 20

STUDENT & EDUCATOR ACTIVITIES

Student Program..............................................................................................23

CAREER NAVIGATOR

ACS Career Pathways™ Workshops.......................................................... 25 ACS Professional Education Short Courses.......................................... 25 2018 ACS Leadership Development System Course Offerings..... 25

EXPO & CAREER FAIR HIGHLIGHTS

Exhibitor Workshops...................................................................................... 27

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

ACS Board of Directors 2018...................................................................... 29 Board & Council Meetings............................................................................ 30 Committee Meetings....................................................................................... 31

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS......................................................................... 34 TICKETED SOCIAL & SPECIAL EVENTS............................................................................ 41 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & APPRECIATION..................................................................... 42 WORKSHOPS............................................................................................................................... 45 EXHIBITOR LIST.......................................................................................................................... 46 TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY.....................................................................................52 TECHNICAL PROGRAM........................................................................................................... 70 AUTHORS INDEX..................................................................................................................... 254

WELCOME

Table of Contents

VISIT THE ACS EXPOSITION & CAREER FAIR! HALL A, BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER

THE NEWLY DESIGNED ACS EXPO FLOOR HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. • Visit over 250 companies • Attend exhibitor workshops and demonstrations • Network, charge devices, and get social in the Recharge & Social Media Lounge • Visit with recruiters from top companies and hear exciting, lightning-fast presentations at the Career Fair Welcome Reception & Poster Sessions Sunday, August 19 I 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM Expo & Career Fair Hours Visit over 250 companies and learn Monday, August 20 I 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM Tuesday, August 21 I 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM Caffeinate & Communicate! Coffee Breaks Monday, August 20 I 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Tuesday, August 21 I 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM Meet the ACS President-Elect Candidates Monday, August 20 I 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

PETER K. DORHOUT I President BONNIE A. CHARPENTIER I President Elect ALLISON A. CAMPBELL I Immediate Past President JOHN E. ADAMS I Chair, Board of Directors THOMAS M. CONNELLY I Executive Director & CEO FLINT H. LEWIS I Secretary & General Counsel BRIAN A. BERNSTEIN I Treasurer & CFO

WELCOME

ACS OFFICERS

American Chemical Society 1155 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036 TEL I 800-227-5558 (US only) 04 202-872-4600 FAX I 202-872-4615 EMAIL I [emailprotected] WEBSITE I www.acs.org The American Chemical Society is a self-governed individual membership organization of members at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry. The Society provides a broad range of opportunities for peer interaction and career development, regardless of professional or scientific interests. The programs and activities conducted by ACS today are the products of a tradition of excellence in meeting member needs that dates from the Society’s founding in 1876. The American Chemical Society publishes this meeting program as a service to its attendees. Information contained herein is subject to change without notice. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, ACS makes no warranties, expressed or implied, related to the information. For the official technical program for the 256th National Meeting & Exposition, refer to the ACS Meetings & Events Mobile App.

3

WELCOME

Welcome Message from Peter K. Dorhout ACS PRESIDENT Welcome to Boston, and the site of the 256th ACS National Meeting. It is my pleasure to welcome all of you to this beautiful and historic city. Coming here, you join thousands of presenters and attendees to network, learn, and share your science with colleagues as well as welcome new members to your professional community. With the meeting theme of “Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond,” there are bound to be symposia that pique your interests. On Sunday, I hope you are able to attend the Presidential symposium Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward. As many of you know, the safe practice of chemistry is a passion of mine, and I welcome the opportunity to bring even greater focus to this core value of ACS. On Monday, there are several Presidential symposia: Growing with Project SEED, Ion Transport at the Nanoscale, and a symposium organized by the Environmental Division — Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science. Join your colleagues later that evening at the Graduate Education Advisory Postdoctoral Reception, featuring science cartoonist Jorge Cham. On Monday at noon, join your colleagues at the ACS Board of Directors Regular Session featuring Nobel Laureate Sir Fraser Stoddart. Later that afternoon, Jill Millstone from the University of Pittsburgh will present the Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture on Metal-Ligand Chemistry in Nanoparticle Synthesis and Performance. Following her presentation, Harry Atwater of the California Institute of Technology will give the Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture on Light as Fuel. On Monday afternoon, we will honor and recognize the outstanding accomplishments of our 2018 class of ACS Fellows. Along with the rich technical program, there are a myriad of career development programs for undergraduate and graduate students, postdocs, and chemical professionals. The career fair will provide opportunities for on-site interviews, one-on-one career assistance, and career-related workshops. Don’t forget to stop by the exposition hall featuring several hundred companies showcasing services, instruments, books, and lab equipment. In closing, I’d like to ensure everyone has safety on their mind as they travel and participate in this enormous gathering. Each of us has the responsibility to continue to instill a culture of safety — for ourselves and our colleagues. If you notice an unsafe situation, please take the time to bring it to the attention of someone in the Convention Center or your hotel. I know this will be a tremendously successful meeting, and I thank you all for your contributions. My personal thanks go to our hosts at the Northeastern Section, and the divisional program chairs and symposium chairs responsible for organizing the technical sessions.

PETER K. DORHOUT ACS President

4

2018

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND

PRESIDENTIAL SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY National Meeting & Exposition

Aug. A ug.. 19–23 ug

Boston I MA

acs.org/NationalMeeting

Sponsored and Recommended by the ACS President

Photo: Peter Cutts Photography

256th ACS National Meeting • Boston, MA • August 19-23, 2018

Peter K. Dorhout, Ph.D. ACS President

SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 2018 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Presidential Outreach Event: ACS Kids Zone – Exploring Our World Through Chemistry [Cosponsored by CCA] (Boston Children’s Museum - 308 Congress Street, Boston, MA)

MONDAY, AUGUST 20, 2018 8:00 am - 4:35 pm Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research and Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers [Cosponsored by ANYL, CHAS, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC & SCHB] Boston Convention & Exhibition Center - Room 103 (Meeting Level 1)

8:30 am - 11:30 am Growing with Project SEED: 50 Years and 10,000+ Students [Cosponsored by SEED, AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CHAS, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF, SCHB, SOCED, WCC & YCC] Sheraton Boston Hotel - Back Bay D (2nd Floor)

8:30 am - 5:00 pm Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science [Sponsored by ENVR and Cosponsored by PRES]

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2018

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center - Room 257 B (Meeting Level 2)

8:30 am - 3:30 pm Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward [Cosponsored by

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Graduate and Postdoctoral Scholars Lecture & Reception – Featuring Cartoonist Jorge Cham

AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CHAS, CCS, CINF, CPT, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF, SCHB, WCC & YCC]

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center - Ballroom West (Ballroom Level 3)

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center - Room 103 (Meeting Level 1)

OTHER SYMPOSIA RECOMMENDED BY THE ACS PRESIDENT SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2018

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2018

1:00 pm - 3:35 pm Chemistry as a Second Language: Strategies for Global Scientific Communication [Sponsored by YCC and Cosponsored by PRES and IAC]

8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Advances in Human Space Exploration: Second ACS NASA Symposium [Sponsored by POLY and Cosponsored by PRES]

Westin Boston Waterfront - Marina Ballroom II (Lobby Level)

Westin Boston Waterfront - Grand Ballroom D (Concourse Level); Grand Ballroom A (4:00 pm - 6:00 pm)

1:30 pm - 3:15 pm Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in Honor of Barbara Belmont [Sponsored by PROF and Cosponsored by PRES, CMA & WCC] Aloft Boston Seaport - Mann 1/2 (First Floor)

MONDAY, AUGUST 20, 2018 9:00 am - 12:05 pm Artificial Intelligence and Its Impact on the Chemical Enterprise [Sponsored by YCC and Cosponsored by PRES] Westin Boston Waterfront - Marina Ballroom II (Lobby Level)

1:30 pm - 4:30 pm Celebrating the Success of an Exchange Program for German & American Chemistry Students [Sponsored by CHED and Cosponsored by PRES, IAC, YCC, ACS Northeastern Local Section, and the German Chemical Society] Seaport Hotel & World Trade Center - Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B (Ground Floor - Harbor Level)

1:30 pm - 4:45 pm The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research and the BRAIN Initiative [Sponsored by MPPG and the Kavli Foundation, and Cosponsored by PRES] Boston Convention & Exhibition Center - Room 103 (Meeting Level 1)

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm LGBTQ+ Presidential Reception Sheraton Boston Hotel - Back Bay B (2nd Floor)

WELCOME

Welcome Message from Paul S. Weiss BOSTON THEMATIC CHAIR The 256th ACS National Meeting (Boston, August 19–23) will showcase topics on Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond. The opening session on Sunday, August 19, will inaugurate the theme “Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond” with a lecture presented by Dr. Leroy Hood, founding director of the Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, Washington, and chief science officer of Providence St. Joseph Health, entitled “Opportunities for Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, & Chemistry in the Future of Medicine.” On Monday, August 20, the Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture will be delivered by Dr. Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology, founding editor-in-chief of ACS Photonics. His lecture, entitled “Light as Fuel,” will address challenges in using light to generate chemical fuels. It will be coupled with the Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture, delivered by ACS Nano associate editor Prof. Jill Millstone, University of Pittsburgh, on her fascinating work on metal-ligand chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis and performance. You won’t want to miss it! ACS divisions worked to create an amazing program that highlights nanoscience. Twenty divisions are offering more than 90 symposia related to the theme. In addition, our Multidisciplinary Planning Group MPPG, partner divisions, and ACS journal editors added 12 symposia on the theme. Some of the highlights of those symposia include the following: Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy: Stanislaus Wong (SUNY Stony Brook), Hongjin Fan (Nanyang Technological University), and Mato Knez (NanoGUNE Cooperative Research Center). Nanostructured Materials for Energy Harvesting & Storage: Jinsong Huang (UNC), Marina Leite (University of Maryland), and Matthew McDowell (Georgia Tech). Nano in Tissue Engineering: Molly Stevens (Imperial College London) and Ali Khademhosseini (UCLA). The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative: Jonathan Sweedler (University of Illinois) Nanophotonics: Jason Hafner (Rice), Naomi Halas (Rice), and Peter Nordlander (Rice). New Advances in 3D Nanoprinting: Alireza Khademhosseini (MIT) and Gang yu Liu (UC Davis). We look forward to seeing you there!

PAUL S. WEISS, UCLA and ACS Nano Thematic Program Chair

6

2018

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY National Meeting & Exposition

Aug. 19–23

Boston I MA

OPENING SESSION MODERATED BY PAUL WEISS Boston 2018 Thematic Organizer Sunday, August 19, 2018 I 4:00 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center — Ballroom West 21st Century Medicine Will Transform Healthcare: Opportunities for Nanoscience and Chemistry LEROY HOOD — Institute for Systems Biology

WELCOME RECEPTION IN THE EXPO & CAREER FAIR Sunday, August 19, 2018 I 5:30 – 7:30 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center — Hall A

MPPG SPONSORED THEMATIC PROGRAMMING Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy* Sunday, August 19, and Monday, August 20 Organizers: Hongjin Fan, Mato Knez Presider: Stanislaus Wong Nanostructured Materials for Energy Harvesting & Storage Sunday, August 19 Organizers: Jinsong Huang, Marina Leite, Matthew McDowell Nano in Tissue Engineering Tuesday, August 21 Organizers: Alireza Khademhosseini, Molly Stevens The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative** Tuesday, August 21 Organizer: Jonathan Sweedler Nanophotonics Tuesday, August 21, and Wednesday, August 22 Organizers: Jason Hafner, Naomi Halas, Peter Nordlander New Advances in 3D Nanoprinting Thursday, August 23 Organizers: Alireza Khademhosseini, Gang-Yu Liu *Co-sponsored by the Division of Inorganic Chemistry (INOR) I ** Sponsored by the Kavli Foundation

WELCOME

CITY OF BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS OFFICE OF THE MAYOR MARTIN J. WALSH

August 19, 2018 Dear Friends, On behalf of the City of Boston, it is my honor to welcome you to the American Chemical Society's national meeting. Thank you for choosing the City of Boston for this important occasion to network among leading professionals in your field and learn the best practices in your industry. While you are here, take some time to relax and explore the city. Dine in our incomparable restaurants; enjoy some of the great history our city has to offer. Please tour our historic neighborhoods like Beacon Hill and our national landmarks such as Faneuil Hall, and the Old State House. From shopping on Newbury Street, to kayaking on the Charles River, I am sure you will enjoy your stay in the City of Boston. Best wishes for an enjoyable event and many more successes in the years to come.

Sincerely, Martin J. Walsh Mayor of Boston

BOSTON CITY HALL • ONE CITY HALL SQUARE • BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS • 02201 617-635-4500 • www.boston.gov PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER •

8

WELCOME

GREATER BOSTON CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

August 17, 2018 Dear Attendees August 17, 2018of the American Chemical Society, On behalf of the Greater BostonChemical Convention & Visitor Bureau (GBCVB), it is my pleasure to Dear Attendees of the American Society, welcome the American Chemical Society (ACS) to Boston for the ACS National Meeting & Expo. We Ondelighted behalf of the Greater are to have youBoston here.Convention & Visitor Bureau (GBCVB), it is my pleasure to welcome the American Chemical Society (ACS) to Boston for the ACS National Meeting & Expo. We are delighted to have you Boston is ahere. cosmopolitan city, bustling with innovators and entrepreneurs,global financial and

business leaders, alongside students and tourists from every corner of the globe. Our culinary Boston is a cosmopolitan city, bustling with innovators and entrepreneurs, global financial and business scene is diverse and distinguished, where regionally sourced seafood and farm-to-table offerings leaders, alongside students and tourists from every corner of the globe. Our culinary scene is diverse blend seamlessly eclectic ethnic cuisines. Boston's rich tableau of public art,seamlessly immersivewith and distinguished,with where regionally sourced seafood and farm-to-table offerings blend festivals, iconic cuisines. museums and award-winning companies provide iconic entertainment eclectic ethnic Boston’s rich tableau of theater public art, immersive festivals, museums, and and cultural opportunities meet provide every preference. Please take advantage of your award-winning theater that companies entertainment and cultural opportunities that time meet with every us preference. takeinadvantage your timepremier with us and immerse yourself in one of theconventions. region’s destinations for meetings and and immersePlease yourself one of theofregion's premier destinations for meetings and conventions.

The South BostonWaterfront -also known as the Seaport District -will be your center of The South Boston Waterfront - also known as the Seaport - will be your of activity. The activity . The Seaport is an evolving neighborhood andDistrict its transformati oncenter over the last decade Seaport is an evolving neighborhood and its transformation over the last decade continues. Anchored by continues. Anchored by the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center development continues the Boston projects Convention and Exhibition Center development continues at a blistering pace - with atmore a blistering pace - with more than $4.5 billion in projects inthe pipeline. than $4.5 billion in in the pipeline. The ACS National Meeting & Expo will make its own mark on our city, and we welcome you to join andMeeting contribute to itwill as make well. its Again, the Bureau is here withyou all to your Theour ACSstory National & Expo own mark on our city, andto weassist welcome joinneeds our and please enjoy your in Boston. story and contribute totime it as well. Again, the Bureau is here to assist with all your needs and please enjoy your time in Boston. Pat Moscaritolo

Pat Moscaritolo

PaPat t MoscarIMoscaritolo tolo President President&&CEO CEO GBCVB GBCVB

9

The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society

GAC, WCC, and NYSCC at the January 2017 monthly meeting

German Exchange Group in Frankfurt

NESACS Education Night Avery Ashdown High School Chemistry Examination Contest Awardees

warmly welcomes you to Boston!

2016 Richards Medal winner Dr. Gabor Somorjai, Mrs. Somorjai and committee

At Museum of Science for 2017 National Chemistry Week

December 2017 Medicinal Chemistry Symposium Speakers and Organizers

Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences Designed for your success • Practical research experiences and industry connections • Six specialized concentrations for theoretical and technical expertise • Access to state-of-the-art Singh Center for Nanotechnology Visit our booth and discover how Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences can activate your future.

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Nano Futures and Electronic Structure TM

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DOWNLOAD THE ACS MEETINGS & EVENTS

MOBILE APP

DOWNLOAD THE OFFICIAL MEETING PROGRAM FOR THE 2018 BOSTON NATIONAL MEETING •

Stay organized with up-to-the-minute Technical Session, Exhibitor, and Event information

Receive real-time communications from ACS

Locate exhibitors and sessions

Build a personalized schedule and bookmark exhibitors

Connect with your colleagues

Stay in-the-know and join in on social media

Share your event photos and experiences with the Activity Feed

Find Boston local places

AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!

DOWNLOADING THE APP IS EASY! SCAN I

VISIT I http://app.core-apps.com/acsboston18 SEARCH I Search in Apple or Play stores: ACS Meetings & Events

Welcome to Boston and the 256th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. During the next five days, you will be among thousands of chemical professionals from around the globe who will share ideas and examine emerging scientific and technical knowledge on Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond. The meeting organizers have planned an agenda that includes thought-provoking technical sessions and career advancement workshops complemented by a number of social events and networking opportunities. Your meeting registration gives you entry to a range of programming activities, including: • • • • •

Award Presentations Exposition Hall and Career Fair Invited Symposia Scientific and Poster Sessions Special Lectures, Workshops, and Events

Mobile App The South Boston Waterfront area will be the primary meeting location, with technical sessions taking place in the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center(BCEC) and nearby hotels. A few select events will occur in hotels in the city’s Back Bay neighborhood. Be sure to download the ACS Meetings & Events Mobile App and select the 256th ACS National Meeting & Exposition to have the most up-to-date meeting information. Using the app is the best way to stay informed of last-minute program changes. You can also access up-to-date program information and sync your schedule using the Online Planner. Access and download information is available at www.acs.org/ nationalmeeting.

ACS Operations Offices BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER

Location: Room 151A/B Beverly Johnson-Hampton, 617-954-3950 ALOFT BOSTON SEAPORT

Location: Tactic 3 Paulette Nowden, 857-444-8323 x8323 BOSTON PARK PLAZA

Location: Hanco*ck Starleetah Gaddis-Parker, 617-457-2339 HILTON BACK BAY

Location: Mariner Nikki Fisher, 617-867-6425 RENAISSANCE BOSTON WATERFRONT HOTEL

Location: Aegean Dianne Ruddy, 617-342-5440 SEAPORT BOSTON

Location: Liberty A Brianna Ortiz, 617-385-4059 & 617-385-4060 SEAPORT WORLD TRADE CENTER

Location: South End Starleetah Gaddis-Parker, 617-385-4920 & 617-385-4922 SHERATON BOSTON

Location: Meeting Planner Office 3rd Floor Nikki Fisher, 617-351-6824 WESTIN WATERFRONT

Location: Revere Sydney Vranna, 617-502-2274

13

GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

General Meeting Information

GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

General Meeting Information

ACS Specialty Offices ACS JOURNALS OFFICE

Boston Park Plaza Location: Stuart Suite

MOBILE APP HELP DESK

Location: North Lobby NORTHEASTERN LOCAL SECTION

Location: North Lobby 617-954-3413

GOVERNANCE OFFICE

Sheraton Boston Location: Gardner A/B 617-351-6855

PRESS CENTER

HEROES OF CHEMISTRY

SPEAKER READY ROOM

Westin Copley Plaza Location: Empire Suite SOCIETY PROGRAMS OFFICE

Sheraton Boston Location: Fairfax A/B 617-351-6868

ACS Resource Offices All located in the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center ATTENDEE REGISTRATION

Location: North Lobby 617-954-3956 BUS SHUTTLE DESK

Location: North Lobby TMS, 617-954-3414 CAREER FAIR INFORMATION CENTER

Location: Hall A EXHIBITOR REGISTRATION

Location: North Lobby 617-954-3958 HOUSING HELP DESK

Location: North Lobby ConferenceDirect, 617-954-3413 MEMBER LOUNGE

Location: North Lobby 617-954-3412 14

Location: Room 156A Katie Cottingham, 617-954-3960

Location: Room 158

Attendee Resources CAMP ACS

Camp ACS is available to all meeting attendees free of charge from 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM, Sunday, August 19, through Thursday, August 23. If you wish for your child to participate in Camp ACS and you did not complete the registration in advance, go to the BCEC ACS Operations Office to speak with a staff person. Note: There is no guarantee that space is still available. At Camp ACS, children two (and potty trained) to sixteen years of age will participate in ageappropriate activities, including arts and crafts and active games, while you enjoy the meeting. For safety reasons, the location of Camp ACS is communicated only to attendees with enrolled children. EMERGENCIES

ACS has placed detailed instructions inside each meeting room to be used if an emergency occurs during an ACS meeting event. These instructions revolve around following the established

emergency guidelines of the facility where the emergency occurs. Report all emergencies to the nearest security guard or to any ACS Operations Office during the meeting. If an emergency occurs outside an ACS event, contact the police or emergency assistance by dialing 911 or seeking assistance from the facility where the emergency occurs. Should a catastrophic event occur while the meeting is underway, follow safety and security instructions issued by the facility where you are located at the time of the event. LOST & FOUND

Found items delivered to an ACS Operations Office can be retrieved, with acceptable identification, during office operating hours. Items not retrieved by the close of the meeting will be turned over to the venue’s security office. LUGGAGE & COAT CHECK

The luggage and coat check station is in the ACS Resource Hub located in the BCEC. Hours of Operation Saturday, August 18 3:00 PM–7:00 PM

Sunday, August 19 7:30 AM–8:00 PM

Monday, August 20 7:30 AM–9:00 PM

Tuesday, August 21 7:30 AM–9:00 PM

Wednesday, August 22 7:30 AM–6:00 PM

Thursday, August 23 7:30 AM –6:00 PM

Items left beyond the published hours of operation will be turned over to building security at the end of each day. PARENT/INFANT ROOM

For convenience and privacy, ACS has designated a room for parents in the BCEC for nursing, feeding, and changing infants. Please see the staff at the Information Booth in the North Lobby for further information. SALES TAX IN BOSTON

The sales tax rate in Boston is 6.25%. GENERAL TIPPING GUIDELINES

Airport Porters & Bell Staff: $1/bag Bartenders: 15–20%

to as “the Society”), royalty-free permission, including the exclusive worldwide, irrevocable rights in all languages, to reproduce in all formats, including but not limited to print, microfilm, electronic, and/or CD-ROM, likeness as shown in the photograph(s) or recordings taken by official meeting photographers at the American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition. Attendees waive the right to inspect or approve any copy that is used in connection with the photographs and release and discharge the Society from any and all claims arising out of use by the Society of the photographs for the purposes described above, including any claims for libel and invasion of privacy.

Restaurant Wait Staff: 18–20%

ADA COMPLIANCE

Housekeeping Staff: $1–2/night

ACS is dedicated to ensuring that no individual with a disability is excluded, denied services, segregated, or otherwise treated differently because of the absence of auxiliary aids and services identified in the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you have an emergency or need immediate assistance during the meeting, please contact any ACS Operations Office.

WI-FI SERVICE

Enjoy free Wi-Fi service in the common areas of the BCEC.

Meeting Policies RECORDING & PHOTO RELEASE POLICIES

The use of any device to capture images (e.g., cameras and camera phones) or sound (e.g., tape and digital recorders) or stream, upload or rebroadcast speakers or presentations is strictly prohibited at all official ACS meetings and events without the express written consent from the ACS. By registering for this public event, attendees grant to the American Chemical Society, its affiliates and licensees (collectively referred

The BCECis ADA compliant. It is equipped with service ramps to entrances and elevated areas, an array of passenger elevators, restroom facilities for the disabled, braille instructions/directions at strategic locations throughout the building, and pay phones located at each level of the facility with (TDD) hearing-impaired functions.

ELECTRONIC DEVICES

As a courtesy to other meeting attendees, electronic devices must be operated in silent/vibrate mode within technical or educational sessions. Cell phone conversations are not permitted in meeting rooms. LITERATURE & PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION

Promotions, posters, and literature distribution by attendees, exhibitors, or other groups during the meeting must be done within their own contracted meeting space or exhibit booth and not in public meeting space, with the exception of designated marketing opportunities. Only ACS Operations Office staff is authorized to place any promotional items in public meeting space. Items left in violation of this policy will be removed and discarded. Literature distribution at specific division tables is under the control of that division, and permission must be secured from the division before placing any items on its table. SMOKING

ACS policy prohibits smoking in all official meeting venue rooms during ACS functions. Additionally, as a reminder, the Convention Center and hotels are self-determined smoke-free environments at all times.

15

GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

General Meeting Information

GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

General Meeting Information

Be Mindful & Aware EVERYDAY SAFETY TIPS

• Be aware of your surroundings at all times. • If someone or something looks suspicious, report it and/or avoid it. • Walk in open and well-lit areas at night. • Travel in groups; do not be a loner, particularly in the evening. HOTEL SAFETY & SECURITY

• Use the hotel safe deposit service or the in-room safe for valuables. • If you leave items in your luggage, lock it when you leave the room. • In crowded areas where you can be overheard, do not reveal your room number or discuss plans for leaving the hotel. TO & FROM YOUR ROOM

• If, for any reason, you are uncomfortable going to your room alone, ask a bellman or security officer to escort you and to check the room before you enter. • Do not automatically open your door when someone knocks; use the door peephole to identify visitors before opening the door. • Look into the elevator carefully before you enter. If you are uncertain about an occupant, wait for the next elevator. • Look down the corridor carefully for suspicious activity before leaving the elevator. TO & FROM EVENTS

• Remain alert at all times, and be aware of your surroundings and the people you encounter. • Remove your name badge when you are outside meeting venues.

16

Attendee Registration BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER, NORTH LOBBY

Hours of Operation

Saturday, August 18 3:00 PM–6:00 PM

Sunday, August 19 7:30 AM–8:00 PM

Monday, August 20 7:30 AM–9:00 PM

Tuesday, August 21 7:30 AM–7:00 PM

Wednesday, August 22 7:30 AM–7:00 PM

Thursday, August 23 7:30 AM–1:00 PM SATELLITE REGISTRATION: SHERATON BOSTON, 2ND FLOOR REGISTRATION DESK

Hours of Operation

Saturday, August 18 3:00 PM–6:00 PM

Sunday, August 19 7:30 AM–8:00 PM

Monday, August 20 7:30 AM–9:00 PM

Tuesday, August 21 7:30 AM–7:00 PM WHAT YOU CAN DO AT THE REGISTRATION DESK

Register for the meeting Register on site or pick up your badge and registration credentials — all who registered after July 9 and all international attendees. Get a replacement badge Make changes to your registration. Bring your badge and/or registration credentials with you for faster processing.

Pick up your advance purchased Program Book. A limited quantity are available for purchase on site, only in the BCEC. Request a scooter Purchase special & social event tickets All attendees, including speakers and poster presenters, MUST register for the meeting to attend or present in technical sessions. BADGE & BADGE REPLACEMENT

Remember to wear your badge at all times for admission to all official ACS events in meeting properties. Meeting badge holders are recyclable and biodegradable. Please discard in the Badge Recycle bins positioned throughout the meeting venues. If you misplace your badge and need a replacement, please go to Attendee Registration at BCEC. The badge replacement fees are: • 1st replacement: free • 2nd: $25 (cash/credit card) • 3rd: $50 (cash/credit card) • 4th & beyond: $100 each occurrence (cash/credit card) CANCELLATION/REFUND

Cancellation/refund requests received by July 30, 2018, will receive a refund, minus a $50 administrative fee. Requests received after July 30, 2018, are not eligible for a refund. Please direct questions regarding refunds to CDS at 508-743-0192 or 800251-8629. Abstract USB drives and Program Books do not qualify for a refund.

®

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY Volunteer/National Meeting Attendee Conduct Policy

One of the key strengths of the ACS has been the enduring and varied contributions made by its thousands of dedicated volunteers. Another unassailable strength of the ACS is its outstanding national meetings program. ACS national meetings are among the most respected scientific meetings in the world. ACS national meetings offer scientific professionals a legitimate platform to present, publish, discuss, and exhibit the most exciting research discoveries and technologies in chemistry and its related disciplines. Furthermore, ACS national meetings facilitate networking opportunities, career development and placement, and provide organizations with opportunities to exhibit products and services to targeted audiences. The Society’s Congressional Charter explicitly lists among its objectives “the improvement of the qualifications and usefulness of chemists through high standards of professional ethics, education and attainments....” The ACS expects its volunteers and national meeting attendees to display the highest qualities of personal and professional integrity in all aspects of their ACS- related activities. Indeed, every chemical professional has obligations to the public, to volunteer and staff colleagues, and to science. Accordingly, and to foster a positive environment built upon a foundation of trust, respect, open communications, and ethical behavior, the ACS Board of Directors has issued this Conduct Policy. It applies to ACS Volunteers, i.e., it applies to individuals conducting the business and affairs of the ACS without compensation for that conduct. It also applies to attendees at ACS national meetings. Volunteers and national meeting attendees should at all times abide by this Conduct Policy. Specifically: 1. Volunteers should understand and support ACS’s vision and mission. 2. Volunteers and national meeting attendees should contribute to a collegial, inclusive, positive, and respectful environment for their fellow volunteers and attendees, as well as for other stakeholders, including national meeting vendors and ACS staff. 3. Volunteers and national meeting attendees must avoid taking any inappropriate actions based on race, gender, age, religion, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation, gender expression, gender identity, marital status, political affiliation, presence of disabilities, or educational background. They should show consistent respect to colleagues, regardless of the level of their formal education and whether they are from industry,

government, academia, or other scientific and engineering disciplines. 4. Volunteers and national meeting attendees should interact with others in a cooperative and respectful manner. Volunteers and national meeting attendees should refrain from using insulting, harassing, or otherwise offensive language in their ACS interactions. Disruptive, harassing, or inappropriate behavior toward other volunteers, stakeholders, or staff is unacceptable. Personal boundaries set by others must be observed. Harassment of any kind, including but not limited to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment will not be tolerated. 5. Volunteers must obey all applicable laws and regulations of the relevant government authorities while acting on behalf of the ACS. Likewise, national meeting attendees must obey all applicable laws and regulations of the relevant government authorities while attending ACS national meetings. Volunteers and national meeting attendees alike should also ensure that they comply with all applicable safety guidelines relating to public chemistry demonstrations. 6. Volunteers and national meeting attendees should only use ACS’s trademarks, insignia, name, logos, and other intellectual property in compliance with ACS regulations and directives as may be issued from time to time. 7. Violations of this Conduct Policy should be reported promptly to the ACS Secretary and General Counsel or to the Chair of the ACS Board of Directors. In cases of alleged persistent and/or serious violations of this Conduct Policy, the Board shall review the evidence and shall take such actions as may be appropriate, including but not limited to requiring volunteers to leave their volunteer position(s), precluding volunteers from serving in Society volunteer roles in the future, requiring national meeting attendees to leave the meeting, and precluding meeting attendees from attending future ACS national meetings. ACS, through its Board of Directors, reserves the right to pursue additional measures as it may determine are appropriate. Adopted by the Board of Directors 12/6/13

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GENERAL MEETING INFORMATION

Conduct Policy

ACS RESOURCE HUB NORTH LOBBY, BOSTON CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTER SATURDAY, August 18...........................3:00 PM – 6:00 PM SUNDAY, August 19............................... 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM MONDAY, August 20............................ 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM TUESDAY, August 21............................. 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM WEDNESDAY, August 22.................... 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM THURSDAY, August 23.......................... 8:00 AM – 1:00 PM ACS MEMBER LOUNGE Join, renew, or chat about ACS membership and the great benefits. MOBILE APP HELP DESK Have questions about the ACS Meetings & Events Mobile App? Stop by for all the answers. NORTHEASTERN LOCAL SECTION Learn more about the ACS Local Section host! LOUNGE AREA WITH CHARGING SPOTS Meet up with colleagues and recharge your devices. HOUSING HELP DESK Have a question about hotel reservations? ConferenceDirect is here to help.

Accommodations For attendees in need of housing, some official National Meeting hotels may still have rooms available. Visit www.acs.org/ nationalmeeting for the list of official hotels. ConferenceDirect is the official housing bureau for the National Meeting, and ACS does not endorse booking hotel reservations through any other source. All attendees who make reservations through ConferenceDirect will receive complimentary internet access in their rooms. ConferenceDirect will be located in the ACS Resource Hub in the BCEC North Lobby throughout the National Meeting to assist you with last-minute housing changes or needs.

Traveling to Meeting Venues ACS SHUTTLE BUS

Many of the official hotels are in walking distance to the BCEC. ACS will provide complimentary shuttle bus service between the BCEC and official hotels that are not in walking distance. For more information, refer to the Shuttle Map located on Page 20.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Boston’s public transportation system, the MBTA, connects all of Boston and its suburbs by subway, rail, bus, and even boat. Visit www. mbta.com for more information. TAXI SERVICE

The city of Boston has an extensive taxi service. Your hotel concierge can assist you with arranging taxi service. RIDESHARE SERVICES

DAILY PARKING AT THE BCEC

Valet Parking: Valet parking ($30) is available during most events. Cash and all major credit cards are accepted. BCEC South Parking Lot: Space is limited and is available on a first come, first served basis. Rates are $18 for regular-sized vehicles and $36 for oversized vehicles. Alternate Parking: Additional parking may be available at the Boston Marine Industrial Park (BMIP) Garage, which is within walking distance of the BCEC. Space is available on a first come, first served basis.

Lyft and Uber operate in Boston. Download the respective apps in your mobile app store for pricing and availability.

JOIN

ACS Before August 23 and

SAVE! Get a refund for up to $400 on registration fees by becoming an ACS Member. Visit the Member Lounge in the BCEC North Lobby to join!

19

ACCOMMODATIONS & TRAVEL

Accommodations & Travel Accommodations/TavelAP

2018

ACCOMMODATIONS & TRAVEL

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY National Meeting & Exposition

Aug. 19–23

Boston I MA

SHUTTLE HOURS OF OPERATION Sunday, August 19, 2018 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM. . . . every 15 minutes 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. . every 30 minutes* 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM. . . . . every 15 minutes 7:00 PM – 11:00 PM. . . every 30 minutes* Monday, August 20, 2018 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM. . . . every 15 minutes 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. . every 30 minutes* 4:00 PM – 11:00 PM. . . . . every 15 minutes

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 7:00 AM – 10:00 AM. . . . every 15 minutes 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. . every 30 minutes* 4:00 PM – 11:00 PM. . . . . every 15 minutes Wednesday, August 22, 2018 7:00 AM – 11:00 PM. . . every 30 minutes* Thursday, August 23, 2018 7:00 AM – 6:00 PM. . . . every 60 minutes

*Departs BCEC on the hour and half hour. Please note: Shuttle interval times can be affected by weather and traffic conditions. Map Number

1 2 3

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Aloft Boston Seaport BMGT, CARB, CELL, PROF, SCHB

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For all shuttle inquiries and wheelchair assistance, please call TMS: 1.866.439.8564

ACCOMMODATIONS & TRAVEL

D S13 t

CAMPUS MAP

K S treet

EXHIBITOR WORKSHOPS Exhibiting companies will host FREE educational sessions for attendees that will introduce new products and services, highlight innovative applications for existing instrumentation, and build skills with specific tools and techniques. Sessions will take place Sunday–Tuesday on the Expo Floor and Room 155 at the BCEC.

INNOVATION FAIR Visit the Innovation Fair exhibitors to see the most cutting-edge products and services provided by brandnew companies just starting out in the chemical industry! Located on the Expo Floor, booths #2608–2713

STUDENT & EDUCATOR ACTIVITIES

Student & Educator Activities

HONORING OUR VOLUNTEERS

Tuesday, August 21, 2018 Boston Park Plaza 8PM Poster Session & Reception Statler Room

9PM Ceremony Grand Ballroom A/B

10PM After Party Grand Ballroom A/B

www.acs.org/chemluminary

Undergraduate students, graduate students, high school teachers, and chemical professionals will have the opportunity to participate in a number of education-focused programs and specialty activities developed specifically for each group. Explore these opportunities in depth at www.acs.org/nationalmeeting.

Undergraduate Program Program Chair: Amy Keirstead, University of New England, [emailprotected] The Society Committee on Education’s Undergraduate Programs Advisory Board has planned a vibrant program designed especially for undergraduate students. The technical symposia and workshops will focus on essential skills for employment in chemistry and success in graduate school.

23

2018

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY National Meeting & Exposition

Boston I MA

Aug. 19–23

CORE STUDENT PROGRAM SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 2018 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM

ACS Kids Zone I Boston Children’s Museum Sponsored by the ACS Committee on Community Activities

SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2018 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Student Hospitality Center • Seaport World Trade Center, Cityview Ballroom 1

8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Undergraduate Research Papers (Oral) • Seaport World Trade Center, Cambridge 1/2

9:00 – 10:00 AM

The Road Not Taken • Seaport World Trade Center, Cityview Ballroom 2

10:00 – 11:15 AM

Graduate School: The Ins and Outs of Getting In • Seaport Boston Hotel,

11:15 AM – 12:30 PM

The Graduate School Experience: What to Expect • Seaport Boston Hotel, Plaza Ballroom C

12:30 – 2:00 PM 2:00 – 5:00 PM 5:00 – 7:00 PM

Plaza Ballroom A/B

Networking 101 • Seaport Boston Hotel, Plaza Ballroom A/B Sponsored by the ACS Younger Chemists Committee

Graduate School Fair • Seaport World Trade Center, HarborView Science Communication: Speaking to the Public • Harpoon Brewery and Beer Hall, 306 Northern Ave Cosponsored by the ACS on Campus

MONDAY, AUGUST 20, 2018 8:30 – 10:30 AM 9:00 – 10:30 AM 10:30 – 11:55 AM

Student Hospitality Center • Seaport World Trade Center, Cityview Ballroom 1 It is Easy Being Green! • Seaport World Trade Center, Waterfront Ballroom 2 Cosponsored by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute

The Boston Tea Party • Seaport World Trade Center, Cityview Ballroom 2 Eminent Scientist Lecture and Luncheon • Seaport World Trade Center, Cityview Ballroom 1/2

12:00 – 1:30 PM

The Road Less Traveled: Exploring Career Possibilities in Chemistry JoAnne Stubbe, Novartis Professor Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cosponsored by the ACS Division on Professional Relations

Undergraduate Research Poster Session • Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall B2/C 2:00 – 4:00 PM

Cosponsored by the ACS Divisions of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, Analytical, Biological, Environmental, Inorganic, Medicinal, Physical, Polymer Chemistry, and Geochemistry, and the Society Committee on Education

5:15 – 6:30 PM

The Fred Kavli Foundation Innovation in Chemistry Lecture •

8:00 – 10:00 PM

Sci-Mix/Successful Student Chapters Poster Session • Boston Convention & Exhibition

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Ballroom West

Center, Exhibit Hall B2/C

All events are sponsored or cosponsored by the Society Committee on Education Undergraduate Programming Advisory Board. Undergraduate Programming Advisory Board Chair: Michael R. Adams I Xavier University of Louisiana Program Chair: Amy Keirstead I University of New England (ME)

acs.org/studentmeetinginfo

ACS CAREER NAVIGATOR

ACS Career Navigator is your home for career services, leadership development, and professional education resources. We offer comprehensive and easily identified tools to help you achieve your career goals by landing a new job, finding a new career path, comparing your salary, and viewing current trends in the chemistry enterprise to make more informed decisions. Opportunities for career development abound at the ACS National Meeting in Boston. Take advantage of the resources and tools the ACS Career Navigator offers to help you succeed in the global scientific enterprise. Are you ready to get started? Refresh your skills and branch into new areas of emerging science and advanced applications with an ACS Professional Education Short Course. Take an ACS Leadership Development System® course to gain skills that are immediately applied on the job or in school. Register for an ACS Career Pathways™ workshop to help you find a career pathway and a job in the chemical sciences that’s right for you. While you’re in the expo hall, make sure to head to the ACS Career Fair to network with recruiters. Learn more on page 27. Whatever your career goals, the ACS Career Navigator is here to help you achieve and exceed them.

ACS CAREER PATHWAYS™ WORKSHOPS

Our career-related workshops on varying topics will help you with everything from improving your résumé to optimizing job performance to acing an interview. Workshop times are subject to change. Please check the Online Planner or Mobile App for upto-date schedule and location information. ACS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SHORT COURSES

Our training courses are specifically designed to improve the skills and marketability of chemical scientists and technicians and are offered in conjunction with the National Meeting. ACS Member, early registration, and group discount rates are available. If you did not register for a course when you registered for the meeting, you can do so, depending on space availability, in the Attendee Registration Office, in BCEC Hall A. Visit the meeting website, www.acs.org/nationalmeeting for more information on these courses.

2018 ACS LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM COURSE OFFERINGS

Whether you are a manager, experienced professional, or new member of the workforce, we invite you to attend an ACS Leadership Development System® course held at the ACS National Meeting. Each of the four-hour facilitated courses require a deposit of $50 that will be refunded after attendance for ACS Members and a $300 fee each for nonmembers. If you did not register for a course when you registered for the meeting, you can do so, depending on space availability, at Attendee Registration, BCEC Hall A. Visit the meeting website, www.acs. org/nationalmeeting for more information on these courses.

For more information on ACS Short Courses, visit www.proed.acs.org/boston. If you have questions, call 202-872-4508, fax 202-872-6336, or email [emailprotected].

25

CAREER NAVIGATOR

Career Navigator

NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY & BEYOND KAVLI LECTURE SERIES MODERATED BY DR. PETER K. DORHOUT, ACS PRESIDENT Sponsored by The Kavli Foundation

KAVLI ad

KAVLI EMERGING LEADER IN CHEMISTRY LECTURE Jill Millstone — University of Pittsburgh Metal-Ligand Chemistry in Nanoparticle Synthesis and Performance Monday, August 20 I 4:00 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center — Ballroom West KAVLI INNOVATIONS IN CHEMISTRY LECTURE Harry Atwater — California Institute of Technology Light as Fuel Monday, August 20 I 5:15 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center — Ballroom West

BRAIN INITIATIVE SYMPOSIA NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY IN NEUROSCIENCE & THE BRAIN INITIATIVE Tuesday, August 21 I 9:00 AM Organizer & Presider: Anne Andrews THE ROLE OF THE CHEMICAL SCIENCES IN BRAIN RESEARCH & THE BRAIN INITIATIVE Tuesday, August 21 I 1:30 PM Organizer: Jonathan Sweedler

The Kavli Foundation Lecture Series promotes groundbreaking discovery and public understanding of the world’s mounting challenges and how chemistry can provide solutions. The American Chemical Society gratefully acknowledges The Kavli Foundation’s generous support for The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture and The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture.

Exposition Meet, network, learn, and conduct business with over 250 companies and organizations showcasing the most state-of-the-art chemical product and services. Exposition admission is complimentary for all National Meeting registrants. You are required to wear your badge. Individuals who want to visit the exhibits without registering for the technical component of the National Meeting can obtain an expo-only badge for $10. Purchase your ticket at Attendee Registration, BCEC North Lobby. Registration can be handled online, by mail, or in person.

ACS Career Fair Visit the ACS Career Fair, where you can network with recruiters from top employers. As an ACS Member, you can create an online profile and upload your resumes to our database, so recruiters can schedule in-person interviews with you. You can also take advantage of ACS Career Consultants for personalized career advice, including resume and LinkedIn reviews, mock interviews, and consultations with immigration attorneys. You can even get your professional headshot taken.

Exhibitor Workshops Learn from industry experts about emerging trends, state of the industry issues, and approaches to solve your most pressing challenges. Workshops will be conducted in two expo theaters during posted times. Check the Mobile App for the most up-to-date schedule.

Recharge & Social Media Lounge NEW! Relax, recharge, and get social in our new lounge. While you’re there, give your devices a boost too by taking advantage of one of the many charging amenities. Take selfies and watch the meeting happenings scroll by on social media on our monitors.

Special Events in the Expo Hall Welcome Reception Sunday, August 19, 5:30 PM–7:30 PM, Hall A, BCEC Visit with exhibitors and meet new friends at the kick-off event of the Meeting!

Featured Areas ACS BOOTH #1418

Visit the ACS booth, where various staff units will present the plethora of benefits, services, products, and merchandise offered by ACS. INNOVATION FAIR, BOOTHS #2608–2713

Visit the most innovative startup companies in the chemical industry! Be the first to meet the industry stars of tomorrow. SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS ROW, BOOTHS #632–2432

Check out what these small but mighty companies are featuring and how they can be an invaluable resource to you.

Poster Sessions Engage in illuminating conversation with poster presenters at the following divisional poster sessions: Small Chemical Business and COLL Sunday, August 19, 5:30 PM–7:30 PM ENFL Monday, August 20, 3:00 PM–5:00 PM Caffeinate & Communicate Mingle with fellow attendees and exhibitors while grabbing a cup o’ joe or cold beverage during these afternoon breaks. • Monday, August 20, 1:00 PM–3:00 PM • Tuesday, August 21, 3:00 PM–5:00 PM Meet the ACS President-Elect Candidates Monday, 1:00 PM–4:00 PM 27

EXPO & CAREER FAIR HIGHLIGHTS

Expo & Career Fair Highlights

JOIN THE

ACS BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGULAR SESSION Sunday, August 19, 2018

Noon - 1:00 p.m.

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom West (Ballroom Level 3) Doors open at 11:45 a.m. Sandwiches and soft drinks available while supplies last FEATURING GUEST SPEAKER:

SIR FRASER STODDART, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

JIM PRISCHING PHOTOGRAPHY

“Transformative Research: Doing Your Own Thing” Nobel Laureate Sir Fraser Stoddart, D.Sc. is a Board of Trustees Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Center for the Chemistry of Integrated Systems at Northwestern University. Before moving to Northwestern in 2008, Professor Stoddart was formerly the Director of the California NanoSystems Institute and the Fred Kavli Chair of NanoSystems Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. Throughout his distinguished career, Professor Stoddart has received numerous prestigious awards and honors for his discoveries and innovations. In 2016, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Ben Feringa (University of Groningen, the Netherlands) and Jean-Pierre Sauvage (University of Strasbourg, France) for the design and synthesis of molecular machines. Professor Stoddart is a pioneer in the fields of supramolecular chemistry and molecular nanotechnology, and his work has helped open up a new field of chemistry. His research interests are in chemistry beyond the molecule, which, combined with his interest in templation, has led to the template-directed synthesis, based on molecular recognition and self-assembly processes, of a wide range of mechanically interlocked molecules, bistable variants of which have found their way in the form of switches into molecular electronic devices and drug delivery systems. The Sunday Times in the U.K. once noted that Stoddart “is to nanotechnology what J.K. Rowling is to children’s literature.” Professor Stoddart is a native of Scotland, and he received his B.Sc., Ph.D., and D.Sc. degrees from Edinburgh University. Nobel Laureate Sir Fraser Stoddart is serving as Champion for the 50 Forward fundraising campaign in celebration of ACS Project SEED’s 50th Anniversary. He is active in reaching out to new scientists as well as others both inside and outside the scientific community via @sirfrasersays on Twitter.

American Chemical Society

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

ACS Board of Directors 2018

2018 ACS Board of Directors

John E. Adams

Christina C. Bodurow

Allison A. Campbell

Bonnie A. Charpentier

Thomas Connelly, Jr.

Peter K. Dorhout

Teri Quinn Gray

Rigoberto Hernandez

Paul W. Jagodzinski

Wayne E. Jones, Jr.

Lee H. Latimer

Ingrid Montes

Laura E. Pence

Dorothy J. Phillips

Barbara A. Sawrey

Kathleen M. Schulz

District V Chair

Executive Director & CEO

District VI

District I

District II

President

Director-At-Large

Director-At-Large

Immediate Past President

District III

Director-At-Large

Director-At-Large

President-Elect

District IV

Director-At-Large

Director-At-Large

1/1/18

29

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

Governance & Business Meetings

Many members participate in meetings concerning the business of the Society, technical divisions, and governance committees in conjunction with the National Meeting. The following pages list the open meetings scheduled for Boston. ACS encourages its members to get active in governance at all levels in order to contribute their vision to the direction of the Society. You can share ideas and insights into the Society and the chemical profession, network with peers, and catch up with friends through these volunteer connections. With nearly 30 national governance committees and leadership opportunities in technical divisions and local sections to choose from, there are many opportunities for members to become actively involved in ACS at the national level. If you are an ACS Member interested in volunteering for a governance committee, contact the Office of the Secretary at [emailprotected] or by telephone at 202-872-4461. Someone will put you in contact with the ACS Committee on Committees to discuss your desire to volunteer for a committee assignment. If you wish to volunteer for a specific technical division or local section, contact the officers listed at www.acs.org to explore your specific interests.

30

Board & Council Meetings ACS Board of Directors The ACS Board of Directors meeting is open to all members who wish to participate. Sunday, August 19, 12:00 PM–1:00 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Ballroom West Guest Speaker: Sir Fraser Stoddart, Board of Trustees Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Stoddart Mechanostereochemistry Group, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University ACS Council Wednesday, August 22 Breakfast: 7:00 AM Meeting: 8:00 AM Hynes Convention Center, Ballroom Councilors should check in beginning at 7:00 AM and proceed to the breakfast area, keeping in mind that the meeting starts promptly at 8:00 AM. Space will be available for ACS Members and nonmembers to observe the council in action. We hope that many will take advantage of this opportunity to learn firsthand about the society’s operation. Alternate councilors and division and local section officers are particularly urged to attend.

Committee Meeting Formats and Structure ACS governance committees generally operate in one of three formats as described below. These formats can change during the course of a meeting as discussions and deliberations change. It is the responsibility of the Committee Chair and the Staff Liaison to ensure that only the appropriate people are present during a meeting. Open: May be attended by any ACS Member. At these meetings, members are encouraged to voice concerns, issue compliments, offer suggestions, express interest in, or raise questions about matters over which the committee has purview. The assumption is that participation is welcomed and will be orderly and courteous. Only committee members may vote. Closed: The Committee Chair must declare any Executive meeting Closed when confidential or sensitive personnel, financial, or legal matters of the Society are discussed. At that point, only officially appointed/elected Committee Members, Associates, Consultants, Staff Liaisons, and the appointed ConC liaison shall remain in the meeting. Others may stay in the meeting at the discretion of the Chair. Once these discussions are completed, the committee should return to the Executive mode. Executive: Attendance and participation is limited to officially appointed/elected Committee Members, Associates, Advisors, Consultants, Staff Liaisons, and the appointed ConC liaison. Liaisons from other groups and both ex officio and elected Councilors may attend; active participation by these groups is at the invitation of the Chair. Only committee members may vote.

If you cannot attend the particular committee meeting of interest or for further information, contact the officers listed. Budget & Finance Joseph A. Heppert, Chair [emailprotected] Open Meeting:

Community Activities Michael B. McGinnis, Chair [emailprotected] Closed Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 7:00 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Republic B CCA/LSAC Joint Open Meeting:

Tuesday, August 21, 2:00 PM–3:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Commonwealth

Saturday, August 18, 8:00 AM–10:30 AM Sheraton Boston I Constitution A

Constitution & Bylaws V. Dean Adams, Chair [emailprotected]

Chemical Safety Ralph Stuart, Chair [emailprotected]

Open Meeting:

Open Executive Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 8:15 AM–9:45 AM Sheraton Boston Monday, August 20, 7:00 AM–8:30 AM Sheraton Boston Chemistry & Public Affairs Raymond E. Forslund, Chair [emailprotected] Open Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 3:00 PM–4:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Constitution B Chemists with Disabilities James Schiller, Chair [emailprotected] Combined Open and Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:30 AM–4:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Commonwealth Committees Carolyn Ribes, Chair [emailprotected] Open Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 1:30 PM–2:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Constitution A

Sunday, August 19, 1:30 PM–1:45 PM Sheraton Boston I Republic A Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 10:00–11:30 AM & 1:45 PM–4:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Republic A Corporation Associates Diane Grob Schmidt, Chair [emailprotected] Open Meeting:

Economic & Professional Affairs Tiffany ho*rter, Chair [emailprotected] Executive Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 8:00 AM–5:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Independence West Education Jennifer Nielson, Chair [emailprotected] Executive Meeting:

Friday, August 17, 1:00 PM–5:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Republic B Open Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 3:00 PM–4:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Berkeley A/B Environmental Improvement Anthony (Tony) Noce, Chair [emailprotected] Breakfast/Open Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 7:45 AM–9:00 AM Aloft Boston Seaport I Smoot

Monday, August 20, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay C

Ethics Judith Currano, Chair [emailprotected]

Council Policy Mary K. Carroll, Vice Chair [emailprotected]

Open Executive Meeting:

Open Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 9:00 AM–4:30 PM Sheraton Boston I The Fens

Tuesday, August 21, 9:30 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Constitution B

International Activities Jens Breffke, Chair [emailprotected]

Divisional Activities Rodney M. Bennett, Chair [emailprotected]

Open Meeting:

Open Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Hilton Back Bay I Maverick A/B

Saturday, August 18, 1:00 PM–3:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Republic B Local Section Activities Jason Ritchie, Chair [emailprotected] Open Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay B LSAC/CCA Joint Open Meeting:

Tuesday, August 21, 2:00 PM–3:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Commonwealth 31

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

Governance & Business Meetings

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

Governance & Business Meetings

Meetings & Expositions Kevin J. Edgar, Chair [emailprotected]

Patents & Related Matters Kirby Drake, Chair [emailprotected]

Senior Chemists Thomas R. Beattie, Chair; [emailprotected]

Open Meeting:

Open Meeting:

Open Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 7:30 AM–10:00 AM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 258A

Saturday, August 18, 9:00 AM–4:00 PM Sheraton Boston

Monday, August 20, 8:00 AM–1:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Riverway

Closed Executive Meeting:

Professional Training Edgar Arriaga, Chair [emailprotected]

Technician Affairs Aime’e Tomlinson, Chair [emailprotected]

Open Meeting:

Closed Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 4:00 PM–6:00 PM Hilton Back Bay I Maverick B

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–2:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Constitution B

Project SEED Don Warner, Chair [emailprotected]

Sunday, August 19, 2:00 PM–2:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Constitution B

Sunday, August 19, 10:00 AM–12:00 PM Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 258A Membership Affairs Margaret J. Schooler, Chair Closed Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–3:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay A Open Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 3:00 PM–4:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay A Minority Affairs Ann Kimble-Hill, Chair [emailprotected] Closed Executive Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–12:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay C Open Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 12:30 PM–2:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay C Nomenclature, Terminology & Symbols Michael D. Mosher, Chair [emailprotected] Open Executive Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 10:00 AM–12:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Hampton A/B Open Meeting:

Open Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 9:30 AM–10:30 AM Sheraton Boston I Public Garden

Closed Executive Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 10:30 AM–5:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Public Garden

Saturday, August 18, 8:00 AM–5:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay C

Public Relations & Communications Jennifer Maclachlan, Chair [emailprotected]

Younger Chemists Natalie A. LaFranzo, Chair [emailprotected]

Open Executive Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 8:00 AM–1:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay A Publications Nicole S. Sampson, Chair Open Meeting:

Friday, August 17, 4:30 PM–5:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Hampton A/B Executive Meeting:

Friday, August 17, 12:00 PM–5:00 PM (Closed until 4:30 PM) Sheraton Boston I Hampton A/B

Nominations & Elections Les W. McQuire, Chair [emailprotected]

Science Mark C. Cesa, Chair [emailprotected]

Monday, August 20, 11:30 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Independence West 32

Women Chemists Kimberly A. Woznack, Chair [emailprotected]

Closed Executive Meeting:

Monday, August 20, 1:30 PM–5:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Hampton A/B

Open Executive Meeting:

Open Executive Meeting:

Open Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 8:30 AM–4:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay A

Closed Meeting:

Saturday, August 18, 8:00 AM–3:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay D Open Meeting:

Sunday, August 19, 8:00 AM–12:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Back Bay D Council Policy Committee The Council Policy Committee will open the floor during its meeting at 11:30 AM on Tuesday, August 21, to councilors who would like to raise issues of concern that affect them and/or their local sections or divisions. For further information, contact the committee Vice Chair, Mary Carroll, at [emailprotected].

Councilor Caucus Meetings District I Councilor Caucus

District V Councilor Caucus

Tuesday, August 21, 5:30 PM–6:30 PM Sheraton Boston I Commonwealth

Sunday, August 19, 6:00 PM–7:00 PM Sheraton Boston I The Fens

Sunday, August 19, 6:00 PM–7:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Hampton A/B

Sunday, August 19, 6:00 PM–7:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Public Garden

District II Councilor Caucus

District III Councilor Caucus

Sunday, August 19, 6:00 PM–7:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Berkeley A/B District IV Councilor Caucus

Sunday, August 19, 6:00 PM–7:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Riverway

GOVERNANCE & BUSINESS MEETINGS

Governance & Business Meetings

District VI Councilor Caucus

Division Officers/Councilors Caucus

Tuesday, August 21, 4:00 PM–6:00 PM Sheraton Boston I Riverway

Renew and Save ACS is offering an exclusive discount to current members who renew their membership during the ACS National Meeting in Boston. Visit the Member Lounge (North Lobby of the BCEC) Saturday, August 18-Thursday, August 23 during Registration Hours and receive 20% OFF* your membership renewal. Upgrade to a multi-year membership and take advantage of even greater savings. *Offer valid On-Site at the National Meeting only

33

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events Division of Agriculture & Food (AGFD) AGFD Special Topics

Sunday, August 19

12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109A

Reception at AGFD Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

5:00 PM–7:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Exhibit Hall B2/C

AGFD Future Programs

Monday, August 20

12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 107B

AGFD Executive Committee Meeting

Monday, August 20

5:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 107C

AGFD Business Meeting

Tuesday, August 21

12:15 PM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

Division of Agrochemicals (AGRO) AGRO Morning Coffee Break 1

Sunday, August 19

10:00 AM–10:30 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Afternoon Coffee Break 1

Sunday, August 19

2:45 PM–3:15 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

5:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 207

AGRO Morning Coffee Break 2

Monday, August 20

9:45 AM–10:15 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Graduate Student Lunch

Monday, August 20

11:45 AM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

AGRO Afternoon Coffee Break 2

Monday, August 20

2:45 PM–3:15 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Morning Coffee Break 3

Tuesday, August 21

9:45 AM–10:15 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Afternoon Coffee Break 3

Tuesday, August 21

3:00 PM–3:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO VIP (Vendor Interfaces Program) Vendor Face-to-Face Meet & Greet

Tuesday, August 21

5:00 PM–6:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

AGRO Blues-N-Brews

Tuesday, August 21

6:00 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

AGRO Morning Coffee Break 4

Wednesday, August 22

9:45 AM–10:15 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Poster Session

Wednesday, August 22

11:30 AM–2:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom Pre-Function

AGRO Afternoon Coffee Break 4

Wednesday, August 22

3:45 PM–4:15 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

AGRO Award Social

Wednesday, August 22

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

AGRO Morning Coffee Break 5

Thursday, August 23

10:00 AM–10:30 AM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

Your AGRO Mixer

Thursday, August 23

12:15 PM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Ballroom East

34

Division of Analytical Chemistry (ANYL) ANYL Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 103

ANYL Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

Reception for Sterling Hendricks Award Symposium

Tuesday, August 21

12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 107B

Chemical Forensics Workshop A

Tuesday, August 21

1:00 PM–6:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 210A

Chemical Forensics Workshop B

Tuesday, August 21

1:00 PM–6:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 210A

Analytical Division Reception

Tuesday, August 21

5:00 PM–7:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

Chemical Forensics Workshop

Wednesday, August 22

8:00 AM–6:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 210A

Division of Biological Chemistry (BIOL) Hammes Award Reception

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–6:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 153B

BIOL Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

6:30 PM–8:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

BIOL Poster Session

Tuesday, August 21

6:30 PM–8:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

Aloft Boston Seaport

Summer 1

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry (CARB) CARB Centennial Planning Meeting

Monday, August 20

7:00 PM–11:00 PM

Division of of Chemical Education (CHED) CHED Program Committee Meeting

Saturday, August 18

10:30 AM–12:00 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Cambridge 2

CHED Executive Committee Meeting

Saturday, August 18

1:00 PM–5:30 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Waterfront Ballroom 3

CHED/SOCED Task Force on Chemistry Teacher Programming

Saturday, August 18

3:30 PM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 104C

CHED Luncheon

Sunday, August 19

12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Waterfront Ballroom 1/2

CHED Long Range Planning Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

2:30 PM–4:30PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Dartmouth

CHED Safety Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

4:00 PM–5:30 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Beacon Hill 2

CHED Social Reception

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–7:00 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Cityview Ballroom 2

CHED Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

35

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events Division of Chemical Health & Safety (CHAS) Laboratory Safety – Beyond the Fundamentals

Friday, August 17

8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 204A

Laboratory Waste Management

Friday, August 17

8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 203

Health & Safety Training for Cannabis Businesses

Saturday, August 18

8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 204B

How to Be a More Effective Chemical Hygiene Officer

Saturday, August 18

8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 204A

Reactive Chemical Management for Laboratories and Pilot Plant

Saturday, August 18

8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 203

CHAS Executive Committee Meeting

Monday, August 20

10:00 AM–1:00 PM

Seaport Boston Hotel

Seaport Ballroom B

Division of Chemical Information (CINF) CINF Awards Committee

Saturday, August 18

12:30 PM–2:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Adams

CINF Education Committee

Saturday, August 18

12:30 PM–2:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Alcott

CINF Program & Executive Committees

Saturday, August 18

12:30 PM–6:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Douglass

CINF Welcome Reception & Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

6:30 PM–8:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Galleria

CINF Division Luncheon

Tuesday, August 21

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Grand Ballroom A

Division of Chemistry and the Law (CHAL) CHAL Networking Luncheon

Monday, August 20

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Webster

CHAL Reception

Monday, August 20

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

Division of Chemical Toxicology (TOXI) TOXI Executive Committee Meeting

Saturday, August 18

7:00 PM–10:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Bulfinch

TOXI Posters

Monday, August 20

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Galleria

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258B

Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry (COLL) COLL Program and Executive Committee Meeting

Saturday, August 18

4:00 PM–7:00 PM

COLL Open Meeting

Sunday, August 19,

5:30 PM–6:00 PM

COLL Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

COLL Luncheon

Tuesday, August 21

12:15 PM–1:45 PM

36

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A Room 210C

Division of Computers in Chemistry (COMP) COMP Programming & Executive Committee Meeting

Saturday, August 18

3:00 PM–6:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Faneuil

COMP Poster Session

Tuesday, August 21

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Exhibit Hall B1

Division of Engineering & Fuel (ENFL) ENFL Program Meeting

Sunday, August 19

12:30 PM–4:00 PM

Renaissance Boston Waterfront

Brewster

ENFL Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

4:00 PM–7:30 PM

Renaissance Boston Waterfront

Brewster

ENFL Business Meeting & Social

Monday, August 20

11:30 AM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 052B

ENFL Division Dinner

Tuesday, August 21

6:00 PM–10:00 PM

Off Site

Tuscan Kitchen

Division of Environmental Chemistry(ENVR) ENVR Industry Advisory Board Meeting

Sunday, August 19

1:00 PM–2:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Program Planning Meeting

Sunday, August 19

2:00 PM–3:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Long Range Planning Meeting

Sunday, August 19

3:00 PM–5:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Members Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

7:00 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

7:30 PM–10:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Symposium Organizers' Lunch

Monday, August 20

11:45 AM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 109B

ENVR Division Reception

Tuesday, August 21

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Tico Boston

222 Berkeley Street

Division of Geochemistry (GEOC) GEOC Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 257A

GEOC Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Seaport Boston Hotel

Seaport Ballroom B

Division of History of Chemistry (HIST) HIST Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

37

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events Division of Inorganic Chemistry (INOR) INOR Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

INOR Poster Session

Tuesday, August 21

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

INOR Poster Session

Wednesday, August 22

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

Division of Medicinal Chemistry (MEDI) MEDI Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

8:30 AM–1:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 257B

MEDI Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–6:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 257B

MEDI General Posters

Sunday, August 19

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Exhibit Hall B1

MEDI Long Range Planning Committee Meeting

Monday, August 20

5:30 PM–10:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258A

Wednesday, August 22

7:00 PM–11:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Galleria

MEDI and ORGN General Posters Social

Division of Nuclear Chemistry Technology (NUCL) NUCL Executive Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–6:30 PM

Seaport World Trade Center

Dartmouth

NUCL Business Meeting

Tuesday, August 21

5:30 PM–6:30 PM

Seaport Boston Hotel

Flagship A

Division of Organic Chemistry (ORGN) ORGN Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

1:00 PM–6:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258C

ORGN Poster Session

Sunday, August 19

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

ORGN Poster Session

Tuesday, August 21

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

Wednesday, August 22

7:00 PM–11:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Galleria

Sunday, August 19

4:30 PM–7:15 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 258A

Wednesday, August 22

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

ORGN/MEDI Poster Session

Division of Physical Chemistry (PHYS) PHYS Executive Committee Meeting PHYS Poster Session

38

Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) PMSE Officers Meeting

Sunday, August 19

3:00 PM–4:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Harbor Ballroom I

PMSE Executive Committee Meeting

Sunday, August 19

4:30 PM–7:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Harbor Ballroom I

PMSE Business Meeting & PMSE/ POLY Coordination Meeting

Monday, August 20

4:00 PM–5:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Commonwealth A

Joint PMSE/POLY Poster Session

Tuesday, August 21

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Halls B2/C

Division of Polymer Chemistry (POLY) POLY Annual Business Meeting

Sunday, August 19

12:00 PM–2:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Harbor Ballroom I

POLY International Committee

Sunday, August 19

2:00 PM–3:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

POLY Workshop Committee

Sunday, August 19

3:00 PM–4:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

Strategic and Long Range Planning (POLY ExCom)

Sunday, August 19

4:00 PM–5:30 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

Executive and Financial Planning (POLY ExCom)

Monday, August 20

12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

POLY Industrial Advisory Board

Tuesday, August 21

8:00 AM–10:00 AM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

POLYEd & IPEC Meeting

Tuesday, August 21

9:00 AM–12:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom III

POLY Programming Meeting & Social

Tuesday, August 21

12:00 PM–2:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Harbor Ballroom I

POLY Membership Committee

Tuesday, August 21

2:00 PM–3:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

Wednesday, August 22

5:30 PM–8:00 PM

Westin Boston Waterfront

Grand Ballroom A

3:00 PM–5:00 PM

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Back Bay C

POLY/PMSE Plenary Symposium & Awards Reception

Division of Professional Relations (PROF) PROF Executive Committee and Open Meeting

Tuesday, August 21

Division of Small Chemical Businesses (SCHB) SCHB Executive Committee Meeting SCHB Coffee & Continental Breakfast

Saturday, August 18

5:00 PM–9:00 PM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 104A

Sunday, August 19

8:00 AM–11:00 AM

Aloft Boston Seaport

Mann 3

SCHB Afternoon Break

Sunday, August 19

1:00 PM–3:30 PM

Aloft Boston Seaport

Mann 3

SCHB Coffee Break

Monday, August 20

8:00 AM–10:30 AM

Aloft Boston Seaport

Mann 3

SCHB Coffee Break

Tuesday, August 21

8:00 AM–11:00 AM

Aloft Boston Seaport

Mann 3

39

DIVISION MEETINGS & SOCIAL EVENTS

Division Meetings & Social Events

Congratulations to the

2018 Heroes of Chemistry Award Recipients AstraZeneca for TAGRISSOTM (osimertinib), a novel, targeted treatment for patients with EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer. Osimertinib is approved in more than 75 countries. DuPont for Solamet® PV17x, a metallization paste that pioneered the use of lead tellurite chemistry, a game changer in the solar energy industry. Pfizer for Inlyta® (axitinib), a standard of care for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma after failure of one prior systemic therapy. Seattle Genetics for ADCETRIS® (brentuximab vedotin), which uses the company’s industry-leading antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) technology and is currently approved for the treatment of multiple CD30-expressing lymphomas. We invite you to apply for the 2019 Heroes of Chemistry Awards. Nominations are open from December 2018 through March 1, 2019. Visit www.acs.org/heroes or email [emailprotected] for more information. The Heroes of Chemistry is an annual award program sponsored by ACS recognizing scientists whose innovative work in chemistry and chemical engineering led to successful commercial products that benefit the world.

August 19, 2018 12:00 PM–1:00 PM

Chemistry Educators Luncheon

Seaport World Trade Center

Waterfront Ballroom 1/2

4:00 PM–5:30 PM

Networking Globally Reception

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Independence East

5:30 PM–7:30 PM

IAC International Welcome Reception

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Back Bay C/D

6:30 PM–7:30 PM

Heroes of Chemistry Reception

Westin Copley Place, Boston

America Center

7:30 PM–10:00 PM

Heroes of Chemistry Dinner and Ceremony

Westin Copley Place, Boston

America North

August 20, 2018 6:45 AM–9:00 AM

YCC/MIP Guided 5K Run Honoring Christine Lopes

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

North Lobby Entrance

7:30 AM–9:00 AM

Women in the Chemical Enterprise Breakfast

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Constitution A

9:30 AM–11:30 AM

Women Chemists of Color Networking Event

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Commonwealth

11:30 AM–1:30 PM

CMA Luncheon

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Constitution B

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

National Science Foundation’s Conversations & Luncheon

Westin Boston Waterfront

Galleria

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

CHAL Networking Lunch

Westin Boston Waterfront

Webster

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

Eminent Scientist Lecture and Luncheon

Seaport World Trade Center

Cityview Ballroom 1/2

6:30 PM–9:30 PM

Chinese-American Chemical Society Dinner Banquet

Hei La Moon Restaurant

88 Beach Street

August 21, 2018 7:30 AM–9:30 AM

Senior Chemists Breakfast

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Republic A/B

7:30 AM–9:30 AM

University of Minnesota Alumni & Friends Breakfast

Seaport Boston Hotel

Lighthouse II

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

CINF Division Luncheon

Westin Boston Waterfront

Grand Ballroom A

12:00 PM–1:30 PM

WCC Luncheon

Sheraton Boston Hotel

Republic A/B

12:15 PM–1:45 PM

COLL Luncheon

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Room 210C

5:00 PM–7:00 PM

Analytical Division Reception

Westin Boston Waterfront

Marina Ballroom IV

6:00 PM–8:00 PM

ENVR Division Reception

Tico Boston

202 Berkeley Street

6:00 PM–10:00 PM

ENFL Division Dinner

Tuscan Kitchen

64 Seaport Boulevard

7:00 PM–9:00 PM

ACS NASA Space Symposium Reception

Westin Boston Waterfront

Harbor Ballroom I

41

TICKETED SOCIAL & SPECIAL EVENTS

Ticketed Social & Special Events

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & APPRECIATION

Acknowledgements & Appreciation

ACS Divisions and Committees are grateful for the financial donations and other contributions received throughout the year and specifically toward the National Meeting. Our accomplishments are due in large part to this support. All of us at ACS acknowledge our appreciation to the many government agencies, educational institutions, organizations, and companies listed on the next page, as well as the others omitted from this list because of printing deadlines.

We Thank Our Volunteers for Their Dedication and Hard Work

ACS Volunteers contribute thousands of hours of service to create and implement programs that promote our science, benefit our members, and contribute to the development of our communities. Thanks to your contributions, the Society provides its over 150,000 members with: • • • • •

Powerful networks on the local, regional, and national levels Specialized technical information and research Expansive career enhancement materials Award-winning publications Meetings and expositions that set industry standards for excellence.

ACS salutes the outstanding volunteer efforts that have contributed to the success of this year’s national and regional meetings, including division chairs, national meeting program officers, regional meeting organizers and program chairs, symposium organizers, session and award presiders, short course and workshop instructors, career counselors, and all members of the Society’s governance. To get involved, go to www.acs.org.

42

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry Japanese Society for Food Factors Division of Agrochemicals BASF Bayer CropScience Corteva Agriscience CropLife America Golden Pacific Laboratories ISK Biosciences JRFA SETAC North America Stone Environmental, Inc. Syngenta Division of Analytical Chemistry ACS Sensor College of Arts and Sciences, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alabama Genovis Inc. ISS, Inc. Waters Corporation Division of Business Development & Management CIEC SQA (Society of Quality Assurance) Division of Chemical Education ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research ACS Northeastern Local Section GCI German Chemical Society I&EC Green Chemistry IPEC Strem Chemicals, Inc.

Division of Chemical Information Chemical Structure Association Trust IUPAC Committee on Publications and Cheminformatics Data Standards (CPCDS) Division of Computers in Chemistry BIOVIA Division of Environmental Chemistry Royal Society of Chemistry SETAC North America Division of Inorganic Chemistry HORIBA Scientific University of South Carolina NanoCenter Division of Organic Chemistry Elsevier Form-Tech (Montreal, Canada) Division of Polymer Chemistry POLY Industrial Advisory Board

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & APPRECIATION

Supporters

Division of Polymeric Materials Science & Engineering ACS Biomacromolecules ACS Central Science ACS Macro Letters ACS Macromolecules Agilent Technologies Akron Ascent Innovations, LLC Bioconjugate Chemistry (ACS Journal) Chem Chemglass Life Sciences Chemistry of Materials Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) — Polymer Division Eastman Chemical Company ExxonMobil Chemical Co. Formosa Plastics Co., USA Henkel Corporation IBM IKA Works, Inc. JACS Joule (Cell Press) Kaneka Americas Holding, Inc. Kurt J. Lesker Company LC Technology Solutions Macromolecules Micrometrics Instrument Corp. MilliporeSigma Polymer (Elsevier) PPG Industries, Inc. Pure Process Technology Royal Society of Chemistry Solvay Specialty Polymers Southwest Petroleum University Strem Chemicals, Inc. Tosoh Bioscience Wiley Division of Small Chemical Businesses Osha Liang LLP Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr LLP Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation

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Join us at the ACS Booth Theater axial.acs.org/boston-2018

Monday, August 20th 9:00 – 9:30 AM Learn more about one of the newest journals in the ACS Publications family in a discussion with managing editors and video chat with Editor-in-Chief Patrick Sexton

Tuesday, August 21st 12:30 – 1:00 PM Celebrate with editors and authors as we kick off the 140th Anniversary of the Journal of the American Chemical Society

LEARN MORE AT THE ACS PUBLICATIONS BOOTH

Are the wrong tools putting your funding at risk?

Get Funded.

Bring your research team to the ACS booth to learn more.

www.cas.org/GetYourGrant

The Versatile Use of Flow Technology in the Modern Chemistry. ThalesNano Nanotechnology Inc. Booth 1615. Sunday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 155. 2:45 PM to 4:45 PM. An interactive session of presentations and discussions with industry and academic leaders in the field of flow chemistry and its application to pharmaceutical and agro-chemical research and development. Attendees will learn the fundamentals of flow chemistry expressed through presentations on a wide variety of reactions and examples. Good NMR Spectroscopic Practices & NMR Beyond Proton, Carbon and Nitrogen. Bruker BioSpin. Booth 708. Monday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 155. 9:30 AM to 11:45 AM. This will be a two-part workshop. The first part will discuss many procedures that lead to better NMR data; including sample preparation, instrument calibration, and adjustment of acquisition parameters. The second part will discuss how to acquire data from a wide variety of nuclei in the liquid state. Tips on how to prepare the instrument for a never before acquired nucleus will be shown with many examples. For more information and to register: www.bruker.com/events/acs.html. ChemDraw 18 Featuring Reaxys: What’s New? PerkinElmer. Booth 927. Monday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 1. 1:15 PM to 2:15 PM. This workshop will give a sneak peek into the new features coming up in ChemDraw 18, such as the new Elsevier Reaxys integration with ChemDraw and the ChemACX Explorer add-in, as well as the shared libraries of HELM Monomers. We will also highlight the latest additions to ChemDraw, such as facilitated copy/pasting, IUPAC namebased atom numbering, CAS RN to Structure from ChemACX add-in, and, as always, some tips and tricks to get the most out of organic chemists’ favorite software application. Mobile Mass Spectrometry — Taking the Laboratory to the Field. Advion. Booth 1908. Tuesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 1. 9:30 AM to 10:30 AM. When instant mass analysis became paramount to the Sheffield University Plant Production and Protection (P3) team, they took the laboratory directly to the field utilizing the expression Compact Mass Spectrometer from Advion. The system provides direct sample analysis of liquids, solids and powders and provides mass spectral information within seconds. This enabled the Sheffield team to obtain rapid detection of metabolite markers in plant samples within the field environment, rather than waiting days for results from the lab. This workshop features the research led by Professor Mike Burrell and Dr. Heather Walker, highlighting how they turned their SUV into a mobile mass spec unit capable of screening the fields to obtain rapid metabolite analysis of several different varieties of wheat. “The utilization of this equipment is of huge benefit as it allows the knowledge that we have gained in the laboratory to be transferred and monitored quickly and easily in the field,” said Dr. Walker. “Using this technology can provide higher detail data on crops in the field than previously possible.”

Discussion Panel: Data Needles in the Content Haystack. SpringNature. Booth 615. Tuesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 2. 10:45 AM to 11:45 AM. Modern scientific research now gives us more data than ever, but sorting through the information flood also brings unique challenges. Powerful tools optimized for specific subjects can help quickly and easily find data on-demand. This panel explores some new, sophisticated searching tools in nanoscience, material science, and biotechnology. Near Infrared to THz Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis. Bruker Optics. Booth 708. Tuesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 1. 12:00 PM to 2:15 PM. Identification of unknown chemicals is in high demand in both research and industrial communities. Organic materials exhibit absorption bands in MIR spectral range: 4000-400 cm-1, while inorganic compounds absorb in the FIR: 400-50 cm-1. Novel optical components have been designed and optimized to record spectra from 6500 cm-1 down to 50 cm-1 without needing to change any optical components. This saves an enormous amount of time in acquiring the complete molecular spectral information and eliminates the risk of breaking expensive optics during the exchange. In many cases, the need for conducting Raman analysis can be obviated. The following applications topics will be discussed in detail: Fast identification of organic and inorganic materials, geological samples and minerals, paint identification for forensics and art conservation, additives in polymers, crystallinity and polymorphism and combined MIR-FIR/THz spectral library.

Research in Germany Science Café. Research In Germany. Booth 2025. Tuesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 1. 3:45 PM to 4:45 PM. The Research in Germany Science Café will feature highlights of basic chemical research at German universities and non-university research institutes such as Max Planck. You will hear testimonials and explore your avenues to pursue research in one of the world’s leading countries for chemistry. Structure-Based Drug Design. Chemical Computing Group. Booth 1124. Wednesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Room 155. 3:45 PM to 4:45 PM. The course describes SBDD workflows in drug discovery projects and encompasses a range of topics from pharmacophore query generation to protein-ligand interaction fingerprints. More specifically, the course will cover the application of pharmacophores in the context of protein-ligand docking, scaffold replacement and R-group screening. A method for querying a 3D project database will also be presented along with the generation and analysis of protein-ligand interaction fingerprints (PLIF).

Harnessing the Power of Benchtop NMR in Your Lab. Magritek. Booth 1901. Tuesday. Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Exhibit Hall A, Expo Theater 2. 12:00 PM to 2:15 PM. • “Implementation of Benchtop NMR into a Manufacturing Environment,” Dr. Travis Gregar, PhD, Advanced Research Specialist, 3M Corporate Research and Development • “Sodium NMR experiments on Spinsolve,” Guillaume Madelin, PhD, Assistant Professor, New York University • “Use of benchtop NMR to resolve over the counter analgesics: an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory,” Ryan Blough, Immaculata University • “Advances in reaction monitoring with benchtop NMR,” Dr. Andrew Coy, Magritek Inc. • TBD: PPG, Andy Surface?

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WORKSHOPS

Workshops

EXHIBITOR LIST

Exhibitor List

Accela ChemBio Co. Ltd............................................. 2027

ACS Web Strategy & Operations................................... 222

Anasazi Instruments Inc............................................. 912

www.accelachem.com Accela ChemBio focues on the design, synthesis, manufacture and marketing of advanced R&D chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates.

www.acs.org

www.aiinmr.com Anasazi Instruments, Inc. is the leading manufacturer of high field permanent magnet based NMR instruments along with the undisputed leader in resolution and sensitivity.

Ace Glass, Inc...........................................................1015

www.acs.org www.acs.org is the official website of the American Chemical Society and your one-stop shop to access everything ACS has to offer. Stop by the ACS Web booth, take a survey, and give us your feedback.

www.aceglass.com Ace Glass Inc has been a leader in scientific glass and lab equipment for over 80 years. Ace Glass provides quality US manufactured custom scientific glassware, including reactors from up to 200L.

Acrotein ChemBio Inc................................................. 719 www.acrotein.com Acrotein ChemBio Inc is a leading supplier and manufacturer of special research chemicals with 8000+ compounds in stock: Unnatural amino acids, organic acid, amine, heterocycles and inhibitors, etc.

CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

ACS Web Strategy & Operations..................................1418

Adam Equipment........................................................ 922 www.adamequipment.com For more than 45 years, professionals worldwide have relied on Adam Equipment for a wide selection of dependable weighing equipment. Adam provides the right balance of speed, performance and value.

AdValue Technology....................................................2015

www.acs.org

www.advaluetech.com Specialized in Alumina, Fused Quartz, Sapphire and Zirconia. Large stock of crucibles, tubes and plates. Also offer custom parts, high purity powders, ceramic membrane, laser machining and metallization.

ACS Division of Small Chemical Businesses (SCHB)..... 1732

Advanced ChemBlocks Inc..........................................1019

ACS Benefits, Programs, Services...............................1418 www.acs.org

ACS Career Navigator................................................1418

www.acs-schb.org SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

SCHB serves as clearinghouse of information, a forum for discussion, and liaison between chemical business and students. SCHB actively seeks collaboration with other ACS units and external partners.

ACS Education...........................................................1418 www.acs.org/education ACS Education Division serves learners and educators by building communities and providing education resources, grants, professional development opportunities, and guidelines.

ACS Green Chemistry Institute...................................1418 www.acs.org/gci

ACS Human Resouces................................................. 413 www.acs.org CAREER FAIR BOOTH

ACS Member Insurance Program.................................1418 www.acs.org/insurance Explore a wide array of insurance solutions available to ACS members, such as life and disability insurance, auto and homeowners, long-term care, professional liability, and more.

ACS Membership.......................................................1418 www.acs.org/memberhandbook

ACS Northeastern Section......................................... 2328 ACS Publications.......................................................1418

www.achemblock.com

Advanced Chemistry Development (ACD/Labs)............... 508 www.acdlabs.com

Advion..................................................................... 1908 www.advion.com Using our deep scientific and engineering knowledge of mass spectrometry and microfluidics, we create quality, flexible and fit-for-purpose solutions for life science and related industries.

AGI USA Inc.............................................................. 2224 www.asahiglassplant.com AGI is a scientific glassware manufacturer. Products include Rotary, Thin Film/Short Path Evaporators, Pressure, Filter and Nutsche Filter Reactors, Distillation, Liquid Extraction, Mini Plants.

Agilent Technologies..................................................1612

Anton Paar USA........................................................ 1221 www.anton-paar.com Anton Paar produces high-quality measuring and analysis instruments for laboratory, research and industrial applications. In the fields of density and concentration measurement, we are the world leader.

Arbutus Biopharma Inc............................................... 228 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Ark Pharm, Inc......................................................... 1529 Since 2007, Ark Pharm has been a leading supplier of research chemistry to pharmaceutical companies, universities, biotech companies, healthcare industries, contract research organizations, etc.

Art Robbins Instruments............................................ 532 SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Asahi Spectra Co., Ltd................................................1113 www.asahi-spectra.com We will exhibit optical filters and the MAX-350, which is useful for photochemical and photocatalytic studies such as artificial photosynthesis, photoisomerization, water splitting and so on.

Ascendia Pharmaceuticals........................................... 727 Astatech, Inc.............................................................. 818 www.astatechinc.com

AstraZeneca............................................................... 225 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments Company..... 1024 www.oxford-instruments.com/afm Asylum Research, the technology leader in AFM, features the Cypher VRS, the first and only full-featured video-rate AFM imaging at 625 lines/second with easy operation and advanced capabilities.

AIP Publishing — The Journal of Chemical Physics........1912

Asynt, Ltd.................................................................. 825

www.jcp.aip.org The Journal of Chemical Physics publishes quantitative and rigorous science of long-lasting value in methods and applications of chemical physics.

Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC)............ 308 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

AK Scientific, Inc........................................................ 515

ACS Regional Meetings..............................................1418

www.aksci.com Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, AK Scientific has served scientists and researchers nationally and globally for over ten years with quality-backed specialty and fine chemicals.

www.asynt.com Asynt is a manufacturer of novel equipment for chemistry laboratories — we focus on clean, safe, effective, spaceefficient and sustainable tools. Product lines include DrySyn, CondenSyn, ReactoMate.

BASF Corporation................................................130, 230 www.basf.us CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

BASF Corporation....................................................... 330 www.basf.us CAREER FAIR BOOTH

Aldlab Chemicals, LLC................................................2127

Bellen Chemistry........................................................ 725

www.aldlab.com

www.bellenchem.com

Alichem Inc................................................................ 813

Bentham Sciences Publishers Ltd.............................. 2223

www.acs.org/meetings

www.alichem.com

ACS Senior Chemists................................................ 2028

American Physical Society........................................... 713

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Andor is a global leader in the development and manufacturing of high-performance scientific cameras, spectroscopy solutions and microscopy systems to match your application needs in research and OEM.

www.agilent.com/chem Agilent is your global partner for sample preparation, chromatography, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis, molecular spectroscopy, laboratory software, service, and supplies. www.agilent.com

www.pubs.acs.org FLAG ACS Publications is the most trusted, most cited, most read publisher in chemistry and related sciences. Visit our booth to learn more about ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, ACS eBooks, and to celebrate the 140th anniversary of the Journal of the American Chemical Society! Visit with C&EN to learn about this year’s Talented 12 and what is new with the world’s most comprehensive and authoritative news source in chemistry and related fields.

The Senior Chemists Committee engages ACS members ages 50 and above who would like to remain active and offer their experience and expertise to younger chemists, students, and the chemical profession.

Andor Technology......................................................1021

www.journals.aps.org The American Physical Society is a non-profit membership society and publisher of the Physical Review journals. Visit booth 713 to learn about the research published in our journals.

www.benthamscience.com Bentham Science Publishers is a major STM journal and e-book publisher, helping to answer the information needs of the pharmaceutical and biomedical research community.

As of 7/20/2018

Carney, Sandoe & Associates....................................... 312

www.berryassoc.com Berry & Associates is a specialty chemical company that offers nucleosides, nucleoside analogs, modified nucleoside phosphoramidites, solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis supports, stable isotopes.

www.carneysandoe.com

Beyond Benign......................................................... 2732

CAS..........................................................................1418

www.beyondbenign.org

www.cas.org FLAG CAS is a global organization of expert scientists, technologists and business leaders offering products, like SciFinder® and STN® and scientific and technology solutions for your specific needs.

BioChromato............................................................ 1728 www.biochromato.com

BioCryst Pharmaceuticals Inc...................................... 221

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

Carney, Sandoe & Associates is an educational recruitment firm that matches teachers and administrators with jobs at K-12 independent schools worldwide, since 1977.

CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Cell Press................................................................ 1508

Biotage....................................................................2115

Cell Press is the home for seminal and insightful chemistry research, showcasing how fundamental studies in chemistry and sub-disciplines may help find solutions to the global challenges of tomorrow.

www.biotage.com Biotage is a global Life Science company that develops innovative and effective solutions for separation within organic and analytical chemistry, as well as for industrial applications.

CEM Corp..................................................................1815

BrandTech Scientific..................................................1118 www.brandtech.com BrandTech® Scientific offers lab equipment including the BRAND® LHS pipetting robot and liquid handling products; VACUUBRAND vacuum pumps; VITLAB plastics; BLAUBRAND glassware; and BOCHEM support jacks.

Brewer Science, Inc.................................................... 219 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Brewer Science is a global technology leader in developing and manufacturing innovative materials and processes for the fabrication of semiconductors and microelectronic devices.

Brewer Science, Inc.................................................... 313

www.cem.com CEM is a leading provider of innovative, advanced microwave laboratory systems for chemical synthesis, sample preparation, and bioscience applications.

Chemglass Life Sciences........................................... 2208 www.cglifesciences.com

Chemical Computing Group........................................1124 www.chemcomp.com FLAG CCG is a leading supplier of software solutions for life sciences. CCG’s main software is MOE, which is used by computational chemists, medicinal chemists and biologists throughout the world.

Chemrus Inc............................................................ 1232 www.chemrus.com

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Brewer Science is a global technology leader in developing and manufacturing innovative materials and processes for the fabrication of semiconductors and microelectronic devices.

Chemrus developed the world’s first disposable filter funnel for solid-liquid separation and reaction flasks, which can be kept upright on the bench without the use of cork rings.

Bristol-Myers Squibb.................................................. 409 We are a global biopharmaceutical company whose mission is to discover, develop and deliver innovative medicines that help patients prevail over serious diseases.

www.chemshuttle.com Founded in 2010 by medicinal chemists for chemists, ChemShuttle is a premier chemistry contract research organization (CRO) and research chemical supplier serving the life science community.

Brookhaven Instruments Corp................................... 1224

ChemSpace US Inc.................................................... 1727

Brookhaven Instruments provides techniques for particle size, zeta potential and molecular weight determination. Brookhaven’s instrumentation and expertise will help you get the results you need.

www.chem-space.com Chemspace is the largest online catalog that covers all available drug discovery-relevant chemical space of building blocks, fragments and screening compounds in the world.

Bruker....................................................................... 708

Chengdu Aslee Biopharmaceuticals, Inc...................... 1025

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

www.bruker.com A leading analytical instrumentation company, Bruker offers a wide range of applications in chemistry and life sciences as well as solutions for materials research and nanotechnology.

Chemshuttle.............................................................. 822

www.asleechem.com

Cintas Corporation................................................... 1829 STAR

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona........... 415

CombiPhos Catalysts, Inc...........................................1121

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

Cal Poly Pomona is part of the California State University system, is among two polytechnic universities in California, and is strongly committed to scholarship, research, and student achievement.

www.combiphos.com CombiPhos Catalysts, Inc. markets unstable intermediates: pyridine-2-boronic acids, thiazole-4-boronic acids, imidazole4-boronic acids, pyrazine-2-boronic acids, and novel deuterium reagents.

Camag Scientific, Inc................................................ 1028

CONFLEX Corp...........................................................1116

FLAG

www.camagusa.com CAMAG is the leader in instrumental Thin-Layer Chromatography. We provide high-end instruments, tools and concepts for TLC/HPTLC. We support our customers with training, technical and lab services.

www.conflex.net CONFLEX permits fast, accurate, automated conformation searching and analysis critical to drug discovery, chemical engineering and material design. Also, crystal structure calculation and search.

Cambridge Crystallographic Data Ctr......................... 1227

COSMOlogic GmbH & Co. KG.......................................2619

www.ccdc.cam.ac.uk The CCDC is dedicated to the support of chemistry and crystallography for the public benefit, through the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD), the word’s repository for small molecule structural data.

CP Lab Safety............................................................2319

Carbosynth LLC.......................................................... 812 www.carbosynth.com Carbosynth is one of the largest suppliers of carbohydrates, nucleosides and fine chemicals. We also offer custom synthesis services.

www.cosmologic.de www.cplabsafety.com Emery Pharma is a CRO, specializing in chemistry, microbiology, and general cGMP/GLP or R&D support. CP Lab Safety offers a large selection of safety ECO Funnels, customized with HPLC and port caps.

Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics............................ 310

Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences................................................... 410 Dalian University of Technology, Zhang Dayu School of Chemistry................................................... 121 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Dalian University of Technology, Zhang Dayu School of Chemistry................................................... 416 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

Delong America.......................................................... 609 www.lv-em.com Delong is proud to be the world leader in benchtop Low Voltage Electron Microscopes (LVEM) and the only company offering Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM) in a benchtop format.

Ebatco......................................................................1129 www.ebatco.com Ebatco is an ISO 17025 accredited independent testing lab. Supporting R&D and product testing, Ebatco delivers high quality solutions for your analytical and characterization needs.

Edinburgh Instruments............................................. 1808 www.edinst.com Edinburgh Instruments is the global leader in the development and manufacturing of fluorescence spectrometers, transient absorption spectrometers, picosecond laser sources and gas laser systems.

Elsevier................................................................... 1509 www.elsevier.com Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps institutions and professionals advance healthcare, open science and improve performance for the benefit of humanity.

Extrel CMS................................................................1416 www.extrel.com Extrel is the world’s leading manufacturer of research and process mass spectrometers, residual gas analyzers, and quadrupole mass spectrometry components.

EZLife Bio Inc........................................................... 1528 www.ezlife.bio EZLife Bio Inc. is crafting the future of molecular testing. EZLife’s EFIRM technology uses multiplexed electrochemical biosensors and conducting polymers to streamline molecular testing.

Faster Chemistry LLC................................................ 1632 SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Forget the separatory funnel with FastWoRX™! Replace time- and solvent-wasting liquid-liquid extractions with a simple solids separation. Work-ups in half the time or less and no emulsions.

Formulaction USA..................................................... 1809 www.formulaction.com Formulaction showcases the Turbiscan line of devices for stability analysis, the Rheolaser line of instruments for rheology measurements, and the Fluidicam RHEO for rapid viscosity acquisition.

Fulbright Scholar Program.......................................... 728 www.cies.org

Galbraith Laboratories Inc.........................................2510 www.galbraith.com

Gamry Instruments.................................................. 2016 www.gamry.com

Gate Scientific, Inc................................................... 1532 www.gatescientific.com Star Award winning smartSENSE Wireless Temperature sensing Stir-Bar and Hotplate workstation with pH sensing and WiFi remote access — Formulations, Reactions and Titrations made easier than ever.

www.dicp.ac.cn

Star 

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

FLAG Sponsor

New Exhibitor

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EXHIBITOR LIST

Berry & Associates................................................... 1628

EXHIBITOR LIST

As of 7/20/2018

Gaussian..................................................................1215

InfoChem GmbH........................................................1916

KRUSS Scientific Instruments, Inc............................. 1427

www.gaussian.com Gaussian is the world leader in electronic structure computational chemistry programs. The Gaussian series of programs are available on every major computing environment, from PCs to supercomputers.

www.infochem.de InfoChem is a software company offering cheminformatics tools. Main activities are synthesis planning, reaction prediction and automatic extraction of scientific information from text and images.

www.krussusa.com As the world’s leading supplier of measuring instruments for surface and interfacial tension, our offer is a combination of technology and scientific consulting.

GERSTEL Inc..............................................................2419

InnoStudio Inc..........................................................1616

www.gerstelus.com Manufacturer of sample prep workstations and integrated analytical solutions for LC, GC, GC/MS, and LC/MS designed to optimize performance, enhance productivity, and extend laboratory capabilities.

Our company is specialized in high-risk and high-potential technical innovation. Our studios are focusing towards nanotechnology, bringing flow chemistry and other chemical technology to the space.

Getson & Schatz, P.C.................................................. 309 www.researchergreencard.com

FLAG

CAREER FAIR BOOTH

GSK........................................................................... 227 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Hamby Law Firm — Patents....................................... 2625 hambylaw.com

Star

Harrick Scientific......................................................1127 Manufacturer of a complete line of IR-UV Vis spectroscopy accessories. Includes a large selection of diamond ATR, heated and high-pressure cells.

Harvard Apparatus................................................... 2308 www.harvardapparatus.com Harvard Apparatus offers a broad selection of syringe, peristaltic and continuous flow pumps. Featuring accurate flow with reduced setup time using the intuitive touch screen and icon interface.

Heidolph North America............................................ 1708 www.heidolphna.com Heidolph North America’s focus is on providing unparalleled sales and support of premium lab equipment. Heidolph specializes in rotary evaporation, overhead stirrers, and magnetic hotplate stirrers.

Hellma USA...............................................................1013 www.hellma.com Hellma is the world leader in the market of optical analysis technology for optical components in quartz. Its highquality precision allows for reliable measurement results in production, QC and research.

HepatoChem Inc......................................................... 632 www.hepatochem.com SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Hiden Analytical Inc...................................................1115 www.hidenanalytical.com Hiden Analytical manufactures precision mass spectrometers for gas analysis, materials characterization and surface science. Showcasing our Catlab system for catalysis studies.

HORIBA Scientific..................................................... 1027 www.horiba.com/scientific HORIBA Scientific: Raman spectroscopy, hybrid-modulartransmission, AFM-Raman. Optical components, scientific cameras, light sources, CCDs/detectors. Custom solutions: modular Raman, TR-PL, CL, VUV.

HP, Inc....................................................................... 232 CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Huateng Pharma........................................................ 722 www.chemreagents.com

IBM Research GmBH................................................... 530 IKA Works, Inc...........................................................1108 www.ika.com IKA laboratory technology offers a wide range of innovative equipment for numerous applications in research and development.

Imperia Engineering Partners................................... 2128 www.imperiaep.com Imperia’s interdisciplinary team of engineers, scientists, and technical specialists matched with a top-notch facility goes beyond standard laboratory analyses in order to tackle challenging problems.

Inert......................................................................... 621 www.inerttechnology.com

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Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences........ 410 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

L’Oréal USA................................................................ 408 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

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LABCONCO, Corp......................................................... 913 www.labconco.com Since 1925 Labconco Corporation has manufactured the highest quality laboratory equipment. They will be displaying a glove box, glassware washer and freeze dryer at this year’s ACS meeting.

IntelliSyn................................................................. 1627

LabX Media Group.................................................... 2621

www.intellisynrd.com

www.labxmediagroup.com LabX Media Group is an information and marketing company that provides scientific intelligence and marketing solutions to researchers seeking to discover new ideas and approaches for their labs.

Star

Interchim Inc............................................................2418 www.interchiminc.com Manufactures chromatographic instruments to support prep HPLC, MPLC and flash. Enhancements include MS, ELSD, conductivity and RI. Column product range comprised of prep HPLC, flash, MPLC, SPE, and HPLC.

IOP Publishing..........................................................2132 www.ioppublishing.org SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Lhasa Limited........................................................... 2422 www.lhasalimited.org Lhasa Limited, a pioneer in developing software that delivers scientifically robust results. Including Mirabilis, for purge factors, Zeneth for degradation, and Derek and Sarah Nexus, for toxicology.

IOP Publishing provides a range of journals, ebooks, conference proceedings, and digital products services covering research in the physical sciences and beyond.

LinkedIn............................................................. 118, 119

Janis Research Company, LLC......................................1128

LS Instruments AG................................................... 2425

www.janis.com Cryogenic research equipment for FTIR, Mossbauer, microRaman, micro-PL, UV/visible and NMR spectroscopy; DAC; nanoscale applications. Visit our booth to speak with a qualified applications scientist.

www.lsinstruments.ch LS Instruments makes high-quality light scattering instruments for multi-angle Static and Dynamic Light Scattering (MADLS/DLS/SLS) along with microrheology using Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy (DWS).

Japan Analytical Industry Co. Ltd................................. 832

Lubrizol Corporation................................................... 224

www.jai.co.jp/english/index.html

www.lubrizol.com

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

JASCO...................................................................... 1825

M. BRAUN, Inc...........................................................2412

www.jascoinc.com

www.mbraun.com MBRAUN is a leading manufacturer of high-end solutions including inertgas gloveboxes and gas purification systems, high-end vacuum deposition systems and a complete line of integrated process tools.

JEOL USA, Inc............................................................. 218 www.jeolusa.com CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

JEOL is a world leader in analytical instrumentation including: Liquids and Solids NMR, MALDI and MALDI imaging MS, RT Gas Analysis/MS, GC/MS, DART/MS, SEM, TEM, Auger, and EPMA.

JEOL USA, Inc........................................................... 1608 www.jeolusa.com JEOL is a world leader in analytical instrumentation including: Liquids and Solids NMR, MALDI and MALDI imaging MS, RT Gas Analysis/MS, GC/MS, DART/MS, SEM, TEM, Auger, and EPMA.

J-KEM Scientific.........................................................1212 www.jkem.com

Keit Spectrometers..................................................... 612 www.keit.co.uk Keit provides in-line process analysis of liquids with rugged IRmadillo FTIR spectrometer. Certified safe for use in hazardous environments, it enables real-time reaction analysis for manufacturers.

KembloX.................................................................. 1832 www.kemblox.wordpress.com SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

KembloX — educational tool for modeling aspects of the chemistry of ionic compounds, by visual and tactile means, hence the motto make the hands see™.

CAREER FAIR PRIVATE MEETING ROOM

Macherey-Nagel Inc.................................................. 1827 www.mn-net.com MACHEREY-NAGEL — founded in 1911 — is a specialty manufacturer of chromatography products for HPLC, GC, TLC and SPE. Our NUCLEOSIL® brand is still used in many methods today.

Magritek Inc.............................................................1910 www.magritek.com Magritek is the global leader in manufacturing cryogen-free benchtop NMR spectrometers with the highest sensitivity and resolution available in the analytical instrument market.

Malvern PANalytical.................................................. 2508 www.malvern.com Malvern Panalytical’s advanced technologies help characterize proteins and biomolecules from basic research to drug formulation: DLS, DSC, ITC, MDRS, SEC/GPC, NTA, TDA, RMM, XRD, XRF, and Rheology.

Maruzen Co., Ltd.......................................................1512 www.maruzen.info/hgs Maruzen International Co., Ltd (MIC) is the leading distributor of globally renowned HGS Molecular Model. The company is located in Secaucus, NJ. Manufactured in Japan.

Materials Research Society....................................... 2228

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

An interdisciplinary scientific society renowned for its Spring and Fall Meetings, MRS is your home to present and publish in the most important and rapidly advancing fields of materials research.

KNF Neuberger..........................................................1415

mcule.com Kft.......................................................... 1527

Key Organics Inc...................................................... 1932 www.keyorganicsinc.com

www.knfusa.com Visit KNF for the latest in laboratory vacuum pumps and systems, rotary evaporators, and liquid pumps. Be sure to enter our Count the Skittles contest for your chance to win Sony wifi headphones!

www.mcule.com

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As of 7/20/2018

Mystaire.................................................................... 721

Organix Inc.............................................................. 2324

www.future-science-group.com MedChemNet is a free-to-access online community encompassing all aspects of the drug discovery pipeline, focusing on the design and preclinical testing of small molecules for the treatment of disease.

www.mystaire.com

www.organixinc.com Organix conducts Contract Research in Synthetic Organic and Medicinal Chemistry. We provide services at the discovery end of drug discovery. Organix owns and operates a state-of-the-art facility.

Mestrelab Research SL............................................... 624

www.nanohub.org nanoHUB.org hosts free online simulation tools, online presentations, cutting-edge nanoHUB-U short courses, and more.

www.mestrelab.com Mestrelab Research provides easy-to-use applications for basic or advanced NMR and LC/GC/MS data processing, analysis, and reporting. Stop by booth #624 to see the latest in our Mnova and Mbook software.

Metrohm USA, Inc.................................................... 2221 www.metrohmusa.com

Mettler-Toledo North America...................................... 815 www.mt.com METTLER TOLEDO is a leading global manufacturer of precision instruments and is the world’s largest manufacturer and marketer of weighing instruments for use in laboratory applications.

MicroLAB, Inc............................................................2216 www.microlabinfo.com MicroLAB creates high resolution chemistry lab interface instruments serving freshman to undergraduate researchers. User-friendly software provides visualization and effective use of lab time.

Micromeritics Instrument Corp..................................1112 www.micromeritics.com Micromeritics manufactures and globally distributes automated analytical laboratory instruments that measure physical characteristics of powders and solids.

Microyn Technologies Inc.......................................... 2332 www.microyntech.com Star Microyn Technologies Inc. is a supplier of scientific instruments and consumables. We strive to provide reliable products at competitive prices to help research and development to reach full potential.

Nanalysis Corp..........................................................1913 www.nanalysis.com

nanoHUB................................................................. 2622

Nanome..................................................................... 625 nanome.ai

Nanoscience Instruments...........................................2616 www.nanoscience.com

NASA......................................................................... 527 www.nasa.gov

National Library of Medicine..................................... 1927

neaspec GmbH........................................................... 724 www.neaspec.com neaspec is dedicated to delivering innovative solutions for nano-probe based optical and mechanical imaging and spectroscopy for advanced material characterization.

New Era Enterprises................................................... 608 www.newera-spectro.com Precision NMR sample tubes from micro to large diameter MRI cells, screw thread, tip-off, pressure valve, non-glass sample cells; capillary systems for limited sample; RDC sample prep devices.

NMX Research and Solutions Inc............................... 2532 Our ambition is to become a leader in NMR spectroscopy which, coupled with molecular biology, biochemistry and other biophysic tools, will allow for identification of seeds for innovative drugs.

MilliporeSigma..........................................................2218

NT-MDT AMERICA, INC............................................... 1228

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

MIT Press books and journals are known for their intellectual daring, scholarly standards, and distinctive styles. Stop by our booth to enjoy a 30% discount on all books.

Molecular Knowledge Systems..................................... 932 www.molecularknowledge.com SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

We provide: Cranium, software for physical property estimation; Synapse, software for chemical product design; consulting services for chemical product innovation.

Molymod Models — Spiring Ltd.................................... 610 www.molymod.com Molymod® Molecular and atomic models, made in Sussex, England, by Spiring Enterprises Ltd, for chemistry and biochem at school, college, or university. Purchase directly or via approved US-based distributors.

Monsanto................................................................ 1625 www.monsanto.com

MPD Chemicals.........................................................2515 www.mpdchemicals.com MPD Chemicals is a US-based manufacturer of specialty chemicals including: unique monomers, polymer development, organosilicon chemistries, ligands, organometallics, and stable isotope labeling.

Oxford University Press.............................................. 924

Paraza Pharma Inc....................................................2516

www.nsf.gov

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

www.mitpress.mit.edu

www.oxford-instruments.com/pulsar Pulsar is a high-resolution, 60MHz benchtop NMR spectrometer, providing 1- and 2-D NMR spectra of 1H, 19F, 13C and other nuclei.

National Science Foundation..................................... 2624

www.milestonesci.com Milestone, a leader in microwave sample prep provides innovative solutions for microwave digestion, solvent extraction, mercury analysis, synthesis, ashing, acid purification & acid system cleaning.

MIT Press................................................................ 2032

Oxford Instruments.................................................. 1022

www.oup.com/us Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University’s objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

www.nmxresearch.com

MilliporeSigma provides scientists with best-in-class lab materials, technologies and services. EMD Millipore and Sigma-Aldrich, we now have a broad portfolio of 300,000 products and a global footprint.

www.originlab.com Origin is an industry-leading graphing and data analysis software for science and engineering. Extend Origin’s graphing and analysis capabilities by installing Apps from the OriginLab website.

www.nlm.nih.gov The National Library of Medicine provides FREE Internet access to its environmental health, toxicology, chemical, and hazardous substances resources.

Milestone, Inc.......................................................... 2325

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OriginLab Corp......................................................... 2227

www.ntmdt.com

Oak Ridge National Laboratory.................................... 412 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the largest DOE science and energy laboratory, conducting basic and applied research to deliver transformative solutions to compelling problems in energy and security.

Oakwood Products Inc.............................................. 1008 www.oakwoodchemical.com Oakwood Chemical, a manufacturer and distributor, supplies research chemicals to the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research communities. The Oakwood listing contains over 208,000 items.

Ocean Optics, Inc.......................................................1515 www.oceanoptics.com Ocean Optics is the applied spectral knowledge company. We offer UV-Vis, NIR, MIR and Raman spectrometers; chemical sensors; multispectral sensors and cameras; and optical fibers and components.

OmegaChem Inc.........................................................2615 www.omegachem.com

www.parazapharma.com Premium drug discovery service provider with proven expertise in lead identification and optimization leading to drug candidates (medicinal chemistry, bioassays, DMPK, scale up and biology).

Park Systems, Inc.....................................................1010 www.parkafm.com Park Systems is a manufacturer of atomic force microscopy (AFM) systems with a range of products for the materials research, semiconductor, and storage industries. Learn more at www.parksystems.com.

Parker Autoclave Engineers....................................... 2230 www.autoclaveengineers.com Star Stirred and Non-Stirred Reaction Pressure Vessels with ASME code Stamp or CE Mark. MagneDrive Packless Agitator — variety of blades for mixing or catalyst baskets for spinning. zero leakage.

Parr Instrument Co.................................................. 1408 www.parrinst.com Extensive product line includes stirred reactors, pressure vessels, high pressure tubular reactors, reactor systems, oxygen bomb calorimeters, sample preparation vessels and cell disruption vessels.

Particle Sizing Systems............................................ 1428 www.pssnicomp.com

PASCO scientific........................................................2415 www.pasco.com PASCO, the award-winning leader in hands-on, inquiry-based science, transforms science education and student learning with innovative probeware, software, and curriculum.

Patheon Pharmaceuticals............................................ 315 CAREER FAIR BOOTH

PCI Synthesis........................................................... 1729 www.pcisynthesis.com

PerkinElmer Environmental Health.............................. 927 PerkinElmer, Inc. is a global leader focused on improving the health and safety of people and their environment.

Pharmablock USA, Inc................................................1012 www.pharmablock.com

Omicron Biochemicals, Inc........................................ 2632 www.omicronbio.com SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Omicron develops methods to introduce stable isotopes, 13C, 2H, 15N and 18O, into carbohydrates, nucleosides/ nucleotides, and sugar-nucleotides. We also offer rare sugars, N-glycan and O-glycan.

ORAU/ORISE............................................................... 316 www.orau.org/maryland

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49

EXHIBITOR LIST

MedChemNet.............................................................. 512

EXHIBITOR LIST

As of 7/20/2018

PharmAgra Labs, Inc................................................. 2232

Renishaw Inc........................................................... 2322

Specac, Ltd...............................................................1122

www.pharmagra.com

www.renishaw.com/raman Renishaw is a recognized leader in Raman spectroscopy, producing high-performance Raman systems for a range of applications.

www.specac.com Specac is a high quality manufacturer of FTIR accessories and sample preparation products, bringing new and innovative solutions to the market place working in a number of different areas.

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

PharmAgra Labs is a chemistry CRO that for nineteen years has been conducting contract R&D in organic chemistry for a wide variety of industries including pharma/biotech (cGMP for CTM) and Electronics.

Photothermal Spectroscopy Corp................................. 928 www.photothermal.com

PIKE Technologies..................................................... 2013

Research In Germany................................................ 2025 www.dfg.de

Rigaku Americas Corp................................................1915 www.rigaku.com

www.piketech.com Spectroscopy Sampling Solutions. PIKE Technologies specializes in the development and manufacture of FTIR, NIR and UV-Vis accessories that enhance the performance of commercial spectrometers.

Risk and Safety Solutions........................................... 525

Pine Research Instrumentation................................. 2012

Royal Society of Chemistry....................................... 2008

www.pineresearch.com

Planta Analytica........................................................2518 www.plantaanalytica.com Star Planta Analytica is a leading provider in high-performance separation services including compound isolation and method development, process scale-up, and comprehensive natural product development.

PLOS......................................................................... 712

Star

PLOS (Public Library of Science) is a nonprofit Open Access publisher, innovator and advocacy organization dedicated to accelerating progress in science and medicine.

Prestwick Chemical...................................................2519 www.prestwickchemical.com Star Prestwick Chemical is a MedChem company providing unique smart chemical screening libraries (FDA drugs, Drug Fragments and medicinal chemistry services for the early stage of drug discovery.

PROTO Manufacturing................................................1114 [emailprotected] See how a PROTO Benchtop X-ray Powder Diffractometer can be integrated into your laboratory for exploring the behavior of your materials under gas environments, high-pressure and temperature.

Proton OnSite...........................................................2410 www.protononsite.com Proton OnSite is a leading manufacturer of laboratory on-site gas generators. We offer safe, affordable and high-performance gas generation solutions for the LCMS and GC lab market.

Pure Process Technology............................................. 828 www.pureprocesstechnology.com Pure Process Technology is a full-service OEM engineering purification process equipment with standard and custom systems in 3 categories: (1) solvent purification, (2) solvent dispensing, and (3) water purification.

PurePEG, LLC........................................................... 1828 www.purepeg.com/default.aspx

Quantachrome Corp...................................................1130 www.quantachrome.com

Quantum Analytics...................................................... 915 www.lqa.com Quantum Analytics is a value-added distributor of analytical instrumentation in the US. We offer technical services, leasing/financing programs, and are an authorized Agilent Technologies distributor.

Rachel Pricer Graphics LLC......................................... 732 www.rpricergraphics.com SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Rachel Pricer Graphics, LLC creates high-quality, thoughtfully designed scientific illustrations for presentations, posters, grants, and journal articles.

Regis Technologies................................................... 2321 www.registech.com Regis is a leading supplier of chromatography columns and reagents. Visit booth 2321 to learn about their new achiral SFC columns, chiral columns for LC and SFC, and specialty columns and reagents.

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www.riskandsafetysolutions.com

Roki S&S America Inc................................................2618 www.rokigrp.com www.rsc.org Our purpose is to advance excellence in the chemical sciences. Our expanding selection of journals, books, databases and magazines allows us to invest in the future of chemistry.

Schrödinger, Inc........................................................2112 www.schrodinger.com FLAG Schrödinger is a leading provider of advanced molecular simulations and enterprise software solutions and services for pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and materials research. Hands-on demos available.

SCICOL — Research Collaboration Made Simple............. 824 www.scicol.org SCICOL is the first platform dedicated to helping researchers find collaborators in a simple way and practically for free. It facilitates accessible, international and interdisciplinary collaboration.

Science/AAAS............................................................2318 www.aaas.org AAAS (The American Association for the Advancement of Science) publishes Science, a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journal, and offers programs and career development resources for scientists.

Sciencix..................................................................... 521 www.sciencix.com Sciencix has been a trusted provider of quality HPLC instrumentation products for over 30 years. Our products are equivalent to the corresponding OEM parts such as Agilent®, Waters® and Shimadzu®.

Scilligence Corporation............................................... 819 www.scilligence.com

Semichem.................................................................1214 www.semichem.com AMPAC™ is our semiempirical quantum mechanical program including an AGUI for building and visualization. CODESSA™ is our advanced QSAR program that ties information from AMPAC™ with experimental data.

Sentinel Process Systems – Uniqsis........................... 1432 SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Shimadzu Scientific Instruments Inc.......................... 1208 www.shimadzu.com Shimadzu is the leading provider of analytical measurement and testing instrumentation.

Software for Chemistry & Materials...........................1119 www.scm.com SCM scientists are passionate to make computational chemistry work for you. Advance your research with the ADF Modeling Suite. Come discuss modeling challenges and see the excellent GUI in action!

Sorbent Technologies.................................................1715 www.sorbtech.com Chromatography products. Silica gel, bonded silicas, aluminas, polymeric resins, gel filtration, SEC, TLC plates, flash cartridges and systems, syringe filters, SPE cartridges, HPLC, GC and FPLC columns.

Spectradyne LLC......................................................... 930 www.nanoparticleanalyzer.com Spectradyne has developed a high-resolution nanoparticle analyzer based on Microfluidic Resistive Pulse Sensing (MRPS), which overcomes the limitations found with light scattering-based methods.

SpectroLogix............................................................ 1430 www.bio-logic.us SpectroLogix uses many years of expertise in rapid mixing, kinetic and photosynthesis spectroscopy as a member of the Biologic family to focus on growth of our market leading line of RK products.

Spectrum Chemical Mfg Corp.....................................1810 www.spectrumchemical.com Spectrum manufactures and distributes over 45,000 fine chemicals and laboratory reagents in research and production quantities, including more than 1200 USP/NF/ FCC chemicals.

Springer Nature......................................................... 615 www.springernature.com Springer Nature is one of the world’s leading global research, educational and professional publishers, home of respected and trusted brands providing quality content

StellarNet Inc...........................................................1716 www.stellarnet.us StellarNet provides compact spectrometer systems for product analysis, research, education, and OEM. StellarNet instrumentation is rugged for any environment and covers a universe of applications.

STP America Research.............................................. 2424 www.stpharm.co.kr STP America Research is a process research and development service provider focusing on small scale crystallization with newly invented magnetic mechanical stirrer for vials. Mini-reactor, Crystal16.

Star

Strem Chemicals.......................................................2512 www.strem.com Strem Chemicals,Inc. manufactures and markets high-purity, specialty chemicals. Key products: catalysts, ligands, organometallics, CVD/ALD precursors and nanomaterials. ISO 9001 certified.

Surface Measurement Systems.................................... 921 www.surfacemeasurementsystems.com

Suven Life Sciences Limited...................................... 2327 www.suven.com

Synquest Laboratories, Inc.........................................1710 www.synquestlabs.com

TA Instruments.......................................................... 810 www.tainstruments.com

Taylor & Francis/CRC Press....................................... 2309 www.tandfonline.com Taylor & Francis/CRC Press partners with world-class authors. We’re one of the world’s leading publishers of academic chemistry journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works.

TCI America............................................................. 2408 www.tcichemicals.com With over 28,000 chemical reagents, TCI is a leading global manufacturer and supplier of specialty chemicals to the pharmaceutical, electronic, cosmetic, chemical, environmental and biotech industries.

TechnipFMC................................................................ 613 www.technipfmc.com Star Providing expertise in the scale-up, commercialization, marketing, and licensing of first-of-a-kind Process Technologies.

As of 7/20/2018

Vantage Resourcing Solutions, LLC.............................1132

Workrite Uniform Company....................................... 1425

www.isco.com Teledyne ISCO manufactures Flash and HPLC systems. Our product line includes instruments and accessories for the purification of organic compounds in normal-phase and reversed-phase separations.

www.vrs-us.com Star VRS Recruitment is an established staffing firm that places scientists, analysts, engineers, sales/marketing specialists, and lab managers with a multitude of laboratories and instrument vendors.

www.workritefrcp.com Workrite Uniform Company, a manufacturer of flameresistant FR and chemical splash protective CP clothing has the latest innovative FR/CP Lab Coat. Stop by booth #1425 and check out our new products.

Temple University School of Pharmacy....................... 2421

Vapourtec Ltd............................................................. 916

Wyatt Technology Corp................................................ 908

www.pharmacy.temple.edu Temple University School of Pharmacy is actively recruiting students interested in careers in pharmacy or PhDs in drug discovery sciences (medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaco*kinetics, etc.).

www.vapourtec.com Vapourtec Ltd is an innovative laboratory technology company based near Cambridge, UK. Vapourtec develops, manufactures and markets cutting-edge flow chemistry systems.

www.wyatt.com Wyatt Technology is the recognized leader in instrumentation for determining the absolute molar mass, size, charge and interactions of macromolecules and nanoparticles in solution.

TERA-print LLC......................................................... 1429

VELP SCIENTIFIC INC................................................. 2330

X-Ability Co., Ltd....................................................... 1032

www.tera-print.com TERA-print has developed a suite of nanofabrication tools that allow researchers to rapidly prototype nanoscaled patterns and devices with unmatched scalability, materials generality, and resolution.

www.velp.com

www.x-ability.com

ThalesNano Nanotechnology Inc..................................1615 www.thalesnano.com We are the world leader in bench-top flow chemistry reactors with widest portfolio of continuous process instruments for the pharma, biotech, fine chemical, petroleum/biofuel, and education markets.

The Chemical Society of Japan....................................1513 www.chemistry.or.jp/en We publish the journal ‘Chemistry Letters’ and ‘Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan’. Please visit our website www. journal.csj.jp/ and drop in at CSJ booth!!

Vernier Software & Technology...................................1218 www.vernier.com Vernier Software & Technology is the leading worldwide innovator of real-time data-collection, graphing, and analysis tools for science education.

Vigor Tech USA, LLC...................................................1110 www.vigor-glovebox.com Vigor is a world class glovebox and purification system company, specializing in creative technologies and custom research solutions. A Vigor glovebox is the best choice you can make for your research!

ViridisChem, Inc......................................................... 909 www.viridischem.com

VSPARTICLE B.V........................................................ 2432

The Electrochemical Society........................................ 718

www.vsparticle.com

www.electrochem.org Leading the world in electrochemistry and solid state science and technology since 1902, ECS is an international professional society with over 8,000 members from more than 75 countries.

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

Thermo Fisher Scientific............................................2312 www.thermoscientific.com Integrated laboratory workflow solutions including specialty chemicals, metals and materials, sample preparation, chromatography, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and molecular spectroscopy.

Thinky USA Inc........................................................... 821 www.thinky-usa.com Thinky is a leading manufacturer of Bubble-Free Planetary Centrifugal Mixers, which mix, disperse, and degas materials (0.5 g to 20 kg) in minutes with or without the use of vacuum.

University Science Books.......................................... 2409 www.uscibooks.com University Science Books publishes a great array of landmark titles in chemistry. Come visit us to peruse our newest releases, including “Foundations of Inorganic Chemistry” by Gary Wulfsberg.

US EPA Toxics Release Inventory Program.................. 1928 www.epa.gov/tri

Vacuubrand, Inc........................................................1018 www.vacuubrand.com VACUUBRAND offers exceptionally quiet, corrosion-resistant, oil-free vacuum pumps with ultra-long service intervals for labs, scale-up and OEM use.

Vacuum Atmospheres Co............................................. 918 www.vac-atm.com VAC has set the standard for gloveboxes and gas purification for over 50 years and continues to do so with our revolutionary design. No regeneration required by the user.

Vacuum Technology Inc............................................... 513 www.vti-glovebox.com Vacuum Technology Inc. manufactures best in class gloveboxes designed for application from R&D to Full Production. Our modular, customizable designs give you the best glovebox at the best value.

SMALL CHEMICAL BUSINESS & NON PROFIT

We are offering a molecular modeling software Winmostar and related add-ons to help chemists to produce many products.

Yamazen Science, Inc................................................ 1225 www.yamazenscience.com Yamazen, Japan’s #1 auto flash systems and hi-res columns. US patented SW gearing toward green chemistry: Fast (4CV), predictable run and low solvent use. ELSD, MS, TLC options.

Zaiput Flow Technologies............................................ 715 www.zaiput.com Zaiput brings to market unique liquid-liquid and gas-liquid technology design for chemistry applications. We offer a scalable solution suitable for both flow and batch chemistry applications.

VUV Analytics, Inc....................................................... 510 www.vuvanalytics.com VUV Analytics manufactures universal vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectroscopic detectors that provide a new dimension of chemical analysis accuracy.

W.W. Norton............................................................... 910 www.wwnorton.com

Waters Corp............................................................... 808 www.waters.com Waters Corp., the world’s leading specialty measurement company, has pioneered chromatography, mass spec and thermal analysis innovations serving the life, materials and food sciences for 60 years.

Wavefunction, Inc......................................................1812 www.wavefun.com Wavefunction produces Spartan and Odyssey software, cutting edge molecular modeling applications for use in research and education. Spartan’18 Parallel Suite is launching this summer!

Welch by Gardner Denver............................................ 827 www.welchvacuum.com Applied vacuum technology experts. From rotovaps, concentrators, schlenk lines, freeze dryers, filtration, to vacuum drying, Welch can help you apply the right vacuum solution.

Wiley....................................................................... 2212 www.wiley.com Wiley’s product diversity spans books, journals, databases, web-portals and workflow tools. Visit us to learn what’s new at Wiley, browse our books, and receive 30% off orders and FREE worldwide shipping!

Wilmad-LabGlass........................................................ 716 www.wilmad-labglass.com Wilmad-LabGlass brand laboratory glassware offers NMR and EPR consumables, specialty glassware, as well as custom fabrication for individual glassware, glass repair services and OEM glass parts.

Wilmington PharmaTech.............................................. 519 www.wilmingtonpharmatech.com

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51

EXHIBITOR LIST

Teledyne Isco — Chromatography................................1412

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Technical Program Summary

PRES

Presidential Events

P. Dorhout, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center/ Sheraton Boston Hotel

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward **

S D

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students **

A

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers ** NNB

D

Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in Honor of Barbara Belmont *(PROF)

P

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond Opening Session *(MPPG)

P

Chemistry as a Second Language: Strategies for Global Scientific Communication *(YCC)

M Tu W Th

P. Weiss, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Nanoscience & Nanotechnology in Neuroscience & the BRAIN Initiative

A

ACS Nano Lectureship Award NNB

A

Nano in Tissue Engineering

A

Nanophotonics NNB

D D

Patterson-Crane Award Symposium

P

The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative **

P

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier *(ANYL)

D D D

Recent Developments in the Protection of Nanotechnology-Related Intellectual Property *(CHAL)

MCPD & Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters

The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative *(MPPG)

P

Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group

MP P G P. Weiss, Program Chair

S

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy **

D D

M Tu W Th

NNB

AG FD X. Fan, Program Chair

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

D

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

A

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry

A

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science *(ENVR)

MPPG

New Advances in 3D Nanoprinting NNB

P

Artificial Intelligence & its Impact on the Chemical Enterprise *(YCC)

Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group (continued)

S D

M Tu W Th

Bioactives & Neurodegenerative Diseases **

D

Functional Foods **

D

Health-Promoting Food Ingredients

D

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas **

E

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials **

E

D A

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome **

E

D

E

D D A

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond Opening Session ** NNB

P

General Posters

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Harvesting & Storage

P

Applied Nanotechnology for Food & Agriculture **

A

Structure & Assembly of Food Biopolymers **

D A

Bioactives & Skin Health **

D

Get Published: Panel Discussion with JAFC Editors **

P

Sci-Mix

E

Spotlight on Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond in the Journal of the American Chemical Society NNB

A

2018 C&EN Talented 12

A

Future of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond NNB

P

The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture

52

Young Scientist/JAFC Best Paper Awards **

A

E

Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship **

A

E

Taste & Aroma Modulators: Chemistry, Biology & Sensory

D D

General Papers

P

A

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry (continued)

AGFD X. Fan, Program Chair

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Food Bioactives, Nanotechnology & Other Delivery Systems ** NNB AGFD Award Symposium in Honor of Dr. Sevim Erhan **

S

M Tu W Th

AG FD X. Fan, Program Chair

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

P

Legal Aspects of Agriculture, Agrochemicals & Agribusiness *(AGRO)

A

P

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production *(AGRO)

A

Food Proteins: Structure, Functionality, Bioactivity & Safety

A

AG RO

Division of Agrochemicals

J. Eble, Program Chair

Chemistry & Health Benefits of Natural Foods & Beverages

P

Advances in Methods & Protocols for Food Pathogen & Toxin Detection

A

P A

CRISPR ** Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels *(AGRO)

D

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management *(AGRO)

D

P P

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production *(CHAS)

A

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies *(AGRO)

A

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles *(AGRO)

D

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development : New Trends & Best Practices *(AGRO)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

D

P

P

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

How Can Advances in Chemistry Improve Human Health Exposure Assessment? **

M Tu W Th

A

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels **

D

P

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management **

D

P

INSecticide TARgets (INSTAR) Summit

D

P

Environmental Fate, Transport & Modeling of Agriculturally Related Chemicals

D

P

Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments **

P

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation **

A

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies **

A

Reducing Uncertainty in Modeling the Environmental & Human Health Exposure to Agrochemicals **

A

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides *(AGRO)

D D

D

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of George P. Lahm *(AGRO)

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles **

D D

Process Research & Development in Crop Protection

D

Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects *(AGRO)

P

D

Vector-Borne Diseases: Role of Chemistry in Managing Risks to Humans, Domestic Animals, Aquaculture & Wildlife

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends *(AGRO)

P

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development : New Trends & Best Practices **

P

P

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research *(AGRO)

A

P

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis *(AGRO)

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines to Fulfill Regulatory Needs **

P

Sci-Mix

E

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer *(AGRO)

P

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations *(AGRO)

P

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Challenges of Utilizing Higher-Tier Ecotoxicity Data in Risk Assessment & Risk Management of Pesticides *(AGRO)

A

P

P

A

P

P

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

53

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Agricultural & Food Chemistry (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Agrochemicals (continued)

Division of Agrochemicals (continued)

AGR O

AG RO

J. Eble, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) BioAccessibility & Potential Risks **

A

Agricultural-Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides **

D D

P

J. Eble, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency *(ENVR)

M Tu W Th

D A

E

D

P

E

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of George P. Lahm **

D D

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management *(AGRO)

Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects **

D

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation *(ENVR)

D

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends **

P

Functional Foods *(AGFD)

D

Analytical Methods & Study Designs in Pollinator Studies

P

Chemistry of Struvite & Slow-Release Fertilizers: From Fundamentals of Crystal Growth to Engineered Nutrient Recovery & Their Release *(ENVR)

P

E

P

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research **

A

E

D D A

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment **

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas *(AGFD)

A

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome *(AGFD)

E

D

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions **

D

Protection of Sustainable Agricultural Productivity, Public Health & the Environment: General Session

P

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines **

P

Good Laboratory Practices for the Agrochemical Professional

P

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis **

P

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer **

P

Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment **

P

Strategies for Radiolabeling Agrochemicals in Regulatory Studies & Advanced Techniques for Characterization **

P

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations ** NNB

P

Designing Better Studies: Issues & Improvements in Pollinator Studies

P

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Challenges of Utilizing Higher-Tier Ecotoxicity Data in Risk Assessment & Risk Management of Pesticides **

A

Contract Research, Good Laboratory Practices & Other Challenges for the Agrochemical Professional

A

Legal Aspects of Agriculture, Agrochemicals & Agribusiness **

A

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production **

A

54

Applied Nanotechnology for Food & Agriculture *(AGFD)

A

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies *(ENVR)

D

Get Published: Panel Discussion with JAFC Editors *(AGFD)

P

E

Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship *(AGFD)

A

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems *(ENVR)

D

Food Bioactives, Nanotechnology & Other Delivery Systems *(AGFD)

P

AGFD Award Symposium in Honor of Dr. Sevim Erhan *(AGFD)

P

E

Drug Discovery: Cheminformatic Approaches *(CINF)

P

Advances in Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs: Impact on the Future of the Food & Drug & Agrochemical Industry *(BMGT)

P

Environmental Obesogens: Exposure Pathways, Mechanism of Action & Trends *(ENVR)

PE

A

ANY L

Division of Analytical Chemistry

L. Baker, M. Bush, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Analytical Technology & Application Innovations in Pharma

A

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging ** NNB

D D A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier ** NNB

D D

Division of Analytical Chemistry (continued)

ANYL

L. Baker, M. Bush, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Nanoelectroanalytical Chemistry for Biological & Material Sciences NNB

D

Paper Devices for Bioanalysis

D

Student-Organized Symposia: Supramolecular Analytical Chemistry **

D

M Tu W Th

ANY L

L. Baker, M. Bush, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Advances in Spectroscopy NNB

NNB

M Tu W Th D

Student-Organized Symposia: Enabling Spectroscopies for Nanomaterial Applications: Energy Conversion to Therapeutics ** NNB

D

New Synthetic Tools & Analytical Methods for the Near-IR **

D P

Student-Organized Symposia: Preparative Mass Spectrometry: Recent Advances & Applications **

P

Methodologies for Use in Cleaning Validations

Analytical Division Poster Session NNB

E

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring *(ENVR)

D A

E

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in Honor of Prof. Guibin Jiang *(ENVR)

D D

E

Wearable & Implantable Sensors

D D A

Analysis of Materials for Energy Storage ** NNB

D

Chemical Forensics

D

Environmental Nanometrology *(ENVR)

D

Nanozymes for Bioanalysis NNB

D

Structures & Functions of Glycans *(CARB)

P

Sci-Mix

E

P

D

Recent Advances in Solid Phase Extraction: Symposium in Honor of Patrick D. McDonald

A

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Organic Contaminants in the Great Lakes, Seas & Oceans *(ENVR)

Nucleic Acid-Based Sensors NNB

D A

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation *(AGRO)

A

Light-Nanomaterial Interactions for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Sensing & Imaging & Materials Chemistry NNB

D

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies *(AGRO)

A

D

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles *(AGRO)

D

P

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies *(ENVR)

D

E

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development : New Trends & Best Practices *(AGRO)

P

P

Microplastic Pollution: Sources, Sinks & Solutions *(ENVR)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Structure & Function of 2D Materials ** NNB

Frontiers of Bioanalytical Raman Imaging & Spectroscopy

P

Analytical Division Awards

P

A

Solid-Phase Chemoenzymatic Methods for Analysis of Sialylated Glycans & their Intact Glycopeptides **

A

Student-Organized Symposia: New Paradigms in Nanoscale Electrocatalysis ** NNB

A

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes ** NNB

D

Advances in Electrochemistry

P

Joint Symposium of the Separation Science Subdivisions

P

Next-Generation Instrumentations & Measurement in Space Exploration **

P

Student-Organized Symposia: New Mass Spectrometry Methods for Polymer Analysis ** NNB

P

Student-Organized Symposia: Probing Biological Systems with Nonlinear Optics **

P

A

Opportunities in Forensic Proteomics: Applications, Bioinformatics, Admissibility, Quality Standards

A

Advances in Mass Spectrometry

D

P

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) BioAccessibility & Potential Risks *(AGRO)

A

P

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems *(ENVR)

D

E

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis *(COMSCI)

D

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends *(AGRO)

P

P

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

55

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Analytical Chemistry (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Analytical Chemistry (continued)

Division of Biological Chemistry (continued)

ANYL

L. Baker, M. Bush, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

B IO L

S. Kelley, P. Bevilacqua, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S A

M Tu W Th

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research *(AGRO)

A

Chemistry in Space: Past, Present & Future *(YCC)

A

Use of Computer Simulation to Teach Chemical Kinetics & Enzyme Kinetics in Undergraduate Research & Education *(CHED)

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions *(AGRO)

D

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring *(ENVR)

D A

From Lab to Tap: Implications of Scaling Up Nano-Enabled Environmental Technologies *(ENVR)

D

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier *(ANYL)

D D

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation *(ENFL)

P

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis *(AGRO)

P

Wastewater-Based Epidemiology: Opportunities & Challenges *(ENVR)

PE A

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production *(AGRO)

A

A

B I OT

Division of Biochemical Technology

N. Tugcu, M. Antoniewicz, Program Chairs Located with Primary Sponsor

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

S M P

Tu

W Th

BIOL

Division of Biological Chemistry S

Early Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry

A

Repligen Award for the Chemistry of Biological Processes

A

Debunking Myths of the Undruggable & Indistinguishable

P

Chemical Approaches to Interrogate Cell Biology

P

Gordon Hammes Award Lecture

P

Current Topics

E

M Tu W Th

P

Precision Genome Engineering

P

Sci-Mix

E

D

Chemical Immunomodulation

A

Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry

A

ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigators Award Symposium

P

Frontiers in Organofluorine Research for Biological Chemistry & Drug Discovery

56

D

Environmental Biofilm Engineering: Harnessing the Power of Biofilms for Contaminant Removal & Resource Recovery *(ENVR)

P

Tetrahedron Prize *(ORGN)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Projects of NCI Chemical Biology Consortium: A Unique, Collaborative Approach to Cancer Drug Discovery *(MEDI)

A

E

A

Physicochemical & Biological Phenomena on Sorbent Surfaces in Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

DE A A

Division of Business Development & Management

B MGT

Aloft Boston Seaport

S

Chemical Angel Network: Chemists Investing in Chemical Companies **

P

M Tu W Th

Advances in Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs: Impact on the Future of the Food & Drug & Agrochemical Industry **

E A

D

A. DeMasi, Program Chair

A

Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Fellow Symposium

Mid-Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry

E

A

Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry

Synthetic Chemical Biology

P

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome *(AGFD)

CRISPR *(AGFD)

S. Kelley, P. Bevilacqua, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Structures & Functions of Glycans *(CARB)

E

P

Artificial Intelligence & its Impact on the Chemical Enterprise *(YCC)

A

Francis P. Garvan–John M. Olin Medal Symposium in Honor of Valerie Kuck *(WCC)

P

Financial & Business Formation Strategies for Start-Ups & Chemical-Related Businesses *(SCHB)

A

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry

CARB S. Sucheck, Program Chair

P D P

Aloft Boston Seaport

S

Excellence in Undergraduate Research in Glycoscience **

A

Structures & Functions of Glycans **

P

General Posters **

E

Sci-Mix

M Tu W Th

D E

Division of Catalysis Science & Technology (continued)

C ARB

F. Tao, K. Ramasamy, Program Chairs

S. Sucheck, Program Chair

S

Aloft Boston Seaport

M Tu W Th

CAT L S

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel

M Tu W Th

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health **

D A

Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems

Enzymes in Glycoscience **

D

Hybrid Biological & Chemocatalytic Processes for Biomass Upgrading

D

Operando Spectroscopy for Catalysis

P

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis **

D

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research *(CELL)

D

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome *(AGFD)

E

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications *(ENVR)

D

Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials *(CELL)

D D

Tetrahedron Prize *(ORGN)

P

Solid-Phase Chemoenzymatic Methods for Analysis of Sialylated Glycans & their Intact Glycopeptides *(ANYL)

A

Functional Materials from Biopolymer SelfAssembly & Self-Organization *(CELL)

D A

Division of Catalysis Science & Technology

F. Tao, K. Ramasamy, Program Chairs

S

M Tu W Th

Catalytic Insights from In Situ/Operando X-Ray & Neutron Techniques

D A

P

D D

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

P

D

W. Thielemans, Program Chair Aloft Boston Seaport

S

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research **

D

General Posters

E D

Sci-Mix

E

D A

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level

D D D A

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications *(ENVR)

A

Catalysis for Transformation of Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen to Chemical & Fuel Feedstock

D D

Excellence in Undergraduate Research in Glycoscience *(CARB)

A

Application of Electron Microscopy to Catalysis Studies

Structures & Functions of Glycans *(CARB)

P

D

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome *(AGFD)

Understanding Catalytic Sites on Amorphous & Disordered Materials

D

E E

General Posters *(CARB) Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

2018 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science: Symposium in Honor of Nicholas Turner

D

Heterogeneous Catalyst Development for Biomass Upgrading

P

General Catalysis

P DE

Sci-Mix

E

D D

Catalytic Activation & Chemical Transformation of Light Alkanes

A

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach

D D A

New Vistas in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Symposium in Honor of Robert Grasselli

D

Advanced Catalytic Materials with WellDefined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability

P

D D

M Tu W Th

Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials ** NNB Functional Materials from Biopolymer SelfAssembly & Self-Organization ** NNB

D

E

CE LL

Role of Water & Solvent in Heterogeneous Catalysis

Application of Ambient Pressure XPS to Catalysis Studies

A

AE

Novel Catalytic Materials *(ENFL)

Division of Cellulose & Renewable Materials

C AT L

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel

A

D A

D D A AE

D D

D

E

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health *(CARB)

D

A

Enzymes in Glycoscience *(CARB)

D

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis *(CARB)

P

D

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

57

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

C H ED

Division of Chemical Education

CH AS

Division of Chemical Health & Safety

A. Marsh, D. Bromfield-Lee, P. Daubenmire, Program Chairs Seaport World Trade Center

S

M Tu W Th

D. Decker, J. Pickel, Program Chairs Seaport Boston Hotel

S P

M Tu W Th

Use of Computer Simulation to Teach Chemical Kinetics & Enzyme Kinetics in Undergraduate Research & Education **

A

Ask Dr. Safety: Safety Considerations in the Cannabis Industry **

Chemistry Teachers Day Program **

D

Informal STEM Education: Innovation & Collaboration ** NNB

D

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production ** NNB

A

CHAS Awards Symposium **

P

Nanomaterials: Applications, Safety Considerations, & Implications for Human Health & the Environment ** NNB

P E

Undergraduate Research Papers ** General Posters

P E

General Papers

A

A

Science Diplomacy & Chemistry Education **

D

Sci-Mix

Approaches in Using Food & Cooking to Engage Diverse Audiences in Science

D

Learning Laboratory Safety through Storytelling **

From Nano to Macro: How to Let Students Discover the Applications of Materials NNB

P

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward *(PRES)

D

Undergraduate Research Posters ** NNB

P

P

Successful Student Chapters **

E

Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments *(AGRO)

Sci-Mix

E

Citizens First! Using Real-World Contexts for Engaging Students in Learning Chemistry **

D

GSSPC: Frontiers in Computational Chemistry: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Experiment **

D

Celebrating the Success of an Exchange Program for German & American Chemistry Students **

P

A

A

D

Reducing Uncertainty in Modeling the Environmental & Human Health Exposure to Agrochemicals *(AGRO)

A

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer *(AGRO)

P CINF

Division of Chemical Information

R. Bienstock, Program Chair Westin Boston Waterfront

S

Facilitating Student Success in General Chemistry I Laboratory

A

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information **

D

Green Chemistry Theory & Practice: Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond ** NNB

D

Chemoinformatic Approaches to Enhance Drug Discovery Based on Natural Products

D

Alternate Assessment Methods

P

Reporting & Reproducibility of Chemistry Research Data **

D

Research in Chemistry Education

P

CINF Poster Session

E

Women of Color in the Academy: Empirical Studies & Models of Success *(PROF)

A

A

Publishing Chemical Data **

D P E

A

How to Get Your 1st Industrial Job *(PROF)

A

Where are the Standards: Biologics Registration & HELM

TRiO & Chemistry *(PROF)

P

Sci-Mix

D

Chemistry Librarians of the Future *(CINF)

D

Henkel Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy *(PMSE)

58

A

M Tu W Th

Ethics of Data Sharing **

Citizen Science & Chemistry *(ENVR)

Broadening Participation in STEM: Empirical Studies & Models of Success *(PROF)

D

Chemistry Librarians of the Future **

D

Skolnik Symposium: De Novo Design

D

Machine Learning Scoring Functions

A

Move Away from the Lamppost & Find Druggable Targets

A

Semantics in Chemistry Vocabulary & Terminology

A

Drug Discovery: Cheminformatic Approaches

P

A

Reaction Analytics

P

A

C I NF

Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistrys

R. Nagarajan, Program Chair

R. Bienstock, Program Chair

S

Westin Boston Waterfront

M Tu W Th

The More the Merrier: Combine Drugs Together

P TOX I

Division of Chemical Toxicology

T. Spratt, Program Chair

Translesion DNA Polymerases NNB

S A

Founders’ Award **

P

Westin Boston Waterfront

M Tu W Th

A

Student/Post-Doc Chemical Toxicology of Nanomaterials

P

Sci-Mix

E

CO LL

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials NNB

A

P

Particle Sizing of Nanoparticles: From Regulatory & Metrology Aspects to Application & Analysis NNB

A

Heating with Colloidal Nanoparticles: Physical Mechanisms & Applications in Life Science NNB

D A

Colloidal & Interfacial Science in Separation Processes NNB

D D

Understanding Nano-Bio Interactions: Implications for Bio-Imaging, Diagnosis & Treatment NNB

D D

D

A D A

Mechanisms of Binding, Transport & Biotransformation of Toxic Metals **

A

Chemical Research in Toxicology Young Investigator Award

P

Advances in Colloid & Surface Chemistry Enabled by Cryogenic & In Situ Liquid-Cell Electron Microscopy NNB

Keynote Lectures

P

Nanomaterials NNB

DE D A D A

Posters

E

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications NNB

DE D A D A

A

Surface Chemistry NNB

DE

P

Frontiers & Challenges in NanoparticleMediated Chemical Transformations NNB

P

D A D A

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues NNB

P

D A D A

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces NNB

E

D A D

Colloid & Surface Chemistry in Industry: Applications & Career Opportunities **

E

D

Fundamental Research in Colloids, Surfaces & Nanomaterials NNB

E

Nanomaterials in Drug Delivery: Efficacy & Toxicity Considerations ** NNB Topics in Chemical Toxicology NNB Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments *(AGRO)

P CHAL

Division of Chemistry & the Law

K. Bianco, K. McIntyre, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Strengthening Your Patent Rights in Light of Recent Federal Circuit Court Decisions

P

M Tu W Th

Developments in Pharmaceutical Patent Law **

A

Extensions to Patent Term in the U.S. & Worldwide

P

Sci-Mix

E

Sci-Mix

D A

E

Toward Atomic Precision in Controlling the Low Dimensional Materials NNB

A D A P

Recent Developments in the Protection of Nanotechnology-Related Intellectual Property **

A

Langmuir Lectures, NanoLetters Award Lecture, ACS Materials & Interfaces Award Lecture ** NNB

Protecting Your Ideas in the Chemical Arts

P

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging *(ANYL)

D D A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier *(ANYL)

D D

Non-Traditional Careers in Chemistry **

A

The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law

P

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information *(CINF)

D

Intellectual Property Basics for Chemical Businesses *(SCHB)

P

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer *(AGRO)

P

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

59

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Chemical Information (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry (continued)

Division of Computers in Chemistry (continued)

CO LL R. Nagarajan, Program Chair

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Interfacial Chemistry under Nanoscale Confinement *(GEOC)

D

M Tu W Th

CO M P

H. Woodco*ck, J. Shen, M. Feig, Program Chairs Westin Boston Waterfront

S

M Tu W Th

Wiley Computers in Chemistry Outstanding Postdoc Award **

E

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials *(PMSE)

D D D A

A

Molecular Understanding of the Structure & Reactivity of Mineral-Water Interfaces *(GEOC)

Molecular Mechanics: Computational Studies of Membranes & Transmembrane Channels & Transporters

D

Quantum Mechanics NNB

D A

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Molecular Mechanics

P

Structure & Function of 2D Materials *(ANYL)

D

Functional Materials from Biopolymer SelfAssembly & Self-Organization *(CELL)

D A

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes *(ANYL)

D

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation *(ENFL)

P

Division of Computers in Chemistry

CO M P

A

H. Woodco*ck, J. Shen, M. Feig, Program Chairs Westin Boston Waterfront

Computational Studies of Water Membrane Protein Simulations & Free Energy Approaches

S A

M Tu W Th

D D

Emerging Technologies in Computational Chemistry

D

P

Computational Photocatalysis: Modeling of Photophysics & Photochemistry at Interfaces NNB

D D D D

Revolutionizing Chemistry with Artificial Intelligence NNB

D D D

Data to Decisions: Frank Brown Memorial Symposium

D

Sci-Mix

E

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

A D D

GSSPC: Frontiers in Computational Chemistry: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Experiment *(CHED)

D

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis *(COMSCI)

D

Computational Methods for Lanthanides & Actinides: Theory & Applications *(NUCL)

E

P

E NFL

Renaissance Boston Waterfront

S

Petroleum, Natural Gas, Gas Hydrates & Shale Gas

M Tu W Th

D A

USA-China Symposium on Energy NNB

D D D

Battery Technology: Vehicle to Grid NNB

D D

2D Materials: Innovative Materials & Devices for Energy & Fuels NNB

D D

Carbon Dioxide Conversion & Artificial Photosynthesis NNB

D

Innovative Nanomaterials Used in Solar Energy NNB

D

Innovative Materials & Integrated Pathways for Sustainable Energy & Resource Production NNB

D

Nanoscience of Energy Storage NNB

D A D

Innovative Chemistry, Materials & Characterizations for Electrochemical Energy Storage NNB

D D D A

Sustainable Energy Conversion via Innovative Electrocatalysis & Photocatalysis

D D D

E

Energy & Fuels Storch Award in Fuel Science: Symposium in Honor of Andrew Herring ** NNB

D D

E

Novel Catalytic Materials NNB

P

Advancing RNA Designs

A

Drug Design

P

Chemical Computing Group Graduate Student Travel Awards

E

NVIDIA GPU Award

E

OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award Poster Session

60

Materials in Extreme Environments *(PHYS)

J. Liu, Program Chair

Recent Advances in DFT & TDDFT: Theory & D D D Simulations NNB COMP Meets CRYO: New Frontiers in Flexible Fitting, Image Processing & Refinement of Cryo-EM Data NNB

D

A

Division of Energy & Fuels

D D D

Material Science NNB

Use of Computer Simulation to Teach Chemical Kinetics & Enzyme Kinetics in Undergraduate Research & Education *(CHED)

D D

D D

Division of Environmental Chemistry (continued)

E NFL J. Liu, Program Chair

S

Renaissance Boston Waterfront

Nanomaterials Used in Energy & Fuels

M Tu W Th

E

Sci-Mix Nanomaterials & Nanotechnology in the Oil & Gas Industry NNB

D A

Biomass to Energy, Chemicals & Functional Materials NNB

D D

2018 Energy & Fuels Joint Award for Excellence in Publication: Symposium in Honor of Fateme Rezaei ** NNB

P

Sustainable Bioenergy Production

A

International Symposium on Mesoporous Zeolites

D

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation ** NNB

P

A

Perovskite Solar Cell & Water Splitting for Efficient Hydrogen Generation NNB

P

A

Nanoscaled Electrocatalysts Used in Fuel Cells & Hybrid Vehicles NNB

A

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications *(ENVR)

A

AE

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency *(ENVR)

D A

E

Designing Polymers for Function in Electrochemical Energy Storage Devices *(PMSE)

D D

Analysis of Materials for Energy Storage *(ANYL)

D

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

P

Advanced Materials for Energy & the Environment: Design, Fabrication & Application *(ENVR)

D

E

D DE D

Electrical/Electrochemical Technologies for Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

DE D E NVR

Division of Environmental Chemistry

J. Goldfarb, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Per- & Polyfluoroalkyl Substances: D A Identification, Fate, Transport, Exposure & Removal **

P

NNB

E NVR

J. Goldfarb, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications ** NNB

A

AE

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring **

D A

E

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency **

D A

E

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in Honor of Prof. Guibin Jiang **

D D

E

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation **

D

E

Environmental Nanometrology ** NNB

D

Chemistry of Struvite & Slow-Release Fertilizers: From Fundamentals of Crystal Growth to Engineered Nutrient Recovery & Their Release **

P

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Organic Contaminants in the Great Lakes, Seas & Oceans **

P

E

Emerging Challenges in the Era of Drinking Water Insecurity & Inequality & the Search for Low-Cost Solutions **

A

Citizen Science & Chemistry **

A

Advances in Carbon Nanomaterial Design & Applications for Environmental Sustainability NNB

D

E

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies **

D

E

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science **

D

Environmental Biofilm Engineering: Harnessing the Power of Biofilms for Contaminant Removal & Resource Recovery **

P

A

Chemical Reactions at Solid-Water Interfaces of the Natural & Built Environment **

P

D DE A

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications **

P

D

Microplastic Pollution: Sources, Sinks & Solutions **

P

Showcasing Emerging Investigators: A Symposium by the RSC Environmental Science Journals ** NNB

P

E

E

E

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

61

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Energy & Fuels (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Environmental Chemistry (continued)

Division of Environmental Chemistry (continued)

E NVR

J. Goldfarb, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Sci-Mix

M Tu W Th E

E NVR

J. Goldfarb, Program Chair Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

Reducing Uncertainty in Modeling the Environmental & Human Health Exposure to Agrochemicals *(AGRO)

A

Green Chemistry & the Environment **

D AE

Advanced Oxidation for Water Treatment: Applications & Implications

D DE A

D

Advanced Materials for Energy & the Environment: Design, Fabrication & Application ** NNB

Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials *(CELL)

D DE D

D

Fate of Nanomaterials in Consumer Products: Transformation & Transportation in the Environment NNB

Molecular Understanding of the Structure & Reactivity of Mineral-Water Interfaces *(GEOC)

D

E

P

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems **

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices *(AGRO)

D

E

C. Ellen Gonter Environmental Graduate Student Award Symposium **

P

P

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines to Fulfill Regulatory Needs *(AGRO) Showcasing Emerging Investigators: A Symposium by the RSC Environmental Science Journals *(ENVR)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

From Lab to Tap: Implications of Scaling Up Nano-Enabled Environmental Technologies ** NNB

D

Physicochemical & Biological Phenomena on Sorbent Surfaces in Environmental Applications **

DE A

Electrical/Electrochemical Technologies for Environmental Applications **

DE D

Wastewater-Based Epidemiology: Opportunities & Challenges **

D

P

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) BioAccessibility & Potential Risks *(AGRO)

A

P

D

D

PE A

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of George P. Lahm *(AGRO)

Environmental Obesogens: Exposure Pathways, Mechanism of Action & Trends **

PE

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment *(AGRO)

A

Nanobubbles: A Sustainable Solution for Water Treatment & Agricultural Applications NNB

E

Visualizing Heavy Element Contamination in the Environment at the Nanoscale *(GEOC)

A

Division of Environmental Chemistry General Poster Session

E

Functional Materials from Biopolymer SelfAssembly & Self-Organization *(CELL)

D A

Legacy & Emerging Organic Contaminants in the Great Lakes, Seas & Oceans

E

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions *(AGRO)

D

Legacy & Emerging Per- & Polyfluoroalkyl Substances: Identification, Fate, Transport, Exposure & Removal

P

E

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines *(AGRO) New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis *(AGRO)

P

D

How Can Advances in Chemistry Improve Human Health Exposure Assessment? *(AGRO)

A

P

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research *(CELL)

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer *(AGRO)

D

P

Microbial Chemical Processes & Advanced Nanotechnology for Contaminated Site Remediation *(GEOC)

Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment *(AGRO)

E

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations *(AGRO)

P

P

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation *(AGRO)

A

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies *(AGRO)

A

62

P

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Challenges of Utilizing Higher-Tier Ecotoxicity Data in Risk Assessment & Risk Management of Pesticides *(AGRO)

A

N. Kabengi, Program Chair

S

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

M Tu W Th

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry (continued)

I&E C

C. Abney, R. Mayes, Program Chairs

S

Seaport Boston Hotel

M Tu W Th E

Interfacial Chemistry under Nanoscale Confinement **

D

General Posters

General Geochemistry

PE

Microbial Chemical Processes & Advanced Nanotechnology for Contaminated Site Remediation **

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications *(ENVR)

A

AE

E

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency *(ENVR)

D A

E

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation *(ENVR)

D

E

Molecular Understanding of the Structure & Reactivity of Mineral-Water Interfaces **

P D

Mechanistic Understanding of Mineral Growth & Dissolution

D

Visualizing Heavy Element Contamination in the Environment at the Nanoscale **

A

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in Honor of Prof. Guibin Jiang *(ENVR)

D D

Environmental Nanometrology *(ENVR)

D

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Organic Contaminants in the Great Lakes, Seas & Oceans *(ENVR)

P

Chemical Reactions at Solid-Water Interfaces of the Natural & Built Environment *(ENVR)

E

D DE A D

E

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems *(ENVR)

P

D

E

Division of the History of Chemistry

H IST

N. Tsarevsky, Program Chair

S A

Seaport Boston Hotel

Tutorial & General Papers Past ACS Presidents: The Life & Career of Arthur Cope

M Tu W Th

P

Louis Pasteur’s Discovery of Molecular Chirality: Review & Analysis on the 170th Anniversary

D

Sci-Mix

E

HIST Award Symposium Honoring David Lewis **

D P

Polymer History *(POLY)

Division of Industrial & Engineering Chemistry

I&E C

C. Abney, R. Mayes, Program Chairs Seaport Boston Hotel

S

Industrial Research of Chemists Local to the New England Region **

P D

Sci-Mix

E

General Papers ** NNB

Nanomaterials: Applications, Safety Considerations & Implications for Human Health & the Environment *(CHAS)

P

D

E

D D

INO R

Division of Inorganic Chemistry

N. Radu, S. Koch, Program Chairs Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

Undergraduate Chemistry Majors Inorganic Symposium

M Tu W Th

A

Inorganic Catalysts

AE A

Bioinorganic Chemistry

AE

Recent Advances in Red & Black Phosphorus Chemistry

D A

Coordination Chemistry

D A

P DE

E DE

Chemistry of Materials

D D D DE

Organometallic Chemistry

DE P AE DE

Electrochemistry

P

Inorganic Young Investigator Awards

P

E

Organometallics Distinguished Author Symposium

P

Recent Advances in the Photochemistry & Photophysics of the P-Block Elements

E

Lanthanide & Actinide Chemistry

E

P

Solid-State Inorganic Chemistry

E

P

Main Group Chemistry

E

P

D

P

M Tu W Th

Chemistry of Molten Salts ** I&EC Graduate Student Awards Symposium **

P

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of George P. Lahm *(AGRO)

P

Environmental Radiochemistry *(NUCL)

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications *(ENVR)

D A

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

63

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

GE OC

Division of Geochemistry

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Inorganic Chemistry (continued)

INO R

Division of Medicinal Chemistry (continued)

ME D I A. Stamford, Program Chair

N. Radu, S. Koch, Program Chairs

S

M Tu W Th

M Tu W Th

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Inorganic Chemistry Lectureship: Symposium in Honor of Leroy Cronin

A

A

The Halpern Legacy: Mechanism, Catalysis & Organotransition Metal Chemistry

Projects of NCI Chemical Biology Consortium: A Unique, Collaborative Approach to Cancer Drug Discovery **

D D

P

Women in Nanotechnology **

D

Structure-Based Drug Design for GPCRs & Other Difficult Targets

Water Splitting & Solar Fuels: Progress & Challenges to Widespread Utilization

P

Pathways for Industrial Chemists Symposium

P

Sci-Mix

E

S

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

D

Inorganic Spectroscopy

A

Inorganic Nanoscience Award Symposium

A

Nanoscience

E

A

Environmental & Energy-Related Inorganic Chemistry

E

D

Chemical Applications of Ultrafast X-Ray/ XUV Spectroscopy & Scattering *(PHYS)

D D A D A

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy *(MPPG)

D D

Chemistry of Materials Lectureship & Best Paper Award *(PMSE)

A

Innovation & Commercialization in the Chemical Sector *(SCHB)

A

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Mechanisms of Binding, Transport & Biotransformation of Toxic Metals *(TOXI)

E

S A

Small-Molecule Approaches to the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

A

Awards Session **

P

Emerging Trends in Target Identification

P

General Poster Session

E

Best Practices in Fragment-Based Drug Design

M Tu W Th A P P

E

New Advances in Treating Rare Diseases

A

Biology’s Magic Methyl: Methyltransferases & Demethylases as Epigenetic & Neurotransmitter Regulators

P

D

Structures & Functions of Glycans *(CARB)

P

D

Tetrahedron Prize *(ORGN)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis *(COMSCI)

D A NU C L

Seaport Boston Hotel

S

Honor Symposium for Dr. Leonard Mausner **

A

New Radioisotope Chemistry for Nuclear Medicine

P

M Tu W Th

Nuclear Forensics

A

Environmental Radiochemistry **

P

D

E

General Topics in Radiochemistry

A

Radiochemistry Education

P

A

Computational Methods for Lanthanides & Actinides: Theory & Applications **

E

P

D

Visualizing Heavy Element Contamination in the Environment at the Nanoscale *(GEOC)

A O RG N

Division of Organic Chemistry

R. Broene, S. Silverman, Program Chairs

New Reactions & Methodology

S M Tu W Th D D D E

Heterocycles & Aromatics

D D

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Confronting the Opioid Epidemic: Novel Treatments for Chronic Pain

P

Young Investigator Symposium

Drug Discovery for the Treatment of Childhood Neuromuscular Diseases

P

Green Chemistry Innovations as a Useful Tool in the Pharmaceutical Industry

D

Sci-Mix

E

Photoredox Chemistry

DE

64

D

Bioactives & Skin Health *(AGFD)

Chemistry of Molten Salts *(I&EC)

A

A

D

Bioactives & Neurodegenerative Diseases *(AGFD)

J. Auxier, Program Chair

A. Stamford, Program Chair

General Oral Session

First-Time Disclosure of Clinical Candidates

Division of Nuclear Chemistry & Technology

ME DI

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

A

Nanomaterials in Drug Delivery: Efficacy & Toxicity Considerations *(TOXI)

A

Division of Medicinal Chemistry

Antibiotic Resistance: Recent Advances in Drug Discovery & Development

E

Division of Organic Chemistry (continued)

O R GN

R. Broene, S. Silverman, Program Chairs

M Tu W Th

JOC-OL Lectureship

S P

Asymmetric Reactions & Syntheses

E

D A

Peptides, Proteins & Amino Acids

E

D

Metal-Mediated Reactions & Syntheses

E

P

CH Activation

E

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

Organometallics Distinguished Author Award

O RG N

R. Broene, S. Silverman, Program Chairs

S

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

M Tu W Th

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations *(AGRO)

P

New Synthetic Tools & Analytical Methods for the Near-IR *(ANYL)

A

D PH YS

Division of Physical Chemistry

D

M. Duncan, Program Chair

A

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S M Tu W Th D D A A

M-CHEM: A Whole Lot of Shaking Going On **

A

Biologically Related Molecules & Processes

D

E

Characterization, Detection & Application of Excitons in Chemistry NNB

D D A D A

Physical Organic Chemistry: Calculations, Mechanisms, Photochemistry & HighEnergy Species

D

E

Chemical Applications of Ultrafast X-Ray/ XUV Spectroscopy & Scattering ** NNB

D D A D A

Role of Organic Chemistry in Early Clinical Drug Development

Electrochemical Interfaces NNB

D D A D A

D

Flow Chemistry & Continuous Processes

P

Tetrahedron Prize **

P

Sci-Mix

E

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

Strong Field Chemistry

Ultrafast Molecular Sciences by Femtosecond Photons & Electrons: D D A D A Symposium in Honor of Ahmed Zewail NNB

E

AE

NNB

Cope Award Symposium

D

Young Academic Investigator Symposium

D

Molecular Recognition & Self-Assembly

E

Chemistry of Fullerenes, Carbon Nanotubes & Graphene

E

Materials, Devices & Switches

E

P

A

Technical Achievements in Organic Chemistry **

D

Diminutive Molecules, Big Impact: The Chemistry of ADC Linker-Payloads

D

Total Synthesis of Complex Molecules

DE A

Carbon Allotrophes, Materials, Devices & Switches

P

Reporting & Reproducibility of Chemistry Research Data *(CINF)

D

Structures & Functions of Glycans *(CARB)

P

A

Publishing Chemical Data *(CINF)

D

Information Theory & Dynamics: From Elementary Processes to Systems Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of Raphael Levine NNB

D D

New Spectroscopic Techniques for Astrochemistry

P

D D

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis *(COMSCI)

D

P

D A D D

Materials in Extreme Environments ** NNB

P

Sci-Mix

E

A D D

Structural Photonics: Determining the Structural Influence on the Physical Properties of Photonic Materials NNB

A D D

PHYS Awards Symposium ** NNB

P E

PHYS Poster Session Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging *(ANYL)

D D A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier *(ANYL)

D D

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes *(ANYL)

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in Honor of George P. Lahm *(AGRO)

Strategies for Radiolabeling Agrochemicals in Regulatory Studies & Advanced Techniques for Characterization *(AGRO)

D D A D D

Structure & Function of 2D Materials *(ANYL)

D

M-CHEM: A Whole Lot of Shaking Going On *(ORGN)

A

From Potential Energy Surfaces to Dynamics & Kinetics NNB

D D

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

65

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Organic Chemistry (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

P O LY

Division of Polymer Chemistry

C. Lipscomb, T. Epps, B. Helms, Program Chairs Westin Boston Waterfront

S

M Tu W Th

General Topics: New Synthesis & Characterization of Polymers

D A

Vitrimers & Other Covalent Adaptable Networks

D D AE

E

D A

Polymer Chemistry for Functional Materials D D DE TOSOH Lectures **

D D DE

Polymer Science of Everyday Things

D

Polymers in Cultural Heritage

D

Division of Polymeric Materials Science & Engineering

PMS E

E. Harth, B. Olsen, C. Snyder, X. Jia, A. Norman, Program Chairs Westin Boston Waterfront

S

Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science **

M Tu W Th

A

Porous Polymers ** NNB

D D D D

Designing Polymers for Function in Electrochemical Energy Storage Devices ** NNB

D D

Dynamic Bonds for Structurally Precise Polymeric Materials NNB

D D

Industrial Polymer Scientist Award Symposium in Honor of Qinghuang Lin

A

D D

Ionic Liquids in Polymer Science & Engineering: From Molecular Design to Energy & Beyond

Probing Structure & Morphology of Polymers & Polymer Composites in Real & Reciprocal Space NNB

D DE A

Tough & Toughened Polymers NNB

D D

Block Polymer Synthesis & Nanoscale SelfAssembly NNB

PMSE Young Investigators’ Symposium

D D

P DE D A

D

Industrial Innovations in Polymer Science

P

General Papers & New Concepts in Polymeric Materials Stereochemical Enhancement of Materials Properties

D

Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award: Symposium in Honor of Rachel O’Reilly **

P

Polymers for Defense Applications

DE D A

Materials Genome Approach to Structure & Function

PE D A

DSM Science & Technology Award

A

Biomacromolecules/Macromolecules Young Investigator Award

P

Polymer History **

P

POLY/PMSE Plenary & Awards Event **

E

Porous Polymers *(PMSE)

D D D D

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research *(CELL)

D

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials *(AGFD)

E

D A

Chemistry of Materials Lectureship & Best Paper Award ** Surface, Interface & Coating Materials ** NNB

A D A

A D D D A

PMSE Future Faculty Symposium

D D

Synthesis, Processing & Device Engineering of Polymeric Electronic Materials NNB

P

Sci-Mix

E

D D

Structure & Assembly of Food Biopolymers *(AGFD)

D A

Bioconjugate Chemistry Lectureship & Award: Symposium in Honor of Wolfgang Parak ** NNB

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials *(PMSE)

D D D A

Multifunctional Nanocomposites & Surface Damage Phenomena in Polymers NNB

D D

Rational Design of Multifunctional Renewable-Resourced Materials *(CELL)

D D

Roy W. Tess Award: Symposium in Honor of Christopher Bowman **

D

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Advances in Human Space Exploration: Second ACS NASA Symposium

D

Advances in Bioconjugate Materials for Biomedical Applications

P E

Joint PMSE-POLY Poster Session *(PMSE)

E

Henkel Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy *(PMSE)

A

Joint PMSE-POLY Poster Session **

Functional Materials from Biopolymer SelfAssembly & Self-Organization *(CELL)

D A

Henkel Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy **

A

A

Polymer Nanoscience & Nanotechnology

D

NNB

TOSOH Lectures *(POLY) Block Polymer Synthesis & Nanoscale SelfAssembly *(POLY)

66

D D DE P DE D A

P MSE

Division of Professional Relations (continued)

E. Harth, B. Olsen, C. Snyder, X. Jia, A. Norman, Program Chairs Westin Boston Waterfront

S

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

M Tu W Th P

Polymer History *(POLY)

P

POLY/PMSE Plenary & Awards Event *(POLY)

E PROF

Division of Professional Relations

R. Libby, Program Chair

M Tu W Th

PRO F R. Libby, Program Chair

Aloft Boston Seaport

Francis P. Garvan–John M. Olin Medal Symposium in Honor of Valerie Kuck *(WCC)

S

M Tu W Th P

Young Scientist/JAFC Best Paper Awards *(AGFD)

A

Bioconjugate Chemistry Lectureship & Award: Symposium in Honor of Wolfgang Parak *(PMSE)

A

Aloft Boston Seaport

S

Women of Color in the Academy: Empirical Studies & Models of Success **

A

A

Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in Honor of Barbara Belmont **

Financial & Business Formation Strategies for Start-Ups & Chemical-Related Businesses *(SCHB)

P

HIST Award Symposium Honoring David Lewis *(HIST)

D

Roy W. Tess Award: Symposium in Honor of Christopher Bowman *(PMSE)

D

I&EC Graduate Student Awards Symposium *(I&EC)

D

Mom the Chemistry Professor *(WCC)

D

C. Ellen Gonter Environmental Graduate Student Award Symposium *(ENVR)

P

AGFD Award Symposium in Honor of Dr. Sevim Erhan *(AGFD)

P

Langmuir Lectures, NanoLetters Award Lecture, ACS Materials & Interfaces Award Lecture *(COLL)

P

P

How to Get Your 1st Industrial Job **

A

TRiO & Chemistry **

P

Sci-Mix

E

Broadening Participation in STEM: Empirical Studies & Models of Success **

D

Exploring the “Nano”: Leveraging Unique Abilities

P

Honor Symposium for Dr. Leonard Mausner *(NUCL)

A

Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science *(PMSE)

A

Chemistry Teachers Day Program *(CHED)

D

2018 Energy & Fuels Joint Award for Excellence in Publication: Symposium in Honor of Fateme Rezaei *(ENFL)

Informal STEM Education: Innovation & Collaboration *(CHED)

D

PHYS Awards Symposium *(PHYS)

P

Awards Session *(MEDI)

P

Wiley Computers in Chemistry Outstanding Postdoc Award *(COMP)

E

Founders’ Award *(TOXI)

P

Intellectual Property Basics for Chemical Businesses *(SCHB)

P

Chemical Angel Network: Chemists Investing in Chemical Companies *(BMGT)

P

Colloid & Surface Chemistry in Industry: Applications & Career Opportunities *(COLL)

E

Entrepreneurs’ Poster Session *(SCHB)

E

Merck Research Award Symposium *(WCC) A

A

D

Developments in Pharmaceutical Patent Law *(CHAL)

A

Energy & Fuels Storch Award in Fuel Science: Symposium in Honor of Andrew Herring *(ENFL)

D D

Science Diplomacy & Chemistry Education *(CHED)

D

Showcasing Emerging Investigators: A Symposium by the RSC Environmental Science Journals *(ENVR)

P

Eminent Scientist Lecture & Luncheon with Dr. JoAnne Stubbe *(SOCED)

P

Henkel Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Chemistry: Symposium in Honor of Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy *(PMSE)

A

Non-Traditional Careers in Chemistry *(CHAL)

A

POLY/PMSE Plenary & Awards Event *(POLY)

E

Legal Aspects of Agriculture, Agrochemicals & Agribusiness *(AGRO)

A

*Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

67

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Polymeric Materials Science & Engineering (continued)

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

Division of Small Chemical Businesses

SCHB

Committee on Environmental Improvement (continued)

CE I

J. Sabol, Program Chair

S

Aloft Boston Seaport

Open House with Division of Small Chemical Businesses

A

Intellectual Property Basics for Chemical Businesses **

P

Entrepreneurs’ Poster Session **

E

M Tu W Th

In Memory of Arthur Obermayer, CoFounder of the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Grant Programs

P

Sci-Mix

E

Catalyzing Collaborations from Ideas to Commercial Development

P

C. Kuniyoshi, J.C. Schlatterer, N. DiFabio, Program Chairs

M Tu W Th

Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems *(CATL)

D A C EI

C. Middlecamp, Program Chair

S

M Tu W Th

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Per- & Polyfluoroalkyl Substances: D A Identification, Fate, Transport, Exposure & Removal *(ENVR) Citizen Science & Chemistry *(ENVR)

A

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies *(ENVR)

D

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science *(ENVR)

D

Microplastic Pollution: Sources, Sinks & Solutions *(ENVR)

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

S

Chemistry as a Second Language: Strategies for Global Scientific Communication *(YCC)

P

M Tu W Th

D P

Green Chemistry Theory & Practice: Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond *(CHED)

D CMA

Committee on Minority Affairs

J. Sarquis, R. Joseph, Program Chairs Located with Primary Sponsor

S

Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in Honor of Barbara Belmont *(PROF)

P

Emerging Challenges in the Era of Drinking Water Insecurity & Inequality & the Search for Low-Cost Solutions *(ENVR)

M Tu W Th

A

E

CO MSCI

Committee on Science

M. Fisher, Program Chair

E

Green Chemistry & the Environment *(ENVR)

D AE

Advanced Materials for Energy & the Environment: Design, Fabrication & Application *(ENVR)

D DE D

68

Located with Primary Sponsor

Celebrating the Success of an Exchange Program for German & American Chemistry Students *(CHED)

AE I

Committee on Environmental Improvement

IAC

Science Diplomacy & Chemistry Education *(CHED)

P

Academic Employment Initiative

D

J. Breffke, Program Chair

A

Located with Primary Sponsor

D

International Activities Committee

Financial & Business Formation Strategies for Start-Ups & Chemical-Related Businesses **

S

M Tu W Th

Green Chemistry Theory & Practice: Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond *(CHED)

A

Located with Primary Sponsor

S

Citizens First! Using Real-World Contexts for Engaging Students in Learning Chemistry *(CHED)

Innovation & Commercialization in the Chemical Sector **

Chemical Angel Network: Chemists Investing in Chemical Companies *(BMGT)

C. Middlecamp, Program Chair Located with Primary Sponsor

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center

S

M Tu W Th

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis **

D

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science *(ENVR)

D

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers *(PRES)

D

A. Keirstead, Program Chair

YCC

Younger Chemists Committee

D. Williams, M. Brann, K. Heroux, Program Chairs

M Tu W Th

Westin Boston Waterfront

S

P

Chemistry as a Second Language: Strategies for Global Scientific Communication **

P

Undergraduate Research Posters *(CHED)

P

Successful Student Chapters *(CHED)

E

Artificial Intelligence & its Impact on The Chemical Enterprise ** NNB

Seaport Boston Hotel

S

Eminent Scientist Lecture & Luncheon with Dr. JoAnne Stubbe ** Undergraduate Research Papers *(CHED)

P

C. Libby, Program Chair Located with Primary Sponsor

S

Industrial Research of Chemists Local to the New England Region *(I&EC)

P

M Tu W Th

A

How to Get Your 1st Industrial Job *(PROF) I&EC Graduate Student Awards Symposium *(I&EC)

D A

General Papers *(I&EC) Technical Achievements in Organic Chemistry *(ORGN)

D WCC

Women Chemists Committee

R. Cole, Program Chair Westin Boston Waterfront / Sheraton Boston Hotel

S

Merck Research Award Symposium **

A

Francis P. Garvan–John M. Olin Medal Symposium in Honor of Valerie Kuck **

M Tu W Th

P D

Mom the Chemistry Professor **

A

Best of Both Worlds: Green Chemistry in Academia & Industry

C TA

Committee on Technician Affairs

M Tu W Th

D

Chemistry in Space & Past, Present & Future ** NNB

A

Student-Organized Symposia: Supramolecular Analytical Chemistry *(ANYL)

D

Student Organized Symposia: Preparative Mass Spectrometry: Recent Advances & Applications *(ANYL)

P

How to Get Your 1st Industrial Job *(PROF)

A

TRiO & Chemistry *(PROF)

P

Celebrating the Success of an Exchange Program for German & American Chemistry Students *(CHED)

P

Student-Organized Symposia: New Paradigms in Nanoscale Electrocatalysis *(ANYL)

A

Non-Traditional Careers in Chemistry *(CHAL)

A

Next-Generation Instrumentations & Measurement in Space Exploration *(ANYL)

P

Women of Color in the Academy: Empirical Studies & Models of Success *(PROF)

A

P

Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in Honor of Barbara Belmont *(PROF)

Student-Organized Symposia: New Mass Spectrometry Methods for Polymer Analysis *(ANYL)

P

Student-Organized Symposia: Probing Biological Systems with Nonlinear Optics *(ANYL)

P

Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award: Symposium in Honor of Rachel O’Reilly *(PMSE)

P

Women in Nanotechnology *(INOR)

D

TRiO & Chemistry *(PROF)

P

Student-Organized Symposia: Enabling Spectroscopies for Nanomaterial Applications: Energy Conversion to Therapeutics *(ANYL)

Broadening Participation in STEM: Empirical Studies & Models of Success *(PROF)

D

2018 Energy & Fuels Joint Award for Excellence in Publication: Symposium in honor of Fateme Rezaei *(ENFL)

P

Non-Traditional Careers in Chemistry *(CHAL)

D

A *Co-sponsored symposium with primary organizer shown in parenthesis; located with primary organizer. **Primary organizer of a cosponsored symposium. CIGE: Chemistry’s Impact on the Global Economy A = AM  AE = AM/EVE  D = AM/PM  DE = AM/PM/EVE  E = EVE P = PM  PE = PM/EVE NNB = Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

69

TECHNICAL PROGRAM SUMMARY

S O CE D

Society Committee on Education

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

Technical Program

PRES

PRESIDENTIAL EVENTS P. Dorhout, Program Chair

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB J. M. Pickel, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 PRES 1. Safety in the context of the ACS Strategic Plan. R. Stuart 9:10 PRES 2. Promoting safety culture: chemical safety information initiatives. C.I. Nitsche 9:40 PRES 3. Communicating chemical safety. K.B. Jeskie 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 PRES 4. Developing student leadership skills in academic laboratory safety. K.A. Serrano 10:55 PRES 5. A step in the right direction. D. Mason 11:25 PRES 6. Talking safety: Why safety matters. J.L. Maclachlan 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB J. M. Pickel, Organizer, Presiding 1:15 Introductory Remarks. 1:20 PRES 7. Developing an education path for all chemists. D.C. Finster 1:50 PRES 8. Building an ecosystem of chemical safety information. L.R. McEwen, R. Stuart 2:20 PRES 9. Green chemistry’s role in promoting safety. J.E. Wissinger 2:50 Panel Discussion. 3:20 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry as a Second Language: Strategies for Global Scientific Communication Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by CPRC, IAC and PRES‡

Importance of LGBTQ+ Role Models & Mentors in Chemical Sciences: A Symposium in honor of Barbara Belmont Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CMA, PRES‡ and WCC

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond Opening Session Sponsored by MPPG, Cosponsored by PRES‡

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

70

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers

Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB H. Christen, A. L. Frischknecht, D. Prendergast, Organizers M. Chi, T. Rajh, D. Su, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 PRES 10. The need for fundamental understanding over multiple length scales: New applications demand new battery chemistries to achieve previously unrealized functionality. E.S. Takeuchi, K.J. Takeuchi, A.C. Marschilok 8:35 PRES 11. Molecular-scale understanding of the structure and dynamics of materials at electrified interfaces. D. Prendergast 8:50 PRES 12. Corralling electrons and ions in vanadium oxides: Tales from some rugged energy landscapes. S. Banerjee 9:20 PRES 13. Exploring chemical heterogeneities in alkali metal ion cathode materials. F. Lin 9:50 PRES 14. In situ study of ion ordering and transport by electron microscopy techniques. M. Liu, D. Su, J.T. Sadowski, 10:05 Intermission. 10:30 PRES 15. Enabling metallic Li anodes through solidstate electrolytes. J. Sakamoto 11:00 PRES 16. Emerging microscopy techniques for probing interfacial ion transport. M. Chi, N. Balke 11:15 PRES 17. The anode/electrolyte interface for magnesium batteries. T.S. Arthur 11:45 PRES 18. Defect-driven electrode materials for energy storage systems. H. Xiong

Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB M. Chi, H. Christen, T. Rajh, D. Su, Organizers A. L. Frischknecht, D. Prendergast, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 PRES 26. Unconventional computing with memristive devices and arrays. J. Yang 2:00 PRES 27. From lithium ion batteries to memristors – theory and modeling of ionic transport. M. Chan 2:15 PRES 28. NMR techniques to measure hydrophilic nanophase domain structure and water transport in polymer exchange membranes. T.M. Alam, E.G. Sorte, C. Fujimoto, A.L. Frischknecht 2:45 Intermission. 3:10 PRES 29. In situ investigation of dynamic transformations and mechanical degradation in battery materials. M. McDowell, M. Boebinger, N. Kondekar, F. Cortes, J. Lewis 3:40 PRES 30. Center for integrated nanotechnologies computational and experimental techniques for ion transport user science. K. Jungjohann, R. Dingreville, M.J. Stevens, A.L. Frischknecht 3:55 PRES 31. In-situ electrochemical S/TEM of lithium-ion batteries with Sn and Sn@TiO2 anodes. S. Goriparti, K.L. Harrison, K.L. Jungjohann 4:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Sheraton Boston Hotel Back Bay D

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB J. J. Pak, Organizer D. L. Warner, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 PRES 19. Project SEED: An audacious experiment turns 50. M.S. Jacobs 8:55 PRES 20. Relationship. Relevance. Reach. T. Gray 9:15 PRES 21. Project SEED: From farm to pharma. K. Hunt 9:35 PRES 22. The SEED to a career in analytical chemistry. A. Norelus 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 PRES 23. The explosive impact of Project SEED. D.E. Chavez 10:25 PRES 24. Project SEED as a catalyst for careers in STEM. R. Sharma 10:45 PRES 25. Project SEED: The nucleus of my career. R. Aviles-Mercado 11:05 Panel Discussion: The Impact of Project SEED. 11:25 Concluding Remarks. P. Dorhout

Artificial Intelligence & its Impact on The Chemical Enterprise

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CEI‡, COMSCI and PRES

TUESDAY MORNING Advances in Human Space Exploration: Second ACS NASA Symposium Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by PRES

TUESDAY AFTERNOON The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative Sponsored by MPPG, Cosponsored by PRES

Advances in Human Space Exploration: Second ACS NASA Symposium Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by PRES

MPPG

Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group P. Weiss, Program Chair

Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by BMGT and PRES‡

SUNDAY MORNING

Synthetic Biology: The State of the Science

SECTION B

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CEI‡, COMSCI and PRES

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy Cosponsored by INOR H. Fan, M. Knez, Organizers S. S. Wong, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 MPPG 1. Nano-metallurgical silicon - a novel energy material. R.B. Wehrspohn

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom West

Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond Opening Session Cosponsored by PRES‡ P. S. Weiss, Organizer, Presiding 4:00 Introductory Remarks. 4:05 MPPG 7. 21st century medicine will transform healthcare: Opportunities for nanoscience and chemistry. L. Hood 4:55 Closing Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy Cosponsored by INOR M. Knez, S. S. Wong, Organizers H. Fan, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 MPPG 8. Nanostructured conversion materials for next generation Li and Li-ion batteries. G. Yushin 1:35 MPPG 9. Benefits and challenges of nanomaterials in electrochemical energy storage systems: Insights gained from multiscale (molecular- to meso-scale) characterization and theory. A.C. Marschilok, K.J. Takeuchi, E.S. Takeuchi 2:05 MPPG 10. Advanced anode materials for highperformance potassium ion batteries. S. Guo 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 MPPG 11. A sulfur-limonene based electrode for lithium-sulfur batteries: High-performance by self-protection. Y. Yu 3:20 MPPG 12. Atomic/molecular layer deposited inorganic-organic thin-film structures for energy harvesting and storage. M. Karppinen 3:50 MPPG 13. Function-oriented nanostructured polymeric gels for sustainable energy. G. Yu

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Harvesting & Storage J. Huang, M. S. Leite, M. T. McDowell, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 MPPG 14. Spectroscopic studies and coordinative interaction of Chitosan-azo dyes towards selected first row transition metals. O. Ejeromedoghene 1:30 MPPG 15. Spectroscopy of plasmonic Pd-Au alloy nanoparticle photocatalysts. R.J. Dillon, J.P. McClure, K.N. Grew, C.A. Lundgren 1:50 MPPG 16. A theoretical study on the mechanism of conductivity enhancement in PEDOT:PSS by solvent treatment. E. Yildirim, W. Gang, S. Yang 2:10 MPPG 17. Modulation of carrier type in nanocrystalin-matrix composites by interfacial doping. R. Sharma, A.M. Sawvel, D. Nordlund, A. Dong, R. Buonsanti, Z. Liu, J. Urban, D.J. Milliron 2:30 MPPG 18. Molecular dynamics investigation of behavior of ionic liquids under high applied pressure. S. Sharma, H. Kashyap

2:50 Intermission. 3:00 MPPG 19. Design of electronic nanodevices with the novel layered nanostructure MXene. S. Du 3:20 MPPG 20. Ultrastrong aramid nanofiber membranes for dendrite-proof and heat-resistant battery separators. M. Wang 3:40 MPPG 21. Partially reduced graphene oxide-TiO2 nanorods photocatalyst for degrading aqueous hazardous pollutants. T. Peng, J.A. Lalman, F. Arefi-Khonsari 4:00 MPPG 22. Carbon nanotube as a durable oxygen reduction electrode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell. D. Lee, H. Kim 4:20 Closing Remarks.

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy H. Fan, S. S. Wong, Organizers M. Knez, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 MPPG 24. Synthesis and applications of novel twodimensional nanomaterials. H. Zhang 9:05 MPPG 25. Electronic and micromagnetic characterization of nanoferrites for sustainable energy applications. G. Papaefthymiou Davis, C. Lewis, A.L. Tiano, S.S. Wong 9:35 MPPG 26. Pervaporation separation of water – organic azeotropic mixtures using hydrophilic Poly (vinyl alcohol) nanocomposite membranes. T. Jose, S.C. George, S. Thomas 9:50 MPPG 27. Photocatalytic removal of NOx pollutants in flue gas: Fundamentals, applications and future. C. Yu, J. Wu, V. Nguyen, J. Lasek 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 MPPG 28. Interfacial chemistry as an enabling tool in the development of colloidal photo- and electro-catalysts. B.M. Cossairt, D. Henckel, D. Ung, T. Robison 10:50 MPPG 29. Flexible and conducting nanofibers functionalized with photoactive ZnO for advanced water treatment. G. Capilli, P. Calza, C. Minero, M. Cerruti 11:05 MPPG 30. Unraveling the electron transport and masking properties of g-C3N4 in Ni/Fe nanoparticle for enhanced TCE dechlorination. R. Sahu, R. Doong 11:20 MPPG 31. Synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials for sustainable energy applications. H. Cheng, H. Zhang 11:35 MPPG 32. Submonolayered Ru deposited on ultrathin Pd nanosheets used for enhanced catalytic applications. X. Cui, Z. Zhang, H. Zhang

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 258A

2018 C&EN Talented 12 B. Campos Seijo, L. Jarvis, Organizers L. K. Wolf, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 MPPG 23. 2018 C&EN Talented 12. L.K. Wolf

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

Spotlight on Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond in the Journal of the American Chemical Society S. Krane, Organizer P. J. Stang, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 MPPG 33. Bio-inspired nanochannels with superwettability. Y. Tian 9:10 MPPG 34. DNA nanostructures for cellular delivery of therapeutics. H.F. Sleiman 9:45 MPPG 35. Surface encoding of nanoparticles for selfassembly and plasmonic bioapplications. Y. Weizmann 10:20 MPPG 36. Skin-inspired organic bioelectronic. Z. Bao 10:55 MPPG 37. From molecules to dynamic molecular systems. B. Feringa

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Synthesis & Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy Cosponsored by INOR H. Fan, M. Knez, Organizers S. S. Wong, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 MPPG 38. Integrated micro-thermoelectric coolers by template assisted electrochemical deposition. H. Reith, N. Perez Rodriguez, G. Lee, G. Schierning, K. Nielsch 1:35 MPPG 39. Material characterizations by nanoscale X-ray imaging. Y. Chu, H. Yan, X. Huang, M. Ge, E. Nazaretski, N. Bouet, P. Ilinski 2:05 MPPG 40. Technique for characterization of buried interfaces at nanoscale. A. Dolocan 2:20 MPPG 41. In situ x-ray spectroscopy of nanocrystals undergoing cation exchange processes. R.W. Meulenberg 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 MPPG 42. Earth abundant and non-toxic FeS2 nanocrystals for photovoltaic and catalytic applications. C. Chen 3:05 MPPG 43. Domain size, layer number and morphology control for graphene by chemical vapour deposition. Z. Luo, I.H. Abidi, R. Xue 3:20 MPPG 44. Understanding the spontaneous out of plane growth of ReS2 and its application in energy harvesting. D. Ghoshal, A. Yoshimura, T. Gupta, A.N. House, Y. Chen, T. Wang, J. Hatchel, J. Idrobo, S. Basuray, S. Shi, N. Koratkar 3:35 MPPG 45. Biomimetic engineering of solid composite electrolytes for flexible, rechargeable zinc batteries. M. Wang, N. Kotov 3:50 MPPG 46. Bio-inspired controllable liquid transfer by topological asymmetric fibers. H. Liu, L. Jiang

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

Future of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond P. Alivisatos, H. Atwater, J. M. Buriak, L. E. Fernandez, C. Toro, Organizers P. S. Weiss, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 MPPG 47. Opportunities for nanomaterials in storage applications: the importance of surfaces and interfaces. E. Reichmanis, Y. Kwon, K. Minnici 1:30 MPPG 48. Synthesizing renewable fuels and chemical feedstocks using nanomaterials. E. Sargent 1:55 MPPG 49. Ultrafast photoresponse of 2D materials. A. Sood 2:20 MPPG 50. Nanoelectronic tools for brain science. C.M. Lieber 2:45 MPPG 51. Reconfigurable plasmonics. T.W. Odom 3:10 MPPG 52. Towards predictable and deterministic synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals. Y. Xia 3:35 MPPG 53. Manipulating crystallization and assembly of nanomaterials via fluidic engineering. Y. Li, Y. Chen, H. Wang, Y. Li

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom West

The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Lecture P. K. Dorhout, Organizer, Presiding 4:00 Introductory Remarks. 4:05 MPPG 54. Metal-ligand chemistry in nanoparticle synthesis and performance. J. Millstone 4:55 Q&A.

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

9:05 MPPG 2. Design-rules for preparation of multicomponent metal chalcogenide nanostructures from sol-gel assembly: Optimizing heterogeneity and interfacial bonding for energy applications. I. Hewavitharana, J. Davis, S.L. Brock 9:35 MPPG 3. Designing hybrid nanostructures for energyrelated applications. D. Ma 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 MPPG 4. Nanometer contact layers determining the photovoltage of perovskite solar cells. J. Bisquert 10:50 MPPG 5. Shining a light on ultra-stability in nanomaterials for energy-efficient solid-state lighting. J.A. Hollingsworth 11:20 MPPG 6. Template nanostructuring for energy conversion and storage devices. Y. Lei

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

MPPG/AGFD SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom West

The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture P. K. Dorhout, Organizer, Presiding 5:15 Introductory Remarks. 5:20 MPPG 55. Light as fuel. H. Atwater 6:10 Concluding Remarks.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Nanophotonics J. H. Hafner, N. J. Halas, P. J. Nordlander, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 MPPG 56. Plasmon enhanced photocatalysis. P.J. Nordlander 9:05 Q&A. 9:10 MPPG 57. Elucidating plasmon resonances using quantum mechanical methods. C.M. Aikens 9:40 Q&A. 9:45 MPPG 58. Acousto-plasmonic interaction: From Fermi golden rule to Raman energy density. N. Large 10:15 Q&A. 10:20 MPPG 59. Nonlinear-like optics in liquid suspensions of two-dimensional nanomaterials. J. Bao 10:50 Q&A. 10:55 MPPG 60. Lattice plasmon laser modeling. D. Wang, W. Wang, D.J. Trivedi, T.W. Odom, G.C. Schatz 11:25 Q&A. 11:30 MPPG 61. Designer 2D metals and Weyl semimetals for zero-loss photonics. P. Narang 12:00 Q&A. 12:05 Closing Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

ACS Nano Lectureship Award L. E. Fernandez, Organizer P. S. Weiss, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 MPPG 62. Metallic nanoislands on graphene as sensors for measuring cell stiffness and electrophysiology. D.J. Lipomi 9:20 MPPG 63. Nano materials for skin-inspired electronics. Z. Bao 10:00 MPPG 64. Ten years of liquid phase exfoliation: Making nanosheets for applications in energy, sensing and electronics. J.N. Coleman 10:40 MPPG 65. Investigation of etching behavior of singlewalled carbon nanotubes using different etchants. J. Zhang 11:20 MPPG 66. The adventure with graphene: From science to industry. Z. Liu 12:00 Closing Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

Nanoscience & Nanotechnology in Neuroscience & the BRAIN Initiative A. M. Andrews, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 MPPG 67. Fabrication of aptamer field-effect transistor microprobes towards In vivo neurotransmitter detection. C. Zhao, I. Huang, N. Nakatsuka, P.S. Weiss, H.G. Monbouquette, A.M. Andrews 9:25 MPPG 68. Generation of a compact quantum dot conjugate for single molecule imaging of dopamine transporters in acute brain slices. L.B. Thal, V.R. Mann, D. Sprinzen, B.E. Cohen, D.G. McMahon, S.J. Rosenthal 9:45 MPPG 69. Chemistries to repurpose Feraheme as multifunctional nanoparticles for cell labeling. H. Yuan, M.Q. Wilks, B. Cortese, A. Jones, G. El Fakhri, L. Josephson, M.D. Normandin 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 MPPG 70. Mechanistic investigations of stem-loop aptamer field-effect transistors. N. Nakatsuka, K. Yang, K.M. Cheung, J.M. Abendroth, X. Xu, C. Zhao, P.S. Weiss, M. Stojanovic, A.M. Andrews

72

10:40 MPPG 71. Antibody recruiting polymers as a tumor immunotherapeutic targeting strategy. A. Rullo

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109B

Nano in Tissue Engineering A. Khademhosseini, M. Stevens, Organizers S. Shin, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 MPPG 72. Nanomedicine in a world of immunotherapy. S. Sengupta 9:40 MPPG 73. Tools for accelerated medical innovation. J. Karp 10:10 MPPG 74. Molecular programming with DNA/ RNA. P.L. Yin 10:40 MPPG 75. From energy harvesting to living plants Concepts in biosensing and energy conversion using carbon nanomaterials. M. Strano 11:10 Concluding Remarks.

Recent Developments in the Protection of Nanotechnology-Related Intellectual Property

The Role of the Chemical Sciences in Brain Research & the BRAIN Initiative Cosponsored by PRES A. C. Collins, M. M. Kirchhoff, Organizers J. V. Sweedler, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 MPPG 87. Nanoscience and nanotechnology and the NIH BRAIN Initiative. W. Koroshetz 2:05 MPPG 88. Electrophysiology: Unplugged. Using chemistry to watch the brain in action. E. Miller 2:35 MPPG 89. The single cell chemical characterization of the cells in the brain. J.V. Sweedler 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 MPPG 90. Novel perspectives on psychiatric diseases with microengineered, electrochemical detection platforms. P. Hashemi 3:45 MPPG 91. Transcriptome variability and theories of phenotype – Multimodal subcellular genomics. J. Eberwome, J. Kim 4:15 MPPG 92. Neuron-like electronics: A new paradigm for noninvasive brain probes. C.M. Lieber

Sponsored by CHAL, Cosponsored by MPPG

WEDNESDAY MORNING

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

SECTION A

SECTION A

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Nanophotonics

Patterson-Crane Award Symposium S. Trohalaki, P. S. Weiss, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 MPPG 76. Communicating opportunities in nanoscience and nanotechnology. P.S. Weiss 1:45 Discussion. 1:50 MPPG 77. What does an ACS editor do, in 2018? Much more than ‘just’ editing. J.M. Buriak 2:25 Discussion. 2:30 MPPG 78. Treating molecular nanotechnology to show and tell. J.F. Stoddart 3:05 Discussion. 3:10 MPPG 79. Communicating science, especially nanoscience, to and from the federal government: A personal perspective. L.J. Whitman 3:45 Discussion. 3:50 MPPG 80. Telling stories. G.M. Whitesides 4:25 Discussion. 4:30 Closing Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

Nanophotonics J. H. Hafner, N. J. Halas, P. J. Nordlander, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 MPPG 81. Understanding the mechanism of plasmonic photocatalysis with ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. E.L. Keller, J.L. Brooks, R.R. Frontiera 1:35 Q&A. 1:40 MPPG 82. Strong coupling between single quantum dots and plasmon resonances: From Fano interference to Rabi splitting. M. Pelton 2:10 Q&A. 2:15 MPPG 83. Anisotropic plasmonic light scattering. J. Wang 2:45 Q&A. 2:50 MPPG 84. Single molecule imaging using atomistic near-field tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. L. Jensen 3:20 Q&A. 3:25 MPPG 85. Coherent plasmon dynamics from ultrafast correlated light and electron microscopy (UCLEM). K.L. Knappenberger 3:55 Q&A. 4:00 MPPG 86. Carrier dynamics in plasmonic nanostructures. S. Link 4:30 Q&A. 4:35 Closing Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 103

J. H. Hafner, N. J. Halas, P. J. Nordlander, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 MPPG 93. Unusual molecular vibrational excitation induced by gap-plasmons. Z. Kim 9:05 Q&A. 9:10 MPPG 94. Surface plasmon-mediated chemical vapor deposition of palladium nanoparticles for photothermal catalysis. W. Wei 9:40 Q&A. 9:45 MPPG 95. Spatial and temporal coherence of ultrafast plasmon nanolasers. T.W. Odom 10:15 Q&A. 10:20 MPPG 96. Optimizing the hybridization between localized surface plasmons and photonic cavity modes in a photothermal absorption spectrometer. D.J. Masiello 10:50 Q&A. 10:55 MPPG 97. In Situ spectroscopy of photocatalytic and plasmon resonant nanostructures. S. Cronin 11:25 Q&A. 11:30 MPPG 98. Mini gold nanorods and their plasmonic properties. C.J. Murphy 12:00 Q&A. 12:05 Closing Remarks.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

Nanophotonics J. H. Hafner, N. J. Halas, P. J. Nordlander, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 MPPG 99. Time-dependent electronic structure methods for plasmon-molecule interactions. A.E. DePrince 1:35 Q&A. 1:40 MPPG 100. Single nanoelectrode photodissolution. C.F. Landes, S. Link 2:10 Q&A. 2:15 MPPG 101. Antenna-reactor complexes for plasmonic photocatalysis. N.J. Halas 2:45 Q&A. 2:50 MPPG 102. Nanophotonic approaches to observe and control atomic and molecular processes. J. Dionne 3:20 Q&A. 3:25 MPPG 103. Quantifying plasmonic field enhancement and ultrasensitive displacement sensing by plasmonic nanogap. H. Xu 3:55 Q&A. 4:00 Closing Remarks.

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156B

New Advances in 3D Nanoprinting Financially supported by Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation A. Khademhosseini, Organizer G. Liu, Organizer, Presiding J. Belak, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 MPPG 104. Quantification of particle concentrations in ultra-pure liquid samples. J. Nadeau, M. Bedrossian, C. Lindensmith, C. Barr 9:05 Discussion. 9:10 MPPG 105. Three-dimensional nanoprinting using continuous assembly of polymers via ring-opening metathesis polymerisation. T. Pattison, G. Liu 9:25 Discussion. 9:30 MPPG 106. Development of methods for hierarchical self-assembly at the nanoscale. C.L. Berrie, S.B. Ulapane, N.J. Kamathewatta, A.K. Borkowski, S. Steuart 9:55 Discussion. 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 MPPG 107. Fast and smart atomic force microscopy for 3D nanoprinting. D. Hanna 10:40 Discussion. 10:45 MPPG 108. New algorithm to enable construction and display of 3D structures from scanning probe microscopy images acquired layer-by-layer. S. Wang, G. Liu 11:00 Discussion. 11:05 MPPG 109. Pinpoint additive manufacturing of complex 3D micro structures of pure metal. P. Doerig 11:30 Discussion. 11:35 MPPG 110. Recreating human physiology on a chip: A tale of microreactors, 3D printed tissues and real-time biosensors. A. Khademhosseini 12:00 Discussion. 12:05 Closing Remarks.

THURSDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 159

New Advances in 3D Nanoprinting Financially supported by Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation G. Liu, Organizer A. Khademhosseini, Organizer, Presiding C. L. Berrie, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 MPPG 111. Nanoscale light-based 3D bioprinting: An enabling technology for regenerative medicine. S. Chen 1:35 Discussion. 1:40 MPPG 112. 3D nanoprinting of star polymers. J. Zhang, V.A. Piunova, A. Tek, Y. Liu, J. Frommer, J. Sly, G. Liu 1:55 Discussion. 2:00 MPPG 113. The extension and application of the exascale additive manufacturing tools to 3D nanoprinting. J. Belak, J. Turner, C. Bronkhorst 2:25 Discussion. 2:30 Intermission. 2:45 MPPG 114. Additive manufacaturing and architected materials: From the nanoscale to the macroscale. C. Spadaccini 3:10 Discussion. 3:15 MPPG 115. Regio-selective and density-controlled activation of interfacial mechanophores for fabrication of complex structures. A. Sulkanen, J. Sung, M.J. Robb, J. Moore, N.R. Sottos, G. Liu 3:30 Discussion. 3:35 MPPG 116. Gold nanorods and cells in 3D. C.J. Murphy 4:00 Discussion. 4:05 MPPG 117. Investigating the properties of nanostructured surfaces by second order nonlinear spectroscopy. N. Ge 4:30 Discussion. 4:35 Closing Remarks.

AGFD

Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry X. Fan, Program Chair OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Ask Dr. Safety: Safety Considerations in the Cannabis Industry (see CHAS, Sun) Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices (see AGRO, Mon, Wed) Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides (see AGRO, Tue, Wed) Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends (see AGRO, Tue, Wed) SOCIAL EVENTS: Awards Banquet, 5:30 PM: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting, 12:15 PM: Tue

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

Functional Foods Their Novel Biofunctions & Underlying Mechanisms Cosponsored by AGRO Financially supported by Japanese Society for Food Factors D. Hou, A. Murakami, J. Terao, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 1. Potato peels: Chemistry, health benefits, and functional properties in human foods and animal feeds. M. Friedman 8:25 AGFD 2. Management of lung disease by tomato, lycopene. A. Koichi 8:45 AGFD 3. Effects of ginger extract on TMAO-induced atherogenesis. Z. He, Z. Chen 9:05 AGFD 4. Curcumin as a functional food-derived factor: Highly dispersible and bioavailable curcumin but not native curcumin effectively induces brown-like adipocyte formation in mice. T. Tsuda 9:25 AGFD 5. Prebiotics and antibiotics affect isoflavone metabolism and bone loss. M. Uehara, S. Fujii, H. Inoue, R. Katsumata-Tsuboi, N. Takahashi 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 AGFD 6. Hormesis: Adaptive responses in biology and medicine with applications to the emerging field of functional foods. E.J. Calabrese 10:20 AGFD 7. Stress-mediated mechanisms underlying bioactivities of phytochemicals. A. Murakami, A. Ishisaka, S. Tanioka, R. Sugimoto, M. Fujimoto 10:40 AGFD 8. The interaction between brain activation and peripheral physiological alteration following ingestion of flavan 3-ols. N. Osakabe 11:00 AGFD 9. Gastrointestinal health and functional foods. C. Wang 11:20 AGFD 10. Flavonoids enhance in vitro antiinflammatory activity of bifidobacteria by inducing the secretion of a small active molecule. K. Kawabata, N. Baba, T. Sakano, Y. Hamano, S. Taira, A. Tamura, S. Baba, M. Natsume, T. Ishii, S. Murakami, H. Ohigashi

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

MCPD & Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters M. Granvogl, S. MacMahon, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 11. Current research at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration related to the analysis of MCPD and glycidyl esters in refined oils and processed foods. J.K. Beekman, K. Grassi, S. MacMahon, J. Kuhlmann, A. Becalski, G. Jaudzems, F. Robert 8:35 AGFD 12. Detection limits and challenges in low level analysis of MCPD and glycidol using AOCS method Cd 29c13. K.J. Adlaf, M. Collison

9:05 AGFD 13. Determination of the food-borne contaminants 3-MCPD, 2-MCPD and glycidol in compound foods based on a new extraction approach and GC-MS measurement. J. Kuhlmann 9:35 AGFD 14. MCPD in fried and smoked fishery products. J. Fritsche, S. Merkle, U. Ostermeyer 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 AGFD 15. MCPD and glycidyl fatty acid esters: Molecular mechanisms of toxicity and new human exposure marker for biomonitoring. A. Braeuning, T. Buhrke, K. Schultrich, B. Monien, K. Abraham, A. Lampen 10:50 AGFD 16. Absorption and metabolism of 3 MCPD 1 monopalmitate after oral administration in rats. B. Gao, M. Liu, G. Huang, J. Liu, L.L. Yu 11:20 AGFD 17. MCPD and GE: Bridging toxicological risk assessment and regulatory management. P. Hanlon

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Bioactives & Neurodegenerative Diseases Cosponsored by MEDI H. Ma, N. P. Seeram, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGFD 18. Epigenetic modulation of inflammation and synaptic plasticity promotes resilience against stress in mice. J. Wang, G. Pasinetti 8:50 AGFD 19. Surface plasmon resonance and related biophysical techniques for the studies of amyloid peptide and protein aggregation and the Inhibition of aggregation by natural products. X. Wang, H. Li, H. Ma, N.P. Seeram, F. Zhou 9:30 Intermission. 9:45 AGFD 20. Olive-derived oleocanthal as a novel natural product to restore brain function in AD mouse models. A. Kaddoumi 10:25 AGFD 21. Berry polyphenols are associated with enhanced cognition and reduced inflammation in healthy, older adults. B. Shukitt-Hale, M.G. Miller, D.R. Fisher, D.F. Bielinski, T.M. Scott 11:05 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Health Promoting Food Ingredients A. M. Rimando, Organizer C. Osorio Roa, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 22. Polyphenols: The source of bioactives in plant foods for heart disease protection. J.A. Vinson 8:30 AGFD 23. Soluble and insoluble-bound food phenolics and phenolic derivatives. F. Shahidi, J. Yeo 8:55 AGFD 24. Berry fruit differentially improves agerelated decrements in behavior based on baseline status. B. Shukitt-Hale, M.G. Miller, D.F. Bielinski, D.R. Fisher 9:20 AGFD 25. Dietary polyphenols retard acrolein exposure in in vivo studies. Y. Zhu, Q. Huang, L. Lv, S. Sang 9:45 Intermission. 9:55 AGFD 26. The impact of polyphenol rich food on bacterially derived metabolites. C.O. Chen 10:20 AGFD 27. Gut microbiota-mediated biotransformation of food components: The key for their biological functions. Z. Li, F. Li, Q. Wang, H. Xiao 10:45 AGFD 28. The effect of gut microbiota fermentation on cocoa powders receiving various treatments. J.W. Finley, Z. Li, M. Janes 11:10 AGFD 29. Microbiota diversity in an in vitro system digestion with different processed cocoa powders. M. Janes, M. Escoto, J. Brandao, Z. Li, J.W. Finley 11:35 AGFD 30. The use of meat extenders (white button mushrooms vs textured soy) in beef patties for to improve health. A.J. Kinchla

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

THURSDAY MORNING

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGFD Functional Foods Their Novel Biofunctions & Underlying Mechanisms Cosponsored by AGRO Financially supported by Japanese Society for Food Factors D. Hou, A. Murakami, J. Terao, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 31. Anti-thrombotic effect of garlic attributes inhibition of platelet function and coagulation pathway by allyl sulfide. T. Seki, T. Hosono, Y. Ozaki-Masuzawa 1:25 AGFD 32. Involvement of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase pathway in the resistant mechanisms against benzyl isothiocyanate in human colorectal cancer cells. Y. Nakamura 1:45 AGFD 33. New molecular target, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) toward to improving gastrointestinal health. Y. Mine 2:05 AGFD 34. The preventive effects and molecular mechanisms of berry polyphenols in experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). D. Hou 2:25 AGFD 35. Biological activity of carotenoids and their metabolites. X. Wang 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 AGFD 36. The impact of activating almonds on D-myoinositol phosphate and mineral bioavailability. A.E. Mitchell, L. Lee 3:20 AGFD 37. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of dietary flavonoids linked with phase-II conjugation and macrophagemediated metabolic conversions. Y. Kawai 3:40 AGFD 38. Incorporation of protein arrays into functional food research. R. Huang, H. Zhang, W. Huang, V.S. Jones, Y. Mao, J. Wilson 4:00 AGFD 39. Metabolic innovations for functional foods integrating redox biology and microbiome-induced bioprocessing. K. Shetty 4:20 AGFD 40. Hazards in foods: Natural antimicrobials to control foodborne pathogens. S. Garcia, N. Heredia 4:40 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

MCPD & Glycidyl Fatty Acid Esters M. Granvogl, S. MacMahon, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 41. Stability of food contaminants 3-MCPD-, 2-MCPD- and glycidyl fatty acid esters in different foods during long-term storage. J. Kuhlmann 1:35 AGFD 42. Occurrence of MCPD and glycidyl esters in human breast milk. B. Belkova 2:05 AGFD 43. Influence of industrial process on 3-MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in finished products. M. Le Breton, G. Jaudzems, F. Robert 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 AGFD 44. Results of experiments to reduce MCPD and glycidyl esters in edible fats and oils by ionic liquid treatment. F. Pudel, J. Heymann, B. Matthäus, K. Vosmann 3:20 AGFD 45. Organochlorines as the most significant precursors of 3-MCPD esters in Palm Oil: Investigation into their occurrence in a range of vegetable oils, structures and mechanism of formation. S. Tiong, N. Saparin, A. Nair, I. Berg, H. de Vette, M. Putri Ahmad Sabri, H. Teh, T. Ng, D. Adan, M. bin Md. Zain, B. Neoh, A. Md Noor, O. Lai, C. Tan, D. Appleton 3:50 AGFD 46. Effect of double washing of bleached palm oil on the formation of 3-MCPD, 2-MCPD and glycidyl esters. W.C. Silva, A.P. Arisseto, K.A. Sampaio, R.A. Ferrari, E. Vicente 4:20 AGFD 47. MCPD - public health implications. R. Clemens, P. Pressman

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Bioactives & Neurodegenerative Diseases Cosponsored by MEDI H. Ma, N. P. Seeram, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 48. In Vivo neuroprotective effects of Cannabis spp. bioactives in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. H. Park, M. Homan, D. Vattem 1:45 AGFD 49. Development of a general amyloid inhibitor against the aggregation and toxicity of both amyloid-β and hIAPP. J. Zheng 2:25 Intermission.

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2:40 AGFD 50. Neuroprotective effects of Mucuna pruriens seed extract against Parkinson’s disease in microglia and neuroblastoma cells, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster. S. Johnson, H. Park, N. DaSilva, D. Vattem, H. Ma, N.P. Seeram 3:20 AGFD 51. The ability of berries to mitigate the effects of high fat diet on brain and behavior. A. Carey 4:00 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Health Promoting Food Ingredients C. Osorio Roa, Organizer A. M. Rimando, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 52. Understanding bioactives in food through the analysis of human milk. C.B. Lebrilla 1:30 AGFD 53. Pomegranate fruit juice, dietary supplements and extracts rich in ellagitannins also provide a significant content of a wide range of proanthocyanidins. F. Tomas-Barberan, H. Díaz-Mula, R. García-Villalba 1:55 AGFD 54. Avenanthramides from commercial oat bran in the United States. Y. Tang, W. Wu, J. Yang, E. Idehen, S. Sang 2:20 AGFD 55. LC-ESI-MS characterization of the components of four varieties of blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum), grown in Illinois and Wisconsin after water-based sonication extraction and their inhibitory effects on α-amylase. R.E. Cortez, M.A. Berhow, E.G. Demejia 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 AGFD 56. Combination effects and molecular targets of apple peel powder and selected bioactive compounds on antiproliferative activity in human breast cancer cells in vitro. R.H. Liu 3:20 AGFD 57. Food bioactives that can extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Y. Park, P. Shen, Y. Yue, Y. Peng, Y. Xu, K. Kim 3:45 AGFD 58. Dietary intake of mildly oxidized fat increases colonic inflammation and colitis-associated colon tumorigenesis through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. G. Zhang 4:10 AGFD 59. Current evidence of beneficial effects of anthocyanins from colored corn in in vitro models of obesity and diabetes. D.A. Luna, E.G. Demejia 4:35 AGFD 60. In vitro bile acid binding capacities of selected vegetables to improve human health. I. F.Y., G.K. Jayaprakasha, B. Patil

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, D. Li, X. Wan, Y. Wang, Z. Zhang, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 AGFD 61. The CsRHMs encoding a UDP-rhamnose synthase is required for the development of cell wall. X. Dai AGFD 62. Influence of media supplements on inhibition of oxidative browning and bacterial endophytes of Camellia sinensis var. sinensis. S. Wei AGFD 63. Polyphenolic chemistry of tea. S. Feng, Y. Wang, C. Ho AGFD 64. From leaf to tea: The impact of six typical processing methods on the tea chemical profiling. Y. Wang, Z. Kan, T. Ling, J. Ning, D. Li, X. Wan AGFD 65. Extraction methods of volatile compounds isolated from dried Omija with different drying condition. M. Park, S. Yang, M. Park, K.G. Lee AGFD 66. Formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in caramel model system with different ammonium hydroxide concentration. J. Kwon, S. Kim, K.G. Lee AGFD 67. Quantification of ascorbyl adducts of epigallocatechin gallate and gallocatechin gallate in bottled tea beverages. W. Hung, S.S. Wang, S. Sang, X. Wan, Y. Wang, C. Ho

AGFD 68. (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate enhances cytotoxic effect of melatonin in cancer cells with diverged p21 response to melatonin. J. Zhang, C. Yang, L. Zhang AGFD 69. Potential role of tea consumption on circadian rhythm. M. Qing, C. Ho AGFD 70. Anti-Parkinsonian effects of β-amyrin of tea seed oil from Camellia tenuifolia in Caenorhabditis elegans. C. Wei, C. Ho, V. Liao AGFD 71. Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant, antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in sea buckthorn leaf. R. Guo, X. Guo, R.H. Liu, C. Ho AGFD 72. Suppression of cancer cell growth and migration by regulating Met/EGFR/VEGFR-Akt/NF-ĸB pathways with theanine and its derivatives. G. Zhang, Y. Zhang, S. Zhou, B. Wu, X. Wan

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL I. Edirisinghe, C. Lai, L. Liu, S. Sang, F. Tomas-Barberan, L. L. Yu, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 AGFD 73. Enterococcus faecalis FK-23 may improve the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil via enhancing ROS production and phagocytosis. H. Ichikawa, K. Kobayashi, Y. Minamiyama AGFD 74. Properties of Shikwasa (Citrus depressa) juice to improve lipid metabolism. R. Takeda, M. Matayoshi, A. Sawabe AGFD 75. Impact of dietary fiber from sweet potato fermented in vitro on the diversity of gut microbiota. X. Li, J. Tian, M. Liu AGFD 76. Assembly of mock microbial community for testing engineered microorganisms persistence and function. S. Arcidiacono, L.A. Doherty, J. Whitman, J.W. Soares AGFD 77. Development of an in vitro fermentation model of the small intestine. L.A. Doherty, J. Whitman, S. Arcidiacono, K.R. Conca, J.W. Soares AGFD 78. Choline kinase is a drug a target for Staphylococcus aureus. T. Zimmerman, S. Ibrahim

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

General Posters X. Fan, Organizer 5:30 – 7:30 AGFD 79. Fabrication and in vitro study of vitamin D nanodelivery system using Caco-2 cells: Applications in food and health. N. Walia, L. Chen AGFD 80. Effect of quercetin on the inhibition of CYR61mediated multidrug resistance in human adenocarcinoma AGS cells. S.K. Cho AGFD 81. Influence of storage temperature and duration on lipid oxidation in frozen dough. W. Zhao, J. Xu, X. Xu AGFD 82. Anthocyanin in purple carrot (Daucus carota L.): Their structures and effect for blood flow. A. Tsutsumi, Y. Horikoshi, A. Saito, R. Koizumi, Q. Hu, A. Koichi, N. Osakabe AGFD 83. Stress response in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) after a single dose of procyanidin supplementation. Y. Fujii, S. Kenta, H. Yahiro, K. Ai, N. Osakabe AGFD 84. Fingerprinting white wines with excitationemission matrix fluorescence. J.F. Hauri, B.K. Niece AGFD 85. Investigation of phenolic phytochemicals in Maine-grown plums. H. Hwang, R. Fort, R. Moran, A. Myracle, B.W. Cole AGFD 86. Determination of key volatile compounds related to sensory quality of Doenjang, a fermented soybean paste, using non-targeted and descriptive analyses. S.A. Kim, Y. Kim, I. Cho, S. Lee AGFD 87. Discoloration preventive agents of food and antiaging effects of the constituents in the seed of Foeniculum vulgare. A. Yamash*ta, A. Sawabe AGFD 88. Optimization by response surface methodology of phenolic compounds extraction from chaga (inonotus obliquus) using accelerated solvent extraction. W. Alhallaf, B. Perkins AGFD 89. Two main foliar diseases caused by Colletotrichum and Pestalotiopsis-like species on Camellia sinensis in China. Y. Chen, H. Tong AGFD 90. Establishment of a system for screening food factors inhibiting the absorption of Cs in intestine. M. Yasuda-Torii, C. Tokuyama, Y. Kobayashi, S. sh*tasue, S. Karaki, K. Shimoi

AGFD 118. Regional variations in essential oils components, antioxidant capacities, and antifungal activities of Piper nigrum L in China. C. Zhang, M. Liu, J. Tian AGFD 119. Encapsulating curcumin into bilayer nanoparticle by coaxial electrospraying. S. Tsai, Y. Ting, J. Wu AGFD 120. Quality evaluation of crustaceans using chemical analyses due to their freshness. D. Hong, E. Jung, S. Kim, S. Kim, Y. Lee AGFD 121. Increasing ῳ-3 fatty acid, α-tocopherol and acetic acid contents in fresh lamb by feeing entrapped fish oil, DL-α-tocopheryl acetate and L-acetic acid in a chemically treated protein matrix. C. Jeanjulien, J. Lee, S. Wildeus, A. Discua, D. Kafle AGFD 122. Chemistry of, and attitudes toward, artisanal food. C.T. Cirne, M.H. Tunick, R.E. Trout AGFD 123. Inhibition of Streptococcus and Enterococcus biofilms by cranberry bioactives. R. Magina, G. O’Brien, F.J. Scarano, C.C. Neto AGFD 124. The role of heat treatment on the chemistry of light oxidation flavor in fluid milk. W. Harwood, B. Carter, A. Schiano, M. Drake AGFD 125. Changes in peracetic acid based sanitizer systems under the influence of different storage temperatures and organic load. T. Ghostlaw, F. Martens, W. Autio, M. Corradini, A.J. Kinchla AGFD 126. Assessing the stability of glucoraphanin [by measurement of sulforaphane] in model food systems supplemented with broccoli powder. K. Kensil, K.R. Conca, T. Ndou, S. Fales AGFD 127. Trends of decreasing amino acids in food formulations with varying sugar and fat levels after storage and in-vitro digestion. K.R. Conca, K. Kensil AGFD 128. Neuronal protection effects of blueberries. P. Samani, R. Pacheco, S. Cai AGFD 129. Total carbohydrate composition of different molecular weight fractions in red wine. L. Ring, E. Tomasino, J. Osborne, M.C. Qian AGFD 130. Application of high-pressure processing for effective utilization of insoluble polymeric compounds in soy sauce lees. Y. Murabayashi, Y. Watanabe AGFD 131. Browning inhibition of fresh-cut “Granny Smith” apples and Listeria monocytogenes inactivation by the combinations of citric acid, ascorbic acid and acetylcysteine. X. Fan, K. Sokorai AGFD 132. Comparison of α-tocopherol levels in local Pennsylvania wheat flour and commodity wheat flour. E. Pollock, J. Trout, R. Trout AGFD 133. Pectin and whey protein concentrate minimizes the generation of acid whey in Greek style yogurt. R. Gyawali, T. Zimmerman, H. Colleran, S. Ibrahim AGFD 134. Impact of hydrocolloids on the water holding capacity of Greek style yogurt. S. Ibrahim, R. Gyawali, T. Zimmerman AGFD 135. Metabolite profiling of Candidatus Liberibacter infection in Hamlin sweet oranges. W. Hung, Y. Wang AGFD 136. Cyclodextrin effects on potato polyphenol oxidase-catalyzed reactions. S. Jiang, M.H. Penner AGFD 137. Research on age discrimination of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar based on odour active compounds. Z. Sun AGFD 138. Reinforcement of carrageenan graft gallic acid with micro-fibrillated cellulose. S. Lakshmibalasubramaniam, B. Nayak AGFD 139. Development of simultaneous muliresidue analysis for 395 pesticides in soybean using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Y. Shin, J. Lee, J. Lee, J. Lee, B. Kim, M. Rehan, J. Kim AGFD 140. Examining the effects of microfluidization on the physiochemical and coagulation properties of bovine milk. A.J. Bucci, D.L. Van Hekken, M.H. Tunick, J.A. Renye, P. Tomasula AGFD 141. Stereochemical and thermodynamic analysis of functionalized chocolate molecules and their derivatives: Applications in food and molecular chemistry. R. Kyung, J. Song AGFD 142. Phytochemical analisys of Spermacoce remota Lam, in search of understanding its phytochemical and ethno-pharmaceutical properties. G. Cruz Ruiz AGFD 143. Comparison of physicochemical and proximate properties of crude rice bran and processed rice (Oryza sativa) oils. S.A. Aderibigbe AGFD 144. The antioxidant activity of cold brew coffee. M. Fuller, N.Z. Rao AGFD 145. Wheatscan – unraveling the causes for wheat sensitivity. D. Pronin, K. Scherf

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials Cosponsored by POLY M. Appell, A. Biswas, H. Cheng, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 AGFD 146. Free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory capacities of cold-pressed seed flour extracts. U. Choe, Y. Li, B. Gao, L. Yu, T.T. Wang, J. Sun, P. Chen, L.L. Yu AGFD 147. Combining acid hydrolysis and alpha-amylase digestion for the production of porous potato starch. A. Gonzalez, Y. Wang AGFD 148. High-viscosity and healthy polysaccharides as an industrial by-product from citrus segment membrane. J. Chen, X. Ye, R.J. Linhardt AGFD 149. Microwave assisted technology for the value added textiles. S. Chang, B.D. Condon, J. Smith

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Chemistry Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, D. Li, Y. Wang, Z. Zhang, Organizers X. Wan, Organizer, Presiding C. Ho, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 150. Progress in tea chemistry from natural products approach. G. Bao, W. Wang, X. Li, J. Ke 8:30 AGFD 151. The complexity of the metabolism of tea polyphenols. S. Sang 8:55 AGFD 152. Tea is a dietary source of ellagitannins more relevant than previously thought. X. Yang, C.J. García, A.M. Blazquez, F. Tomas-Barberan 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 AGFD 153. Plant resources, chemistry and bioactivities of several wild tea plants in China. Y. Zhang, X. Meng, H. Zhu, D. Wang, C. Yang 10:00 AGFD 154. Characterization of Zijuan green tea metabolites: Comparison against Yunkang10 green tea by a non-targeted metabolomics approach. M. Li, H. Guo, D. Li, Z. Xie 10:20 AGFD 155. Triterpenoid saponins from the genus Camellia: Structures, biological activities, molecular simulation for structure-activity relationship. C. Cui 10:40 AGFD 156. Bifunctional properties of tea catechins: Mechanism of actions on antioxidation and anti-reactive carbonyl species. C. Ho

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Structure & Assembly of Food Biopolymers Cosponsored by POLY Q. Huang, Organizer, Presiding W. Jin, Y. Ting, Q. Wang, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 157. Characterization of zein-oleic acid assemblies by ultra-small angle X-ray scattering. G. Padua, S. Uzun 8:35 AGFD 158. Casein studied by X-ray and neutron scattering. G. Smith, E. Brok, G. Jensen, S. Midtgaard, N. Skar-Gislinge, L. Arleth 9:05 AGFD 159. Mechanistic understanding of the formation of edible spherical and tubular nanoparticles: Insights of the thermodynamics of interaction. L.F. Maldonado, S. Chough, T. Yilmaz, J. Kokini 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 AGFD 160. Development of soy glycinin microcapsule responsive to ionic strength and pH. Q. Wang, N. Chen, J. Zhang 10:20 AGFD 161. Flexible and more water-resistant edible films from caseinate, milk and alkali. L. Bonnaillie, P. Tomasula, M.H. Tunick 10:50 AGFD 162. Dissolution evaluation of Felodipine/ zein amorphous solid dispersions system as compared to commercial polymers HPMC-AS and PVP-VA. H. Zhang 11:20 AGFD 163. Application of cereal prolamin coixin for polymethoxyflavone encapsulation. X. Wang, Q. Huang

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

75

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGFD 91. Effect on the quality of raisin dried with cold atmospheric plasma pretreatment: Microstructure, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and color. F. Chang, Y. Ting, J. Wu AGFD 92. Effect of cooking on antioxidant activity of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivar with purple pods. M. HiemoriKondo AGFD 93. Chemical constituents and antimalarial activity of essential oils extracted from the stem, root and fruit peel of Citrus paradisi grown in Nigeria. O.E. Ogunjinmi, N.O. Olawore, A. Aliyu AGFD 94. Changes in flatus producing oligosaccharides in pulses cooked with various heating technologies and cooking solutions. E.M. Abdelaal, S. Ragaee, I. Rabalski, Y. Liu AGFD 95. Preparative separation of mono- and diiodinated fluoresceins from synthetic mixtures by pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography. R.A. Lazo Portugal, A. Weisz AGFD 96. Transformation of silica nanoparticles in response to food processing conditions and its effect on proteinnanoparticle interactions. W.H. Phue, S. George AGFD 97. Intrinsic luminescent probes as sensors to monitor structural properties and solvation in biodegradable films. L.A. Colaruotolo, C. Gonzalez Martinez, R. Bueno Lopez, H. Ball, R. Enfield, M. Corradini AGFD 98. Anti-aging effects of the constituents in the leaves of Callicarpa dichotoma. A. Sawabe, S. Tagashira, A. Yamash*ta, R. Takeda, A. Iida AGFD 99. Analysis of the relationship between Interleukin1β, body mass Index and body fat. N.O. Flynn, K. Mosher AGFD 100. ATR-FTIR analysis of beer. A. Campanella, M.D. Mosher AGFD 101. Starch and protein functional properties of whole pulse flours affected by germination of navy beans, pinto beans and lentils. M. Singh, J. Byars, M. Hojilla Evangelista AGFD 102. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of the novel bisphenol-A alternative, four bisguaiacol-F compounds, by in-vitro bioassays. Y. Peng, K. Reno, T.H. Epps, C. Wu AGFD 103. Analysis of antidiabetic constituents in Ocimum species. A.M. Rimando, M.M. Nickles, C.F. Williams, S.R. Mentreddy, S. Mathews AGFD 104. Computational and experimental research on the mechanism of cis/trans isomerization of oleic acid. J. Yin, S. Li, N. Cheng AGFD 105. Application and biological functionalization of biomass lignin for UV shielding. S. Lee, J. Choi, K. Won AGFD 106. Characterization of off-Taste compounds in potato fibers. C. Dawid, T. Duggan, T. Hofmann AGFD 107. Atmospheric cold plasma treatment enhanced mung bean germination and level of ᵧ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Y. Chou, Y. Ting, K. Cheng, J. Wu AGFD 108. Cold plasma treatment caused surface etching increased the yield of ginsenosides extraction. R. Wang, Y. Ting, J. Wu AGFD 109. Simple validated method for simultaneous determination of major type B trichothecenes and their 3-β-D-glucosides in the baby food and Korean rice wine by HPLC-UV detection and immunoaffinity cleanup. S. Lee, S. Woo, S. Kim, H. Chun AGFD 110. Effects of cold atmospheric plasma processing on vitamin C and phenolic content of orange juice. C. Chien, J. Wu, Y. Ting AGFD 111. Screening freshness of seafood by measuring trimethylamine (TMA) levels using Helium-Plasma Ionization mass spectrometry (HePI-MS). I.S. Herath, T.E. O’Donnell, A.B. Attygalle AGFD 112. Effects of atmospheric plasma pretreatment on the chemical characteristic of grape surface and drying rates of raisins. C. Huang, Y. Ting, J. Wu AGFD 113. Encapsulation of nobiletin in powdered nanoemulsion system: Enhanced storage stability and oral bioavailability. G. Lin, Y. Ting AGFD 114. Softer texture and higher gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content of germinated brown rice after treated by atmospheric non-thermal plasma. P. Chou, K. Cheng, Y. Ting AGFD 115. Effect of high pressure processing on enzyme activity and related antioxidant attributes of aronia berry puree. B. Yuan, M. Lu, M. Danao AGFD 116. Effects of phenylalanine concentration and cultivation time on the formation of styrene and volatile compounds by Penicillium expansum. H. Kim, M. Kim, J. Seo, Y. Kim AGFD 117. Metabolomic analysis for the metabolites of estrogenic pesticides with liver S9 fractions as in vitro hepatic model. J. Auh, G. Kim, H. Lee

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGFD Bioactives & Skin Health Cosponsored by MEDI K. M. George, H. Ma, N. P. Seeram, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 164. The skin whitening effect and mechanism of isoartocarpesin, a flavonoid from jackfruit. M. Wang, Y. Wu, S. Hu 8:35 AGFD 165. Study on the effect of collagen peptides on UV-induced photoaging mouse skin and its bioactive components. B. Li 9:05 Intermission. 9:20 AGFD 166. Oral administration of lipoteichoic acid from probiotic bacteria modulates cutaneous immune responses after ultraviolet exposure. D. González Maglio 9:50 AGFD 167. Skin anti-aging by polyphenolic botanicals via human dermal gene and protein expression analysis. E. Lephart 10:20 AGFD 168. Inhibitory effects of glucitol-core containing gallotannins from a proprietary red maple (Acer rubrum) leaves extract on elastase enzyme. H. Ma, N.P. Seeram 10:50 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Applied Nanotechnology for Food & Agriculture Cosponsored by AGRO S. Nam, B. Park, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 169. An optimized experimental and modeling approach for bulk protein and oil prediction in soybean using transmission Raman spectroscopy. R. Singh, T. Wrobel, P. Mukherjee, M.R. Kole, M. Gryka, S. Harrison, R. Bhargava 8:30 AGFD 170. Assembly of biocatalytic materials using material-binding proteins/peptides. S. Singh, T.C. Hinkley, S.R. Nugen, J. Talbert 8:55 AGFD 171. Growth mechanism of silver nanoparticles synthesized by water-based binary polyol reduction. S. Nam, B. Park, B.D. Condon 9:20 AGFD 172. Controlled release nanocomposite microcapsules for agricultural applications. K. Shanmuganathan, P. Shukla, S. Jagtap, V. Patil, A. Sapre 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 AGFD 173. High aspect ratio nanomaterials enable biomolecule delivery and transgene expression or silencing in mature plants. G. Demirer, H. Zhang, J. Matos, R. Chang, B. Staskawicz, M. Landry 10:25 AGFD 174. Nanotechnology-based solutions for the removal and real-time monitoring of phosphorous containing species for sustainable food and agricultural production. E. Andreescu, D. Andreescu, E. Dumitrescu, A. Othman 10:50 AGFD 175. Rapid, extraction-free, PCR-free meat species identification with electric field induced release and measurement (EFIRM). X. Sun, X. Lin, M. Dai, Y. Chen, M. Tu, Y. Mo, W. Liao 11:15 AGFD 176. Nanotoxicological indices at exposure for Vigna subterranea. E.O. Nwaichi, E. Anosike 11:40 Concluding Remarks.

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by AGFD

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

76

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Bioactivity Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, D. Li, X. Wan, Z. Zhang, Organizers Y. Wang, Organizer, Presiding Z. Xie, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 177. Studies on prevention of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer by tea. C. Yang 1:30 AGFD 178. Tea polyphenols for cancer chemoprevention. H. Xiao 1:55 AGFD 179. Disease chemopreventive effects and molecular mechanisms of tea polyphenols. M. Pan, Y. Chiou, C. Ho 2:20 AGFD 180. The mitochondria as a putative target for the actions of the green tea polyphenol, (-)epigallocatechin-3gallate. J. Lambert 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGFD 181. Effects of tea extracts on weight gain and gut microbiota in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. J. Liu, Z. Chen 3:25 AGFD 182. Tea polysaccharides as potential preventive and therapeutic options for metabolic disease: The key role of the gut microbiota. X. Zeng, G. Chen, D. Chen, P. Wan 3:45 AGFD 183. Green tea and its functional components modulate the gut microbiota in obese mice induced by highfat diet. K. Sun, J. Li, E. Aokorful, X. Chen, X. Li 4:05 AGFD 184. Tea crude powder consumption attenuates smoking-induced foam cell formation through inhibition of the α9-nicotinic-acetylcholine receptor expression in monocytes: An ex vivo study. L. Chen, C. Ho, Y. Ho

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Structure & Assembly of Food Biopolymers Cosponsored by POLY Q. Huang, Organizer, Presiding W. Jin, Y. Ting, Q. Wang, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 185. Amylose-guest inclusion complexes for extended release of cyclic organic compounds. L. Shi, L. Kong, G. Ziegler, H. Hopfer 1:35 AGFD 186. Starch molecule assembly for bioactive components delivery. X. Li, L. Chen, X. Huang, L. Li 2:05 AGFD 187. Characterization of starch-fatty acid complexes and starch-fatty acid complexes stabilized Pickering emulsions. X. Lu, Q. Huang 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 AGFD 188. Polysaccharide microgels with tunable properties and unique functions to solely stabilize high internal phase emulsions to enhance the stability of carotene. B. Hu 3:20 AGFD 189. Chemical window into RNAi silencing of the StNAC103 gene in potato tubers: Monitoring the impact on suberin deposition by profiling of polar and nonpolar metabolites and suberin-enriched tissues. K. Dastmalchi, O. Chira, M. Perez Rodriguez, M. Figueras, O. Serra, R.E. Stark 3:50 AGFD 190. A novel cage-like crosslinked porous starch preparation and application. F. Ning, H. Xiong, Q. Huang

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Bioactives & Skin Health Cosponsored by MEDI K. M. George, H. Ma, N. P. Seeram, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 AGFD 191. Health claims proposed under regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 in the framework of maintenance of skin function: Claimed effects, outcome variables and methods of measurement. D. Martini, D. Del RIo 1:40 AGFD 192. Investigation of mechanisms of photoaging and development of target-based skin care products. Y. Wan 2:10 Intermission. 2:25 AGFD 193. Inhibitory effects of 4’-demethylnobiletin, a major metabolite of nobiletin and 7,7’-bromo-curcumin, a bioactive analog of curcumin on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation. X. Wu, K. Rakariyatham, G. Zhang, H. Xiao 2:55 AGFD 194. Protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) phenolics against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human HaCaT keratinocytes. C. Liu, H. Guo, N. DaSilva, Y. Wan, H. Ma, N.P. Seeram

3:25 AGFD 195. Effect of collagen peptides intake on chronologically aged mouse skin. H. Song, B. Li 3:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Get Published: Panel Discussion with JAFC Editors Cosponsored by AGRO B. D. Guthrie, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 196. Guidance and tips for successful scientific publication in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. T. Hofmann 1:20 AGFD 197. How to show the originality and novelty of the study reported. F. Tomas-Barberan 1:35 AGFD 198. How to perform research on bioactive food constituents. V. Somoza 1:50 Panel Discussion.

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

Undergraduate Research Posters Agricultural & Food Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by AGFD and SOCED

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix X. Fan, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 68, 76, 78, 79, 83, 91, 96, 97, 99, 107, 111, 119, 123, 128, 135, 136, 140, 144, 146, 147, 155, 178, 180, 195. See previous listings. 234, 248, 298, 300, 307, 311, 316, 331, 347. See subsequent listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Bioactivity Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, X. Wan, Z. Zhang, Organizers D. Li, Y. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 199. Roasting process improves the hypoglycemic effect of large yellow tea by enhancing the inhibition effect of epimerized catechins on α-glucosidase. X. Wan, J. Zhou, L. Zhang 8:30 AGFD 200. Promotion of healthy lifespan by tea in Caenorhabditis elegans. L. Xiong, Y. Gong, Q. Liang, Z. Liu 8:55 AGFD 201. Flavonoids alleviating insulin resistance through inflammatory signaling. Y. Tu 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 AGFD 202. Receptor Na/K-ATPase, ECG and heart. Z. Xie 10:00 AGFD 203. Three tea catechins inhibit contraction of vascular smooth muscle. M. Yao, Z. Wang, Z. Shen, Z. Xie 10:20 AGFD 204. Anti-fibrotic activity of dominant tea polyphenols in rats. S. Li, G. Yang, H. Zhao, C. Ho 10:40 AGFD 205. Protective effect of oolong tea theasinensin A against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in mice. W. Hung, Y. Wang, Y. Chiou, Y. Tung, C. Ho, Y. Wang, M. Pan

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Structure & Assembly of Food Biopolymers Cosponsored by POLY Q. Huang, Organizer, Presiding W. Jin, Y. Ting, Q. Wang, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Taste & Aroma Modulators: Chemistry, Biology & Sensory J. A. Grover, B. D. Guthrie, D. B. Josephson, L. Kreger, T. Shao, M. Sucan, Y. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 AGFD 213. New insights into peripheral taste signaling pathways. K. Medler 9:20 AGFD 214. A whole taste papilla method to identify taste modifiers. B.D. Guthrie 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 AGFD 215. Multiple-modality, simultaneous modulation of tastes. D.B. Josephson 10:45 AGFD 216. Effect of taste modifier compounds (TMCs) on mice taste responses. A. Vandenbeuch, D.B. Josephson 11:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Young Scientist/JAFC Best Paper Awards Cosponsored by PROF K. D. Deibler, Organizer, Presiding 8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 AGFD 217. CD36 ligand activities of flavor volatiles in foods with an aldehyde moiety: Identification of saturated aliphatic aldehydes with 9–16 carbon atoms as potential ligands of the receptor. S. Tsuzuki, T. Amitsuka, T. Okahashi, Y. Kimoto, K. Inoue 9:05 Intermission. 9:20 AGFD 218. Processing-induced modification on food peptide structure and function. C. Udenigwe

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship Cosponsored by AGRO A. M. Rimando, Organizer, Presiding 11:00 Introductory Remarks. 11:05 AGFD 219. Pathogens and pesticides - Research topics in food and environmental safety. J.N. Seiber

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in honor of George P. Lahm Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Flavor Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, X. Wan, Y. Wang, Z. Zhang, Organizers D. Li, Organizer, Presiding Z. Xie, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 220. Identification of aroma-active compounds in tea. Y. Wang, S. Feng 1:30 AGFD 221. Aroma formation by tea leaf manufacturing processes. Z. Feng, Y. Li, Y. Wang, L. Zhang, X. Wan, X. Yang 1:55 AGFD 222. Elucidation of the key aroma compounds in Hojicha – a roasted green tea beverage (Camellia Sinensis) and comparison with a tea beverage prepared from unroasted, but steamed green tea. M. Flaig, P.H. Schieberle 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 AGFD 223. Biosyntheses of characteristic aroma compounds in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves and their formations in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Z. Yang 3:00 AGFD 224. Unraveling a crosstalk regulatory network of temporal aroma accumulation in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) leaves by integration of metabolomics and transcriptomics. C. Wei 3:20 AGFD 225. Aroma characterization of aged green tea using headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with GC/MS and GC–olfactometry. Q. Dai 3:40 AGFD 226. Chemical synthesis for a compound library of glycosidically bound tea aroma precursors and p-nitrophenyl β-D-primeveroside. K. Liu, X. Ku, J. Yu, W. Deng, Z. Zhang

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Food Bioactives, Nano-Technology & Other Delivery Systems Cosponsored by AGRO F. Shahidi, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 227. Delivery of ingredients and bioactive compounds to food. F. Shahidi, P. Ambigaiplalan 1:30 AGFD 228. Fabrication of chia (salvia hiSpanica L.) seed oil nanoemulsions using different emulsifiers. J. Teng, N. Tao, M. Wang 1:55 AGFD 229. Encapsulation, protection and controlled release of nutraceuticals using biopolymer microgels. Z. Zhang, R. Zhang, B. Zheng, D. McClements 2:20 AGFD 230. Silica-based delivery systems for oral delivery of drugs, enzymes and probiotics. A. Pasc, M. Girardon, N. Canilho 2:45 AGFD 231. Mobilization of lipophobicity of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs): An efficient encapsulation of phycobiliproteins. A.S. Patel, B. Nayak 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 AGFD 232. Compositional analyses of cultivars chrysanthemum and evaluations of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Y. Li, J. Sun, B. Gao, J. Liu, P. Yang, W. Lu, P. Chen, L.L. Yu 3:50 AGFD 233. Hypochoelsterolemic activity of polyphenols and essential oil of Amomum tsao-ko is mediated by increasing fecal excretion of neutral and acidic sterols. L. Lei, Y. Zhao, Z. Chen 4:15 AGFD 234. Cinnamaldehyde inhibits fatty acid uptake and increases serotonin release in Caco-2 cells via a TRP-A1 dependent pathway. J.K. Hoi, B. Lieder, J. Hans, J.P. Ley, V. Somoza 4:40 AGFD 235. Sea buckthorn seed oil is more potent in reducing plasma cholesterol than sea buckthorn fruit oil in hypercholesterolemia hamsters. W. Hao, Z. Chen

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Taste & Aroma Modulators: Chemistry, Biology & Sensory J. A. Grover, B. D. Guthrie, D. B. Josephson, L. Kreger, T. Shao, M. Sucan, Y. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 AGFD 236. When we modulate sweet taste, what else are we modulating? P.A. Breslin 1:45 AGFD 237. Unique challenges faced by efforts to reduce NaCl consumption through manipulation of salty taste perception. B. Lewandowski

2:20 AGFD 238. Cell based discovery and translation of flavor modulators in salt taste. R.E. Loy, S. Hayden, O. Dedova, D. Sawchuk, K. Shekdar 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 AGFD 239. HGT-1, a native multi-receptor cell model as an advanced tool for the identification of natural bitter taste antagonists. V. Somoza, K.I. Liszt, L. Beltran, J. Hans, J.P. Ley 3:45 AGFD 240. Discovery and function of flavors with modifying properties (FMPs) for attenuation of bitterness in consumer products, pharmaceuticals and OTCs. G. Servant 4:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

AGFD Award Symposium in honor of Dr. Sevim Erhan Cosponsored by AGRO and PROF B. D. Guthrie, M. H. Tunick, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 241. Innovative uses of vegetable oils. S.Z. Erhan 1:50 AGFD 242. Biosynthesis and applications of mirobial glycolipid biosurfactants. D. Solaiman, R.D. Ashby 2:15 AGFD 243. Hybrid vegetable oil/essential oil compounds as a new class of environmentally friendly antimicrobials. H. Ngo, K. Wagner, X. Fan, R. Moreau 2:40 AGFD 244. Plants to plastics. A. Biswas, H.N. Cheng, S.Z. Erhan, M. Appell 3:05 Intermissions. 3:20 AGFD 245. Synthetic platform for controlled delivery of 1-MCP: An effective approach to the protection of crops and produce. M.I. Sarker, L. Liu, T. Shahrin, X. Fan, P. Tomasula, C. Liu 3:45 AGFD 246. Active packaging from green polymers through intra- and inter- agencies collaborations. T. Jin, A. Sousa, X. Fan, L. Liu, K. Yam, P. Tomasula 4:10 AGFD 247. Utilizing industrial crops (pennycress, camelina, lesquerella, cuphea) as novel protein sources. M.P. Hojilla-Evangelista, R. Evangelista, G.W. Selling, M.A. Berhow 4:35 AGFD 248. Deriving value-added chemicals from Sorghum bicolor: An approach at utilizing the entire sorghum plant. R.J. Stoklosa

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109B

General Papers Nutrients, Sensory X. Fan, Organizer, Presiding H. Ma, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 249. Seasonal and geographical effect on the chemical signature of milk. L.I. Pilkington, Q. Wan, D. Barker, B. Fedrizzi 1:30 AGFD 250. Applying signal detection theory (d’) for wine sensory analysis. R. Hahn, C. Fuentes, E. Tomasino 1:55 AGFD 251. Effectiveness of Aloe vera gel based chitosan coating for maintaining physico-chemical characteristics of tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum). Z. Nasreen, M. Alom 2:20 Intermission. 2:30 AGFD 252. Tangeretin and 3’,4’,3,5,6,7,8-heptamethoxyflavone decrease insulin resistance, fat accumulation and oxidative stress in mice fed high-fat diet. J.A. Manthey, M. Nery, D. Goncalves, L.C. Spolidorio, T.B. Cesar 2:55 AGFD 253. Potential preventive and anti-diabetic effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides. J. Huang, C. Ho, S. Ou 3:20 AGFD 254. Effect of temperature and pressure on the stability of ascorbic acid in citrus fruit juices. M.C. Azih 3:45 AGFD 255. Oxidative stability studies on cashew nut (Anarcardium occidentale) oil. M.C. Azih

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals Kenneth A. Spencer Award: Symposium in Honor of Thomas M. Stevenson Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

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8:05 AGFD 206. Gelatin and pectin complex coacervates as carriers for cinnamaldehyde: Effect of pectin esterification degree on coacervate formation and enhanced thermal stability. S. Xia 8:35 AGFD 207. Structural characterization and applications of microgels assembled by food proteins and polysaccharides. W. Jin, F. Jiang 9:05 AGFD 208. Assembly of ovotransferrin and gum arabic to stabilize Pickering emulsions. Z. Wei 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 AGFD 209. Encapsulating curcumin into chitosan/ alginate bilayer nanoparticles by coaxial electrospray. Y. Ting, C. Tsai 10:20 AGFD 210. Development of different delivery systems of resveratrol with high-loading capacities and targetdelivery properties. J. Zhu, Q. Huang 10:50 AGFD 211. Whey protein isolate-low methoxyl pectin soluble complexes as delivery vehicles for quercetin. W. Wijaya, R. Harfieyanto, A. Patel, P. Van der Meeren 11:20 AGFD 212. Delivery of capsaicin using organogelbased nanoemulsions with enhanced bioaccessibility and anti-obesity effects. M. Lu, Y. Cao, C. Ho, Q. Huang

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGFD Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Chemistry & Biochemistry Cosponsored by AGRO C. Ho, D. Li, Y. Wang, Z. Zhang, Organizers X. Wan, Organizer, Presiding C. Ho, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 256. Impact of botanical diversity within Theacae species on the metabolomic profile and biomedical activity. H.J. Thompson, Y. Wang, X. Wan 8:30 AGFD 257. Caffeine and amino acids affect the bioavailability of tea polyphenols in human Caco-2 intestinal cells. D. Li, Y. Wang, Y. Zuo, F. Zu, Q. Liu, S. Deng, Z. Shen, Z. Xie 8:55 AGFD 258. Technological innovation promotes the development of tea catechins industry. S. Zhang, Z. Liu 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 AGFD 259. Functional characterization of CsNUDX1 related to geraniol formation in Camellia sinensis. S. Wei 10:00 AGFD 260. Functional verification of different tannase genes in the tea plant [Camellia sinensis]. L. Gao, X. Dai 10:20 AGFD 261. Inhibitory effects of tea polyphenols on protein advanced glycation and oxidation in the fructoseinduced protein system. T. Hsiao, Y. Wang, S. Li, M. Pan, C. Ho, C. Lo 10:40 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Food Proteins: Structure, Functionality, Bioactivity & Safety V. P. Dia, Organizer Y. Zhang, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 262. Characterization and functional properties of walnut protein isolates and Maillard reaction products with dextran. Q. Liu, Q. Huang 8:35 AGFD 263. Characterization, cloning, expression and molecular modelling of acidic cellulase from Indian buffalo rumen. S.J. Jakhesara, T. Dadheech, R. Shah, R. Pandit, A. Hinsu, A.P. Kunjadiya, D.N. Rank, C.G. Joshi 9:05 AGFD 264. C-terminal truncation decreases the metal ion dependence and improves stability of a thermophilic 1,4-α-glucan branching enzyme. Z. Li, X. Ban, C. Li, Y. Zhang, Z. Gu, L. Cheng, Y. Hong 9:35 AGFD 265. Removal of methylmercury from fish fillets using vacuum tumblers and reducing agents. S. Umasangtongkul, J.W. Ejnik 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 AGFD 266. Structure, function and epitope mapping the peanut panallergen Ara h 8. B. Hurlburt 10:50 AGFD 267. Purification and characterization of parvalbumins, the major allergens in Mustelus griseus. R. Yang, T. Jin, M. Cao 11:20 AGFD 268. Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) allergen Ber e 2 in the history of protein chemistry. Y. Zhang, F. Guo, T. Jin, A.J. Howard, H. Che, T.H. McHugh

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Taste & Aroma Modulators: Chemistry, Biology & Sensory J. A. Grover, B. D. Guthrie, D. B. Josephson, L. Kreger, T. Shao, M. Sucan, Y. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGFD 269. Discovery of new taste modifiers using the Nature-Inspired Chemical Design approach. E. Frerot, I. Cayeux

8:45 AGFD 270. Characterization of 2,5-dimethyl-2,4dihydroxy-3(2H) furanone, a flavourant principle from Sysepalum dulcificum. C. Chukwu 9:20 AGFD 271. Substituted 3-oxazolines: A novel class of Strecker aldehyde precursors in foods. M. Granvogl, P.H. Schieberle 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 AGFD 272. Discovery and biogeneration of food-born taste modulators upon fermentation. A. Dunkel, P. Christa, M. Dietz, A. Krauss, T. Hofmann 10:45 AGFD 273. Food-born acetylenic oxylipins as natural kokumi enhancers. T. Hofmann, V. Mittermeier, A. Dunkel 11:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL I. Edirisinghe, C. Lai, S. Sang, L. L. Yu, Organizers L. Liu, F. Tomas-Barberan, Organizers, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks by LinShu Liu. 8:30 AGFD 274. Agricultural basis for enhancing the benefits of the human gut microbiome. P. Starke-Reed 9:00 AGFD 275. Diet, the gut microbiome, and its metabolome in health and disease. G. Wu 9:30 AGFD 276. Fiber-fermenting gut bacteria as “foundation guild” for a health-supporting gut microbiota. L. Zhao 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 AGFD 277. Colonic fermentation exploration of gut microbial metabolism of cranberry polyphenols. T. Branck, L.A. Doherty, S. Arcidiacono, I. Pantoja-Feliciano, K. Kensil, C. Khoo, C. Chen, A. Kane, K. Racicot, J.W. Soares 10:45 AGFD 278. Polyphenol exposure, microbial metagenomics, polyphenol metabolites and their biological activity. B. Burton-Freeman 11:15 AGFD 279. Developing computational resources for mining microbiome data for antibiotic resistance posed health threat and insights from bioinformatics analyses. L. Zhang 11:45 AGFD 280. Stratification by gut microbiota metabotypes can explain differences in response to polyphenol dietary interventions. F. Tomas-Barberan, A. González-Sarrías, R. García-Villalba, M. Romo-Vaquero, D. Beltrán, V. Selma, J. Espín

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109B

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials Polysaccharide-Related Materials

Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107B

Advances in Methods & Protocols for Food Pathogen & Toxin Detection X. He, B. Park, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 288. Investigation of toxic α-dicarbonyl compounds formed from heated cooking oils. Q. Wang, M. Hengel, T. Shibamoto 1:30 AGFD 289. Engineering a click-functional T7 bacteriophage for rapid pathogen detection. H.S. Zurier, J.M. Goddard, S.R. Nugen 1:55 AGFD 290. Improvement of immunoassays for detection of Shiga toxins in human serum. X. He 2:20 AGFD 291. DOLC-NMR: Differential off-line LC-NMR analysis for the discovery of toxic metabolites in Penicillium roqueforti. R. Hammerl, O. Frank, T. Hofmann 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 AGFD 292. Phage-based biosensors for rapid testing of agricultural and process water. T.C. Hinkley, J. Talbert, S.R. Nugen 3:25 AGFD 293. Rapid detection methods for foodborne bacterial pathogens. G. Zhang 3:50 AGFD 294. Influence of pH on the thermal stability of Staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B and on the reversibility of protein refolding as measured by differential scanning calorimetry. W.H. Tolleson, O.A. Triplett 4:15 AGFD 295. Shiga toxin detection with label-free surface plasmon resonance immunosensor. B. Park, J. Chen, X. He 4:40 AGFD 296. Fluorescent [5]helicene dyes for biosensing application. T. Sooksimuang, S. Sahasithiwat, N. Karoonuthaisiri, R. Charlermroj, M. Makornwattana, S. Phuengwas, W. Panchan, L. Kangkaew 5:05 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107C

Chemistry & Health Benefits of Natural Foods & Beverages

Cosponsored by POLY M. Appell, Organizer A. Biswas, H. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding C. Osorio Roa, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 281. Enzymatic polymerization for engineered polysaccharides: A platform technology at DuPont Industrial Biosciences. R. Guan, N. Behabtu, R. DiCosimo, S.M. Hennessey, S. Kralj, C.P. Lenges, Y. Li, H.S. Lu 8:35 AGFD 282. Functionalization and derivatization of polysaccharides using ionic liquids. J. Kadokawa 9:05 AGFD 283. Microwave-assisted synthesis and characterization of sucrose polyurethane and its interpenetrating polymer networks. A. Biswas, S. Kim, V. Boddu, H.N. Cheng 9:35 AGFD 284. Sustainable raw materials - A platform for molecular design. G. John 10:05 Intermission. 10:25 AGFD 285. Rheology of cellulose ether carriers for hot melt extrusion. R.L. Sammler, T. Chatterjee, K. O’Donnell, M. Rickard, B. Nickless, Y. Li 10:55 AGFD 286. Sulfur-cellulose composite preparation and thermomechanical analysis. M.K. Lauer, T. Thiounn, A.G. Tennyson, R.C. Smith 11:25 AGFD 287. Physicochemical characterization of valueadded microencapsulates from tropical fruit by-products. J. García-Chacón, D. Giuffrida, C. Osorio Roa

Cosponsored by AGFD Y. Kim, Organizer K. G. Lee, Organizer, Presiding M. K. Kim, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGFD 297. Absorption and metabolism of apple phenolic compounds in humans. J. Lee, A.E. Mitchell 1:30 AGFD 298. Dietary intake of the whole strawberry inhibited colonic inflammation, restored immune homeostasis and alleviated gut microbiota dysbiosis in dextran sulfate sodium-treated mice. Y. Han, H. Xiao 1:55 AGFD 299. Genomics and evolution of fungal gene clusters responsible for synthesis of sphinganine-analog metabolites of concern to human health and food safety. H. Kim 2:20 Intermission. 2:35 AGFD 300. Analysis of volaile compounds in various foods using stir bar sorptive Extraction and solid-phase microextraction-arrow. H. Jang, Y. Lee, J. Lee 3:00 AGFD 301. Dietary supplementation of potato peel powders prepared from conventional and organic russet and nonorganic gold and red potatoes reduces weight gain in mice on a high-fat diet. S. Elkahoui, C. Levin, G.E. Bartley, W.H. Yokoyama, M. Friedman 3:25 AGFD 302. Enhancement of powdered protein functionality by fortifying with natural extracts. Y. Kim

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 108

Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by AGFD

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN

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Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides

SECTION C

Taste & Aroma Modulators: Chemistry, Biology & Sensory J. A. Grover, B. D. Guthrie, D. B. Josephson, L. Kreger, T. Shao, M. Sucan, Y. Wang, Organizers, Presiding

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109A

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL I. Edirisinghe, L. Liu, F. Tomas-Barberan, L. L. Yu, Organizers C. Lai, S. Sang, Organizers, Presiding 1:15 Welcome Back Remarks by Shengmin Sang. 1:20 AGFD 308. Interindividual variability in metabolism of oat avenanthramides by human gut microbiota. S. Sang 1:40 AGFD 309. Specific members of the human gut microbiome colonize wheat bran-based dietary platforms, thus driving the production of health-related microbial metabolites. P. Van den Abbeele, K. De Paepe, M. Marzorati, T. Van den Wiele 2:00 AGFD 310. Effects of dietary fiber by-product shortchain fatty acids on intestinal cell physiology and health. S. Pearce, N. Ferguson, J.P. Karl, S. Arcidiacono, J.W. Soares, K. Racicot, D. Breault 2:20 AGFD 311. Acute stressor alters inter-species competition for resistant starch in the gut microbiota. I. Pantoja Feliciano, J.W. Soares, L.A. Doherty, J.P. Karl, H.L. McClung, N.J. Armstrong, T. Branck, S. Arcidiacono 2:40 AGFD 312. Epigenetic and metabolomic signature of gene-diet interaction on metabolic diseases. C. Lai, L.D. Parnell, C. Smith, J. Ordovas 3:00 Intermission. 3:15 AGFD 313. Gypenosides improved metabolic syndrome by inducing adipose tissue remodeling and modulating gut microbiota composition in diet-induced obese mice. J. Liu, Y. Li, Z. Wang, H. Zhang, Y. Liu, J. Wang, B. Sun, L.L. Yu 3:35 AGFD 314. Chemical compositions of cold-pressed seed flours and their effects on gut microbiota and free radicals. U. Choe, Y. Li, B. Gao, L. Yu, T.T. Wang, J. Sun, P. Chen, J. Liu, L.L. Yu 3:55 AGFD 315. Metabolism of black tea thearubigins by gut microbiota. W. Wang, S. Zhang, C. Ohland, C. Jobin, S. Sang 4:15 AGFD 316. Impact of Western diet versus Mediterranean diet feeding on gut microbiome in nonhuman primates. R. Nagpal, C. Shivley, S. Appt, T. Register, H. Yadav 4:35 AGFD 317. Development of a stable gut microbiota community using in vitro methods. J. Firrman, L. Liu, P. Van den Abbeele, C. Tanes, K. Bittinger, P. Tomasula 4:55 Concluding Remarks by Liangli Yu.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 109B

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials Triglycerides & Lignin Cosponsored by POLY M. Appell, Organizer A. Biswas, H. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding C. Osorio Roa, Presiding 1:00 AGFD 318. Design of environmentally friendly and cost effective technology for production of valuable modified lipid products. H. Ngo, R. Moreau 1:30 AGFD 319. Nontoxic flame retardants from a nonedible plant oil. B.A. Howell, E.A. Ostrander 2:00 AGFD 320. Synthesis and Properties of Azidated Adenopus breviflorus benth seed oil. E.T. Akintayo 2:30 AGFD 321. Cationic polymerization of epoxidized triglycerides and their copolymers. H. Cheng, Z. Liu, A. Biswas 3:00 Intermission.

3:20 AGFD 322. Strategic assemblies of wood-derived building blocks for the advancement of bio-based polymers and composites. J.F. Stanzione 3:50 AGFD 323. Polymer-grafted lignin dispersants: Applications in cement and agrochemicals. N. Washburn, K.M. Perkins, C. Childs 4:20 AGFD 324. Next generation bisphenols derived from lignin and cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL): Application in thermosetting resins. A.W. Bassett, C.M. Breyta, A.E. Honnig, J.H. Reilly, K.R. Sweet, J. La Scala, J.F. Stanzione

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production Sponsored by CHAS, Cosponsored by AGFD

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR‡ and ORGN

Chemistry & Health Benefits of Natural Foods & Beverages Cosponsored by AGFD

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR‡ and ORGN

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in honor of George P. Lahm Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252A

General Papers Detection Methods X. Fan, Organizer, Presiding H. Ma, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 325. Fast and sensitive determination of lactose in low-lactose dairy products using HPAE-PAD/MS. M. Aggrawal, J. Rohrer

8:30 AGFD 326. Coffee aroma profiling with GC, GCxGC, and TOFMS. D. Alonso, E. Humston-Fulmer, J. Binkley, M.F. Merrick 8:55 AGFD 327. Quantum molecular dynamics and cheminformatics study of mycotoxin toxicity and detection to improve food safety. Y. Tu, Y. Tseng, M. Appell 9:20 Intermission. 9:30 AGFD 328. Determination of barbiturate drug residue levels in pet foods to ensure the safety of the foods we provide to our pets. J.P. McCauley 9:55 AGFD 329. FT-IR spectrophotometric screening of adulterants in honey. D.L. Sparks, C. Russell, D. Nakamura, S. Boone, A. Meredith, A.E. Brown 10:20 AGFD 330. Direct determination of cationic polar pesticides in baby food using ion chromatography and MS/MS or high resolution accurate mass spectrometry. T.T. Christison, J.E. Madden, J. Rohrer, J. Beck

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Chemistry & Health Benefits of Natural Foods & Beverages Cosponsored by AGFD K. G. Lee, Organizer Y. Kim, Organizer, Presiding H. Jang, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 331. Anti-obesity effects of green coffee bean and green tea in Caenorhabditis elegans. Y. Park, R. FariasPereira, Y. Peng, J. Liu, Y. Yue, P. Shen 8:30 AGFD 332. Effects of highland barley bran extract on the formation of Nɛ-carboxymethyllysine in biscuit samples. H. Liu, D. Zhang, J. Wang 8:55 AGFD 333. Analysis and formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in Maillard reaction model systems and various alcoholic beverages. K.G. Lee 9:20 Intermission. 9:35 AGFD 334. Combinatorial optimization of natural components to enhance the physiological efficacy and reduce the hepatotoxicity. H. Chun 10:00 AGFD 335. Identification of key flavor compounds responsible for mulberry fruits dried in different temperatures using integrated flavor analysis techniques. M.K. Kim 10:25 AGFD 336. Chemical profiling and pharmacological potentials of the stem and fruit peel crude extracts of Citrus jambhiri grown in Nigeria. O.E. Ogunjinmi

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 253A

CRISPR Cosponsored by BIOL R. S. Tiwari, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 AGFD 337. CRISPR for biomedical application. J. Collins 8:40 AGFD 338. From CRISPR biology to technologies. C. Beisel, S. Collins 9:15 AGFD 339. Genome-scale activation screen identifies a lncRNA locus regulating a gene neighbourhood. J. Joung, J. Engreitz, E. Lander, F. Zhang 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 AGFD 340. Ensuring the food safety of the products of modern biotechnology: Applying FDA’s 1992 policy on food derived from new plant varieties from genetically engineered plant foods to developing technologies. R. Merker 10:40 AGFD 341. Oversight of plants produced using plant breeding innovations at USDA. J. Turner 11:15 AGFD 342. Precision gene editing in agriculture. G. Gocal, C. Schöpke, M. Knuth, D. Songstad, S. Sanders, N. Sauer, P. Beetham

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 253B

Value-Added Derivatives from Agro-Based Raw Materials New or Improved Biobased Materials or Bioprocesses Cosponsored by POLY M. Appell, Organizer A. Biswas, H. Cheng, Organizers, Presiding C. Osorio Roa, Presiding

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1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 AGFD 303. Measurement of multimodal taste modulation over time. A. Feldmeyer 1:45 AGFD 304. Differentiation between flavors of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and mandarin (Citrus reticulata). S. Feng, F. Gmitter, Y. Wang 2:20 AGFD 305. Enjoyment in over the counter medications. K.D. Deibler 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 AGFD 306. Impact of bitter tastants on volatile flavor perception of coffee. A. Soldavini, S. Kokkinidou, J. Peterson, O. Auell, C.T. Simons, D.G. Peterson 3:45 AGFD 307. Flavor influences diet, but diet may also influence saliva, which in turn may influence flavor. C.A. Running 4:20 Concluding Remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGFD/AGRO 8:00 AGFD 343. Nomilin nanoparticles enhances the inhibition of α-amylase and angiotensin-converting-enzyme. G.K. Jayaprakasha, B. Patil, H. Shanmugam, P. Acharya 8:30 AGFD 344. High throughput electrospinning for the design of functional surfaces, nanocomposites and barrier structures made of biopolymers. J. Lagaron, S. Torres-Giner, C. Prieto, L. Cabedo, A. Cherpinski, B. Melendez, K. Figueroa 9:00 AGFD 345. Fat for the future: Designing multifunctional molecular oleogels. G. John, M. Samateh, S. Sagirii 9:30 Intermission. 9:50 AGFD 346. Value-added products from whey. M.H. Tunick 10:20 AGFD 347. Extraction and utilisation of bioactive monomeric phenolics and commercially valuable flavour precursors from grape waste. D. Barker, R. Jelley, L.I. Pilkington, B. Fedrizzi 10:50 AGFD 348. Tunable permeation of bio-based and biodegradable polyesters for agricultural applications. S. Bi, M.J. Sobkowicz 11:20 Concluding Remarks.

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Challenges of Utilizing Higher-Tier Ecotoxicity Data in Risk Assessment & Risk Management of Pesticides Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ENVR

Chemistry & Health Benefits of Natural Foods & Beverages Cosponsored by AGFD

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Legal Aspects of Agriculture, Agrochemicals & Agribusiness Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and PROF

AGRO

Division of Agrochemicals J. Eble, Program Chair OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production (see CHAS, Mon, Wed) Chemical Toxicology of Nanomaterials (see TOXI, Mon) Advances in Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs: Impact on the Future of the Food & Drug & Agrochemical Industry (see BGMT, Wed) The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law (see CHAL, Wed) Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems (see CATL, Weds, Thu) SOCIAL EVENTS: Graduate Student Lunch, 11:45 AM: Mon Blues & Brews, 6:00 PM: Tue Awards Social, 6:00 PM: Wed BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting, 5:00 PM: Sun EVENTS: Vendors’ Session, 5:00 PM: Tue “Your AGRO” Mixer, 12:15 PM: Thu

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

INSecticide TARgets (INSTAR) Summit New Targets & Chemistry T. Anderson, J. R. Bloomquist, T. C. Sparks, D. Swale, K. Y. Zhu, Organizers J. M. Clark, Organizer, Presiding K. D. Wing, Presiding 8:20 Introductory Remarks. 8:25 AGRO 1. Introduction, past, present and future of INSTAR summits. J.R. Bloomquist

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8:45 AGRO 2. Current status of new insecticide chemistry, targets, mode of action and the future. T.C. Sparks, B.A. Lorsbach, G.B. Watson, F. Wessels 9:10 AGRO 3. Perspectives on the identification and development of new insecticide targets. D. Swale 9:35 AGRO 4. Navigating the global regulatory landscape for crop protection products: Lessons learning and opportunities for the future. R. Rasoulpour 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 Panel Discussion. 12:00 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Cosponsored by AGFD H. B. Irrig, C. Tiu, Organizers P. A. Brindle, Organizer, Presiding 8:15 Introductory Remarks. 8:20 AGRO 5. Pesticide regulation and trade: National and international considerations. J.E. Callahan 8:45 AGRO 6. Government of Canada initiatives for MRL alignment. P. Chan 9:10 AGRO 7. Global outlook on MRL harmonization: U.S. trade and international capacity building. A. Gore 9:35 AGRO 8. Challenges Pacific Northwest tree fruit producers have meeting MRL requirements when exporting fruit around the world. B. Madden 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 AGRO 9. Import pesticide tolerance pilot project. M. Doherty, D. Davis 10:45 AGRO 10. Progress on global crop grouping for extrapolation of pesticide residue studies and outcomes from the third Global Minor Use Summit. D. Kunkel, W. Barney, J. Baron 11:10 AGRO 11. Establishing Import MRLs: South Korea and Taiwan. L.A. Rossi 11:35 AGRO 12. Import MRLs in Japan: Snapshot of the positive list sytem. A. Aoki 12:00 Panel Discussion.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Environmental Fate, Transport & Modeling of Agriculturally-Related Chemicals S. H. Jackson, R. L. Warren, Organizers, Presiding 8:40 Introductory Remarks. 8:45 AGRO 13. Extractability of adsorbed organic chemicals using cations. D. Riggs 9:10 AGRO 14. What is extractability? Are non-extractable residues in our food supply? P. Reibach 9:35 AGRO 15. Benzobicyclon hydrolysate sorption coefficients in soils used for rice production. C.D. Willett, M.G. Sena, E.M. Grantz, K.R. Brye 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 AGRO 16. Environmental fate and impact assessment of thiobencarb application in California rice fields using RICEWQ. R. Wang, Y. Luo, H. Chen, Y. Yuan, R. Bingner, A. Pitchford, D. Denton, M.A. Locke, M. Zhang 10:45 AGRO 17. Accurately evaluating the photolytic fate of agrochemicals in natural waters. J. Apell, K.P. McNeill 11:10 AGRO 18. Transformation products of 2,4-D sunlight photolysis in simulated leaf surface systems. L. Su, N. Dai, J.D. Sivey 11:35 AGRO 19. Web-based access to experimental and predicted data for environmental fate, transport and toxicity data. A.J. Williams, T. Martin, V. Tkachenko, K. Mansouri, C. Grulke 12:00 Concluding Remarks.

8:20 AGRO 20. Framework for tiered endangered species assessments. S. Teed, K. Henry, S. Mortensen, L. Ortego, M. Winchell, T. Hall, N.J. Snyder, M. Dobbs, N. Peranginangin, J. Collins 8:45 AGRO 21. Estimation of annual agricultural pesticide use. W.W. Stone 9:10 AGRO 22. Incorporating usage data to identify areas where pesticide exposure to listed species is most likely to occur. K. Garber, J. Connolly, S. Lennartz, M. Panger, C. Peck, C. Rossmeisl, W.P. Eckel, B. Anderson 9:35 AGRO 23. FESTF Gopher: Improving data management, accessibility, and use. A. Frank, B. McGaughey, T. Hall, L. Ghebremichael 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 AGRO 24. Tools for evaluating indirect effects of pesticides for informed management decisions. S. McGee, T. Hall, M. Dobbs, M. McCoole 10:45 AGRO 25. Weight-of-evidence pesticide assessments for threatened and endangered species to inform management decisions. D. Moore 11:10 AGRO 26. Voluntary conservation: Benefit and cost considerations for stewardship programs. L. Duzy, B. McGaughey 11:35 AGRO 27. Creating environmentally resilient agriculture landscapes using precision agriculture technology: An economic perspective. M.D. McConnell 12:00 Discussion. 12:10 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

How Can Advances in Chemistry Improve Human Health Exposure Assessment? Cosponsored by ENVR P. Price, C. Terry, Organizers, Presiding 9:05 Introductory Remarks. 9:10 AGRO 28. Using publicly available data and quantitative models of uncertainty to characterize composition of consumer products in a simulation model of chemical exposure. P. Price, K. Dionisio, K. Isaacs, K. Phillips 9:35 AGRO 29. Leveraging chemistry data to improve exposure analyses using the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard. A. McEachran, K. Phillips, K. Isaacs, S. Newton, J. Sobus, C. Grulke, A.J. Williams 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 AGRO 30. Spatial and temporal modeling of potential residential bystander exposures associated with the use of agricultural chemicals. J. Yan, J.H. Driver, I. van Wesenbeeck 10:45 AGRO 31. Integrating pharmaco*kinetic considerations with dose-response data to support risk-based chemical safety assessment. C. Tan, J. Leonard 11:10 AGRO 32. Building a more relevant bridge: Interspecies extrapolation based on real-world exposure conditions. C. Fleming, P.L. Havens 11:35 Discussion. 11:50 Concluding Remarks.

Functional Foods Their Novel Biofunctions & Underlying Mechanisms Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO and I&EC

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management Cosponsored by AGRO

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency

SECTION D

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO, ENFL and I&EC

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management Cosponsored by AGRO P. Ashfield, M. Dobbs, G. Hall, L. Honey, B. McGaughey, C. Tortorici, Organizers D. D. Campbell, Organizer, Presiding B. Anderson, Presiding 8:15 Introductory Remarks.

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

INSecticide TARgets (INSTAR) Summit Resistance Management T. Anderson, J. R. Bloomquist, J. M. Clark, T. C. Sparks, D. Swale, Organizers K. Y. Zhu, Organizer, Presiding W. Moar, Presiding

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Cosponsored by AGFD P. A. Brindle, C. Tiu, Organizers H. B. Irrig, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 37. Uncertainties maximum residue levels create for the global movement of grains and oilseeds. G. Flanley 1:30 AGRO 38. Effect of the hazard-based cut-off criteria on agriculture exports to the European Union. M. Lantz, K. Berry 1:55 AGRO 39. New tools for finding potential solutions for differential MRLs and for growers’ needs in the area of pests and diseases. F. Schuster 2:20 AGRO 40. Pesticides residue regulations governing U.S. commodity imports. N. Mitchell, M. Basu 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 41. IESTI update: How a review of dietary exposure methodologies can best support global MRLs. C.B. Cleveland 3:30 AGRO 42. Benchmarking proposed changes to the international estimated short-term intake (IESTI) model for acute exposure to pesticides. C. Fleming 3:55 AGRO 43. APEC tools for import maximum residue limits (MRLs). R. McAllister, C. Tiu, P.A. Brindle 4:20 AGRO 44. Postharvest fumigants: Global MRL progress & challenges. S.S. Walse 4:45 Panel Discussion.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Environmental Fate, Transport & Modeling of Agriculturally-Related Chemicals S. H. Jackson, R. L. Warren, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 45. Preliminary assessment of residual herbicide concentrations in tailwater recovery systems. E. Grantz, C.D. Willett, M. Reba, D. Milholen, D. Leslie 1:30 AGRO 46. Off-site transport of pesticides with runoff from golf course fairway turf: An evaluation of creeping bentgrass versus a fine fescue mixture. P.J. Rice, B.P. Horgan, J.L. Hamlin 1:55 AGRO 47. How can risk management practices be considered in regulatory risk assessments: Reducing pesticide transport via surface run-off and soil erosion? S. Sittig, D. Baets, R. Sur 2:20 AGRO 48. Summer fertigation of dairy slurry reduces subsurface drainage nitrate losses compared to fall injection. J.D. Gamble, G.W. Feyereisen, S.K. Papiernik, C.D. Wente, J.M. Baker 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 49. Soil carryover residue modeling to support safe product use to rotational crops. N. Peranginangin, D. Porter, G. Vail, D. Cheryl, D. Mao 3:30 AGRO 50. Refined land cover for improving the confidence of pesticide risk assessments. D. Perkins, J. Amos 3:55 AGRO 51. Ecoregion similarities of field trials– Comparison of field degradation data of some pesticides from New Zealand, Chile and Europe. B. Gottesburen, H. Bayer, K. Platz, F. Donaldson, J. Goulet Fortin 4:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management

Cosponsored by AGRO P. Ashfield, D. D. Campbell, G. Hall, L. Honey, C. Tortorici, Organizers M. Dobbs, B. McGaughey, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 52. Proactive conservation facilitated through section 7(a)(1) of the Endangered Species Act. P. Ashfield, K. Bissell 1:30 AGRO 53. Leveraging national compensatory mitigation conservation offset strategies to pro-actively address endangered species section 7 authorized take of residual, unavoidable impacts permitted within national scale pesticide biological opinions. W. White, J. Bickel, N.J. Snyder, M. Kern 1:55 AGRO 54. Addressing agricultural pollutants in the Little Arkansas River using best management practices. R.W. Graber 2:20 AGRO 55. Wisconsin “Healthy Grown” Program: Research, innovation and implementation of high-bar, wholefarm production systems with certification for potatoes, carrots and onions. J. Barzen, D. Knuteson 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 56. Providing habitat for pollinators and the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) using in-field and edge of field conservation practices. S. Bradbury 3:30 AGRO 57. Rusty-patched bumble bee habitat restoration in Northeast Iowa: Meeting multiple conservation objectives in a working landscape. L.L. Richardson, D.D. Campbell, B. Sacher, C. Savinelli, J.P. Hanzas, P. Berthelsen, S. Appelgate, S.P. Bradbury 3:55 AGRO 58. Evaluation of applied, cross-sector vegetative best management practices in rights-of-way on pollinators. F. Abi-Akar, D. Perkins, J. Amos, A. Schmolke, S. Vera-Art, I. Caldwell 4:20 AGRO 59. Discussion session: Reflection on the day’s information. B. McGaughey 4:45 Discussion. 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

Cosponsored by AGRO

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments Cosponsored by CHAS and TOXI A. Clippinger, S. Papineni, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 60. Multi-stakeholder collaborations to advance non-animal approaches for testing agrochemical formulations. A. Clippinger 1:30 AGRO 61. Predictive toxicological approaches: Development, challenges, and applications. J.R. Damewood 1:55 AGRO 62. How a problem formulation process helped refine inhalation risk assessment for plant protection products. T.S. Ramanarayanan, D.C. Wolf, P. Hinderliter, S. Flack, B. Parr-Dobrzanski, A. Charlton, S. Pyles 2:20 AGRO 63. Using high-throughput pharmaco*kinetic simulation and in silico property estimates to anticipate mammalian toxicity. R.D. Clark, M.S. Lawless, P.R. Daga 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 64. Integration of toxico*kinetics in agrochemical toxicity testing. S. Papineni 3:30 AGRO 65. Regulatory perspective: Human health risk assessment for pest control products and reduction in animal use. P. Chan 3:55 AGRO 66. Inadvertent residues: Food handling uses & emerging regulations. C. Tiu 4:20 AGRO 67. In vitro studies with human intestinal epithelial cell line monolayers for protein hazard characterization. B. Delaney 4:45 Discussion. 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

Functional Foods Their Novel Biofunctions & Underlying Mechanisms Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO and I&EC

Chemistry of Struvite & Slow Release Fertilizers: From Fundamentals of Crystal Growth to Engineered Nutrient Recovery & Their Release Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO, ENFL and I&EC

SUNDAY EVENING Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL T. Gaines, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:15 AGRO 68. My 33 years trying to understand P450 endowed herbicide resistance in multi-resistant Lolium. S. Powles 9:05 AGRO 69. The evolution and management of nontarget site resistance. P. Neve 9:30 AGRO 70. Fighting weed resistance - how Steve Powles helped us get innovation back on track. M. Busch 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 AGRO 71. Role of xenobiotic detoxification in nontarget site herbicide resistance in weeds. N. Onkokesung, A. Goldberg Cavalleri, C. Tetard-Jones, M. Brazier-Hicks, R. Edwards 10:40 AGRO 72. What roles for metabolism-based resistance to pre-emergent herbicides in Lolium rigidum. D. Brunton, B. Fleet, P. Boutsalis, J. Malone, C. Preston 11:05 AGRO 73. Genomics to characterize Cyt P450 function in herbicide metabolic resistance: A review of recent works. R.S. Beffa 11:30 AGRO 74. Differences in P450-mediated metabolic resistance mechanisms to triketone and pyrazole HPPD-inhibiting herbicides in Amaranthus tuberculatus. D.E. Riechers, A.V. Lygin, J. Morris, E. McIndoe, S.S. Kaundun 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR Financially supported by Stone Environmental, Inc. J. W. Perine, H. Thistle, Organizers, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 AGRO 75. Measuring spray drift from aerial application using horizontal and vertical collectors in a field experiment. U. Antuniassi, R.G. Chechetto, J.A. Cunha, A.A. Mota, F.K. Carvalho 9:30 AGRO 76. Estimating appropriate buffer distances to mitigate environmental risk of spray drift using field data and computer automation. S. Castro-Tanzi, L. Padilla, J.M. Brausch, M. Winchell, J.P. Hanzas 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 AGRO 77. Using AGDISP to assess bystander exposure to pesticide spray drift: A California example. W. Jiang, T.A. Barry 10:40 AGRO 78. Influence of operational and environmental conditions on spray deposition, uniformity and transport with remotely-piloted aerial spray systems (RASS). J. Bonds, X. He, C. Wang, A. Herbst 11:05 AGRO 79. Computational fluid dynamics modelling for plant canopy interception of pesticide spray droplets. L. Padilla, S. Grant, J. Dunne, J.W. Perine, M. Ledson

81

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 33. Current status of insecticide resistance in insect vectors. H.V. Pates Jamet 1:30 AGRO 34. One health approach to resistance management. T.D. Anderson 1:55 AGRO 35. Insecticide resistance and management of malaria vectors. M.J. Paine 2:20 AGRO 36. Changes in neuronal signaling and cell stress response pathways are associated with a multigenic response of Drosophila melanogaster to DDT selection. K. Seong, B. Coates, W. Sun, J.M. Clark, B. Pittendrigh 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 Panel Discussion. 4:35 Concluding Remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO 11:30 AGRO 80. Relative importance of droplet drift versus vapor drift in terms of deposition. D.A. Sullivan, D. Hlinka, R.D. Sullivan 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR K. Lynn, K. Myung, M. Zhang, Organizers X. Zhou, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 AGRO 81. Early phase metabolism studies to identify compounds that could be toxic to bees. P. Cassidy 9:30 AGRO 82. Approaches of leveraging In Vitro metabolism assays to support animal nature of residue studies and safety assessment of agrochemicals. X. Zhou, M. Ma, Y.A. Adelfinskaya, A. Brown, T.K. Trullinger, L. Buchholz 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 AGRO 83. In-vitro biotransformation of an avicide. D.A. Goldade 10:40 AGRO 84. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and enzymatic activity of the endophenazines and analogues. M. Conda-Sheridan, V.R. Udumula, K. Maddeboina, N. Rodrigues de Almeida, J. Jiang, L. Du 11:05 AGRO 85. Stability and biological activities of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in open water bodies: Roles of environmental factors. G. Rubasinghege, R. Gurung, H.N. Rijal, S. Maldonado-Torres, A. Chan, S. Rogelj, M.E. Piyasena 11:30 AGRO 86. Machine learning models for the prediction of xeniobiotic metabolism. C. de Bruyn Kops, M. Šícho, W. Plonka, A. Mazzolari, N. Kochev, N. Jeliazkova, A. Pedretti, D. Svozil, B. Testa, G. Vistoli, J. Kirchmair 11:55 AGRO 87. Structure-stability relationships of tetrahydroisoquinoline-containing CXCR4 antagonists and lipid prodrugs of tenofovir in liver microsomes. E.J. Miller, N. Pribut, M. D’Erasmo, B. Iskandar, M. Kim, K. Giesler, J. Marengo, R. Wilson, Y. Tahirovic, E. Jecs, H. Nguyen, L. Wilson, D. Liotta 12:20 Concluding Remarks.

9:30 AGRO 95. New catalytic reactions for agroscience. J.F. Hartwig 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 AGRO 96. Process route scouting of X087, a picolinamide fungicide. F. Li, N. Choy, K. Bravo, G.T. Whiteker 10:40 AGRO 97. Development of fluorination reactions: Collaboration between the University of Michigan and The Dow Chemical Company. M. Cismesia, S.D. Schimler, D.C. Bland, M.S. Sanford 11:05 AGRO 98. A novel enzymatic process to produce active L-glufosinate from inactive D-glufosinate. B. Green, M. Oberholzer, S. Fields 11:30 Discussion. 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Chemistry Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Applied Nanotechnology for Food & Agriculture Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and CEI

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO, ENFL and I&EC

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

SECTION A

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines to Fulfill Regulatory Needs

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles

Cosponsored by CHAS and ENVR A. M. Ritter, Z. Tang, Organizers, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 AGRO 88. Kinetic evaluation of environmental fate studies. Z. Tang, D.G. Dyer, C. Hassinger 9:30 AGRO 89. Modeling chemical partitioning at the water-sediment interface. W.M. Williams, A.M. Ritter 9:55 Intermission. 10:15 AGRO 90. Analysis of spatial data to reduce the uncertainty of pesticide spray drift contributions to aquatic exposure at the watershed scale. M. Winchell, H. Rathjens, P. Whatling 10:40 AGRO 91. Pesticides in flooded applications model (PFAM) ecological modeling sensitivity and the impact of a receiving water body on ecological estimated environmental concentrations. A.M. Ritter, W.M. Williams 11:05 AGRO 92. Assessing the impact of distributional analysis in drinking water exposure assessments. A.Z. Szarka, S. Grant, M. Grunenwald, T.S. Ramanarayanan 11:30 AGRO 93. Probabilistic dietary assessment technique for refining combined milk residues resulting from livestock dietary burden sources with milk residues resulting from insecticide-impregnated ear tags to mitigate potential acute dietary exposures. M. Grunenwald, A.Z. Szarka, M. Fletcher 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E

SECTION B

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Process Research & Development in Crop Protection

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Reducing Uncertainty in Modeling the Environmental & Human Health Exposure to Agrochemicals

Q. Yang, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 AGRO 94. Evaluation of potential safety hazards associated with the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of aryl bromides with vinylboron species. Q. Yang, B. Canturk, K. Gray, E. McCusker, M. Sheng, F. Li

82

SECTION C

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL T. Gaines, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 99. Metabolic degradation of glyphosate and glyphosate tolerance and resistance. S.O. Duke 1:30 AGRO 100. Gene expression hotspots in herbicideresistant waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus). P. Tranel, D. Giacomini, T. Gaines, R.S. Beffa 1:55 AGRO 101. Mechanism of multiple-herbicide resistance in Echinochloa phyllopogon. S. Iwakami 2:20 AGRO 102. Multiple herbicide resistance in Iowa waterhemp is the norm: Implications of multiple resistances on fitness, resistance mechanisms and future management. M.D. Owen, E. Jones, D. Kohlhase 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 103. Identification of genes involved in metabolism-based tembotrione resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri). A. Kuepper, D. Giacomini, P. Tranel, R.S. Beffa, T. Gaines 3:30 AGRO 104. 2,4-D metabolic resistance occurs via a P450-mediated hydroxylation reaction in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus). M.R. Figueiredo, F. Dayan, P. Tranel, S. Nissen, P. Westra, M. Bernards, G. Kruger, M. Jugulam, T. Gaines 3:55 AGRO 105. Cytochrome P450s and multiple resistance in Amaranthus palmeri and Echinochloa colona. N. Burgos, C. Rouse, R.A. Salas-Perez, R. Noorai, A. Lawton-Rauh, L. Fan, J. Qiu, C. Saski 4:20 AGRO 106. Pyroxasulfone resistance mediated by enhanced metabolism in Lolium rigidum. T. Gaines, R. Busi, A. Porri, S. Powles 4:45 Discussion.

SECTION D

1:05 AGRO 107. Consensus ranking and fragmentation prediction for identification of unknowns in high resolution mass spectrometry. A. McEachran, H. Al-Ghoul, I.A. Balabin, T. Cathey, J. Sobus, A.J. Williams 1:30 AGRO 108. Analysis of anionic phosphorus species and isotope dilution measurement of phosphate in surface water samples. V.I. Furdui, V. Packa, N. Diep, T. Howell, V. Bostan, S. Maedler, R.J. Tooley 1:55 AGRO 109. High resolution mass spectrometry applications in the identification of polar environmental metabolites to support development of new agricultural products. Y. Adelfinskaya, J.R. Gilbert, J. Balcer, J.A. Godbey, J.A. Taylor 2:20 AGRO 110. Targeted and untargeted metabolomics to resolve bitter off-taste challenges in carrots (Daucus carota L.). C. Dawid, S. Baur, A. Dunkel, T. Nothnagel, D. Ulrich, F. Dunemann, B. Singldinger, T. Hofmann 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 111. Comprehensive pesticide analysis by SWATH® and MRM-HR acquisition using the SCIEX X500R QTOF high resolution accurate mass spectrometer. C. Butt, R. Di Lorenzo, C. Borton 3:30 AGRO 112. Method development for analysis of picloram in compost. K. Kuppannan, S. Ring, J. Walter, K. Smith, Y. Ding, M. Hastings 3:55 AGRO 113. Use of modern MS techniques and informatics to support agricultural research and a pragmatic approach to contaminant screening. G. Cleland 4:20 AGRO 114. Combining sample clean-up techniques and high resolution LC-MS, with software manipulation, for metabolite identification in support of agrochemical product development. J. O’Neill 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR J. Ferguson, Organizer J. Balcer, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks.

Cosponsored by ENVR H. Adusumilli, A. Chen, X. Huang, K. Malekani, E. Nfon, Q. Yao, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 115. Challenges and approaches on the conduct of aqueous photolysis studies: Case study for a low solubility compound producing volatile organics and polar unknown degradates. M. Chandrashekhar, M. Ponte 1:30 AGRO 116. Study design and conduct of surface water mineralization in either dark or diffuse light with optional inclusion of sediment. R. Lomax, M. Ponte 1:55 AGRO 117. Designing experiments to support USDA National Conservation Practice Standards and air quality guidelines. Q. Yao, H. Li, M.D. Buser, J.G. Alfieri, Z. Yang, J.D. Wanjura, P.M. Downey, C. Zhang, C. Craige, A. Torrents, L.L. McConnell, G.A. Holt, C.J. Hapeman 2:20 AGRO 118. Describing aged sorption behavior of pesticide in soil field dissipation studies via inverse modeling. X. Huang 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 119. Guideline adsorption/desorption study design and approaches to adsorption coefficient determination. T. Siyoum 3:30 AGRO 120. Enhanced laboratory techniques for the evaluation of persistence. S.P. McLaughlin 3:55 AGRO 121. Transformation of organic chemicals in aquatic sediment systems (OECD 308) under simulated natural sunlight. C. Wijntjes, D. Adam, W. Völkel, S. Höger 4:20 AGRO 122. Understanding the behavior of herbicide residues in composts with small scale composting and bioassay tests. Y. Ding, D.E. Barnekow, T. Jones-Jefferson, J. McFadden, K. Kuppannan, I. van Wesenbeeck, T.K. Trullinger, A. Latham, L. Buchholz 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Vector-Borne Diseases: Role of Chemistry in Managing Risks to Humans, Domestics Animals, Aquaculture & Wildlife A. D. Gross, D. Swale, W. M. Williams, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 123. Mode of action of insecticides and repellents. V.L. Salgado 1:55 AGRO 124. Vapor phase repellents: New methods, chemistry, and mechanisms of action. L. Yang, Y. Liu, U.R. Bernier, M. Tsikolia, K. Linthicum, J.R. Bloomquist

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Process Research & Development in Crop Protection Q. Yang, Organizer, Presiding 1:25 Introductory Remarks. 1:30 AGRO 130. Commercialization of natural products from discovery via microbial fermentation processes. P. Maddipati, C. Stowers, M.R. Mikola 1:55 AGRO 131. Use of green chemistry principles in the design of crop protection processes and products. G.T. Whiteker 2:20 AGRO 132. Selective liquid phase hydrogenation of p-hydroxybenzyl cyanide over a supported Pd catalyst. M. McAllister, C. Boulho, C. Brennan, D. Lennon 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 133. Simple and highly effective mono-ligated arylpalladacycle complexes for Suzuki cross coupling reactions. C. Zhang, S. Tu, K. Ogawa, J. Ringer, C. Derstine, C. Zu 3:30 AGRO 134. Development of scalable Sn-catalyzed regioselective allylation of 1-methyl-L-α-rhamnopyranoside. X. Li, Q. Yang, C. Deamicis 3:55 Discussion. 4:20 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Bioactivity Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Get Published: Panel Discussion with JAFC Editors Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and CEI

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix J. E. Eble, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 274-278, 282-284, 286-289, 293, 297, 299, 304, 306, 308312, 317, 320-323, 330-332, 345-346, 350-351, 355-360. See subsequent listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in honor of George P. Lahm Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN S. Tyagi, Organizer T. M. Stevenson, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 135. Synthetic studies toward ryanodol, ryanodine, and related insecticidal natural products. S.E. Reisman 9:00 AGRO 136. Award Address (ACS Award in Industrial Chemistry sponsored by the ACS Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry). Strategies in the discovery of new insecticides and nematicides: A career perspective. G.P. Lahm 9:50 Intermission.

10:10 AGRO 137. Discovery and development of Simparica® (Sarolaner): A novel companion animal isoxazoline parasiticide. D. Billen 10:35 AGRO 138. Optimization of mesoionic pyrido[1,2-a] pyrimidinone insecticide and discovery of dicloromezotiaz. W. Zhang, C.W. Holyoke, K.A. Hughes, M. Tong 11:00 AGRO 139. Novel insecticidal bifenazate derivatives. W. von Deyn, B. Wedel 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Cosponsored by AGFD J. J. Beck, C. C. Rering, Organizers S. O. Duke, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 140. Fungal and plant phytotoxins as tool for legume crops protection. A. Cimmino, M. Masi, D. Rubiales, M. Vurro, A. Evidente 8:35 AGRO 141. Antibacterial metabolites from Alternaria alternate ZHJG5, an endophytic fungus in Cercis chinensis. S. Zhao, L. Cao, W. Yan, Y. Ye 9:00 AGRO 142. Role of a multiactive bio-organic substance on protection and yield of rice crop. S. Pathare, M. Bapat 9:25 AGRO 143. A new furanocoumarin from leaves of Amyris elemifera with antifungal and phytotoxic activities. A.K. Bracken, K.M. Meepagala, D.E. Wedge, S.O. Duke 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 144. Mode of action of spliceostatin C, a potent herbicidal compound from a microbe. S.O. Duke, L.G. Boddy, Z. Pan, J. Bajsa-Hirschel 10:35 AGRO 145. Mosquitocidal constituents from plant pathogenic fungi. K.M. Meepagala, A.S. Estep, J.J. Becnel 11:00 AGRO 146. Discovery and development of phytochemical phytotoxins for weed management. C.L. Cantrell, S.O. Duke 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Vector-Borne Diseases: Role of Chemistry in Managing Risks to Humans, Domestics Animals, Aquaculture & Wildlife A. D. Gross, D. Swale, W. M. Williams, Organizers, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 147. Use of acaricides for integrated management of the black-legged tick: Current science and new opportunities. A. Li 8:35 AGRO 148. Inward Rectifier Potassium (Kir) Channels: An emerging target for the control of tick populations and tick-vectored pathogens. D. Swale 9:00 AGRO 149. Genomics and reverse vaccinology research for the integrated use of anti-tick vaccines to manage ticks and tick-borne diseases. A.A. Pérez de León, F.D. Guerrero, R.J. Miller 9:25 AGRO 150. Evolution of insecticide resistance is unpredictable: Lessons learned from the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. D. Duneau, H. Sun, P. Messer, N. Buchon, J.G. Scott 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 151. Transcript expression changes of cytochrome P450 and ABC transporters in Aedes aegypti due to age, sex, and pyrethroid-resistance status. L. Rault, S. O’Neal, E. Johnson, T. Anderson 10:35 AGRO 152. Overcoming insecticide resistance: Inhibiting ABC transporters as a means to increase insecticide efficacy. T.D. Anderson 11:00 AGRO 153. Characterizing permethrin and etofenprox resistance in two laboratory strains of Anopheles gambiae. A.D. Gross, J.R. Bloomquist 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects Cosponsored by AGFD Financially supported by Corteva Agriscience, CropLife America, Syngenta, Bayer CropScience, ISK Biosciences, BASF L. Rossi, Organizer R. de Moraes, K. D. Racke, Organizers, Presiding

8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 154. Joint reviews of new pesticide active ingredients: A historical perspective. L.A. Rossi 8:35 AGRO 155. Trends in agrochemical product introduction. M. Phillips, J. McDougall 9:00 AGRO 156. Industry 10-year retrospective view of joint reviews (2008-2017) for conventional active ingredients. J. Abbott, R. McAllister, C. DeMarco 9:25 AGRO 157. Flupyradifurone (SiVanto): A registrant’s experience with benefits for MRL harmonization through pesticide global joint review. C. Sanson, J. Huang 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 158. Global joint reviews: An Isoclast (sulfoxaflor) and Zorvec (oxathiapiprolin) perspective. T. Carski, N. Simmons 10:35 AGRO 159. Global joint reviews: BASF success stories and key benefits. M. Safarpour, J. Murray, T. Mahl 11:00 AGRO 160. Recent experience of a registrant with joint review of new agrochemicals. M.F. Leggett 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) Bio-Accessibility & Potential Risks Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR M. Kastner, M. Telscher, Organizers M. Zhang, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 161. Classification and modelling of nonextractable residues (NER) formation from pesticides in soil. M. Kaestner, K. Nowak, A. Brock, M. Anja, A. Schaeffer, S. Trapp 8:35 AGRO 162. Formation and stability of non-extractable residues (NER) of phenolic emerging pollutants in soil. R. Ji, F. Li, S. Wang, F. Sun, J. Liu, J. Gu, Y. Ma 9:00 AGRO 163. Correlation between solvent extractability and bioavailability of benzo(a)pyrene in 19 soils measured in juvenile swine. L. Duan, R. Naidu, K.T. Semple 9:25 AGRO 164. Nature and bioavailability of nonextractable soil residues of the herbicide cloransulam-methyl. G. Sims 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 165. Not extractable residues (NER): How extractable are they? M.J. Telscher 10:35 AGRO 166. Remobilisation of ‘non-extractable’ Benzo[a]pyrene residues in contrasting Australian soils. A. Umeh, L. Duan, K.T. Semple, R. Naidu 11:00 AGRO 167. Characterization of non-extractable residues in famoxadone degradation via kinetics modelling. A.K. Sharma 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Bioactivity Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and GEOC

Sterling Hendricks Memorial Lectureship Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals Kenneth A. Spencer Award: Symposium in Honor of Thomas M. Stevenson Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN T. M. Stevenson, Organizer S. Tyagi, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 168. Synthetic studies towards complex natural products. T.J. Maimone 1:55 AGRO 169. Design and explore sulfur containing heterocyclic insecticides. M. Xu, T. Briddell, E. Hoffmann, D. Cordova 2:20 AGRO 170. Discovery of insecticidal 3-aminopyridyl ureas. W.T. Lambert, A. Buysse, F. Wessels

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

2:20 AGRO 125. Discovery of chemicals that mediate mosquito host-seeking and biting behavior. U.R. Bernier, M. Tsikolia, N. Tabanca, J.R. Bloomquist 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 AGRO 126. Next-gen biorational spatial repellents. J.R. Coats, E.J. Norris, J.S. Klimavicz 3:30 AGRO 127. Toxicity and physiological actions of fatty acids and related potassium channel blockers to mosquitoes. J.R. Bloomquist, F. Demares, Q. Coquerel, G. Richoux, K. Linthicum, U.R. Bernier 3:55 AGRO 128. Evaluating the mode of action of neonicotinoid insecticides and sulfoximine derivatives on Ixodes ricinus nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. S. Thany 4:20 AGRO 129. Designing “smarter” insecticides for vector control. C.A. Hill 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO 2:45 AGRO 171. New 5-phenoxypyrazoles and 4-phenoxypyrazoles as fungicides. J.K. Long, M.J. Mahaffey, A. Taggi 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 AGRO 172. Modular approach to macrocyclic fungicides. K.G. Meyer, C. Yao, B.M. Nugent, F. Li, J.F. Daeuble, K. Bravo-Altamirano, J. Wilmot, W.H. Dent, Y. Lu, R. LaLonde, J. DeLorbe, K. DeKorver, T.A. Boebel 3:55 AGRO 173. N-linked azoles as design elements in bioactive molecules. T.M. Stevenson 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Cosponsored by AGFD J. J. Beck, S. O. Duke, Organizers C. C. Rering, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 174. Chemical mediators of multitrophic interactions for biorational pest management. L.L. Stelinski 1:30 AGRO 175. Combination of host and fungal volatiles provides improved detection of Euwallacea nr. fornicatus in Florida. N. Tabanca, P.E. Kendra, D. Owens, W.S. Montgomery, T. Narvaez, E.Q. Schnell, D. Carrillo 1:55 AGRO 176. Microbiome as novel target for the biocontrol of invasive fruit flies. J. Hernandez, S. Boyles, C. Wong 2:20 AGRO 177. Associations between Drosophila suzukii and fungal microbes. M. Lewis, K.A. Hamby 2:45 AGRO 178. Relationship between diapause preparation and diapause length: A possible target for European corn borer management. J.T. Brown, D. Hahn, R.L. Meagher, J.J. Beck 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 AGRO 179. Identification, synthesis and field activity of sex pheromone of the Tecia solanivora Polvony (Lepidoctera: Gelechiidae), an invasive pest of potatoes. C.A. Sierra, V. Vidal, D. Peña, A. Romero 3:55 AGRO 180. Synthesis of a range of carbohydrate natural based volatile organic compound analogues and the evaluation of their pesticide activity. K. Oxley, N.K. Jalsa 4:20 AGRO 181. Development of lures for blueberry maggot (Rhagoletis mendax). J.C. Kawagoe, S.S. Walse, A. Abrams 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Analytical Methods & Study Designs in Pollinator Studies Financially supported by Golden Pacific Laboratories, JRFA C. M. Bianca, J. Louque, T. F. Moate, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks 1:05 AGRO 182. To bee collect or not to bee collect: Efficiency and efficacy in commodity collections for bee residue studies. P. Moore, M. Lamore, M. Hill, R. Krentz 1:30 AGRO 183. Measuring multiple matrices to determine wild bee exposure to pesticides in an intensively managed agricultural landscape. M.L. Hladik, L. Ward, C. Kremen, N.J. Mills 1:55 AGRO 184. Understanding the impact of pesticide exposure on honey bee immunity. S. O’Neal, T. Anderson 2:20 AGRO 185. Honey bee toxicity of residues on foliage (RT25) study: Issues and possible improvements. R. Singh, D. Schmehl, V. Kramer, B. Sharma, T. Joseph 2:45 AGRO 186. Laboratory challenges associated with small sample size and matrix suppression in nectar and pollen analysis. J. Warnick 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 AGRO 187. Monitoring brood development in honeybee colonies: The right, the wrong and the optimum. V.J. Kramer 3:55 AGRO 188. How pesticides move through honey bee hives. A. Olmstead 4:20 AGRO 189. Determination of cyhalothrin insecticide residues in pollinator matrixes of soybean. T.F. Moate, K. Derewacz, T. Oakes 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

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Joint Reviews for New Pesticides: Success Stories, Challenges & Future Prospects Cosponsored by AGFD Financially supported by Corteva Agriscience, CropLife America, Syngenta, Bayer CropScience, ISK Biosciences, BASF K. D. Racke, Organizer L. Rossi, R. de Moraes, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 190. Australia’s experiences in global joint reviews (GJRs) of pesticides. J. Lutze, A. Norden 1:30 AGRO 191. 20 years of North American collaboration – Lessons learned and future directions. M. Goodis, P. Brander 1:55 AGRO 192. Global joint reviews: Considerations and advances for minor uses. D. Kunkel, J. Baron 2:20 AGRO 193. Europe, Africa and Asia: Regional policy challenges impacting joint submissions. J. Carvalho, K. Fullner, P. Pukclai, R. de Moraes 2:45 AGRO 194. UK experience on joint reviews. D. Flynn, C. Snaith 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 AGRO 195. Plant protection products: Is Europe really interested in global work sharing? G. Rennick 3:45 AGRO 196. Post-market re-evaluation of agricultural chemicals: Challenges and opportunities for international worksharing. R. Aucoin 4:10 AGRO 197. Harmonization of maximum residue limits of pesticides among ASEAN countries. N. Keong 4:35 Panel Discussion.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL Y. Ding, U. Slomczynska, Organizers M. Ma, L. Riter, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 AGRO 198. Transformation of chiral fungicide Inpyrfluxam to stereoisomeric metabolites in confined rotational crops. M.A. Jalal, J. Whitby, T. Nguyen, K. Gohre, S.H. Jackson 1:30 AGRO 199. Application of chromatographic technologies in support of agrochemical research and development. P. Rodwell 1:55 AGRO 200. Enantioselectivity in environmental processing and ecotoxicology of chiral pesticides. W. Liu 2:20 AGRO 201. Separations of chiral molecules in support of process chemistry and formulations research. D. Knueppel, J. Richards 2:45 AGRO 202. Chiral analysis of pesticides using SFC-MS and 2D LC-MS. G. Li, L. Zang, Y. Yang 3:10 Intermission 3:30 AGRO 203. Environmental transformation of the chiral agrochemical Mandestrobin. K. Gohre, J.C. Aston, J.J. Maurer, J. Whitby, T. Nguyen, S.H. Jackson, M.A. Jalal 3:55 AGRO 204. Application of SFC-MS to chiral agricultural active ingredients. J. Richards, D. Knueppel, J.A. Godbey, C. Zu 4:20 AGRO 205. Chiral chromatography of pesticides with SFC and SFC-MS. J.P. Preston, S. Sadjadi 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Flavor Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Food Bioactives, Nano-Technology & Other Delivery Systems Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

AGFD Award Symposium in honor of Dr. Sevim Erhan Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO and PROF

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and GEOC

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC‡ and ORGN S. Tyagi, Organizer T. M. Stevenson, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 206. Physicochemical property guidelines for modern agrochemicals. Y. Zhang, B.A. Lorsbach, C. Scott 8:35 AGRO 207. Synthesis and biological activity of 1,2,4-Triazoles as broad spectrum herbicides. P.L. Sharpe, T.M. Stevenson, M.J. Campbell, T. Cenizal, C. Liberato, E. Reed 9:00 AGRO 208. Chemistry behind the aminoisothiazoles: A new class of herbicides. S. Lehr, D. Bernier, T. Droege, M. Mosrin, J. Rey, J. Tiebes 9:25 AGRO 209. Post-emergence dicot weed control using a novel chemical cluster with a new mode of action. D. Geerdink 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 210. Rational design of agrochemicals: Extending the toolset beyond crystal structures. D. Kloer 10:35 AGRO 211. Quantum of solace for plants: Exploring unprecedented variations of plant hormone Abscisic Acid to identify new lead structures against drought stress in crops. H. Helmke, J. Frackenpohl, J. Franke, J. Freigang, G. Lange 11:00 AGRO 212. Preparation of fenpicoxamid standards to support registration studies. P. Johnson, L. Creemer, K.G. Meyer, R. Ross 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Cosponsored by AGFD S. O. Duke, C. C. Rering, Organizers J. J. Beck, Organizer, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 213. Development of host marking pheromones for the control of fruit flies in Africa: The icipe experience. B. Torto, X. Cheseto, D. Kachigamba, S. Ekesi, M. Ndung’u, P.E. Teal, J.J. Beck 8:35 AGRO 214. Agricultural ecology: Systems to solutions. J.J. Beck, C.C. Rering 9:00 AGRO 215. Attract and kill bait for controlling the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae). C. Stuhl 9:25 AGRO 216. Solventless sampling and GC/MS analyses: A comparative study of three volatile collection techniques. H.T. Alborn, R. Bruton, N. Baig, J.J. Beck 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 217. Competition between nectar specialist and generalist microorganisms: Effects on metabolite emission and pollinator acceptance. C.C. Rering, J.J. Beck, R.L. Vannette, R.N. Schaeffer 10:35 AGRO 218. Impact of flooding on the chemical defenses of maize against the insect pest fall armyworm. A. Block, S.A. Christensen, C. Hunter 11:00 AGRO 219. Diverse environmental stimuli result in differential regulation of plant-produced natural product defenses in maize. S.A. Christensen, E. Schmelz, J. Sims, A. Huffaker, D. Willett, A. Block, C. Hunter, H.T. Alborn 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL M. Pobanz, D. Knueppel, Organizers, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 220. Method development for complex agricultural formulations containing multiple active ingredients. M.D. Evenson 8:35 AGRO 221. Method development for relevant impurities in agricultural formulated products. T. Kajdan 9:00 AGRO 222. Identification of closely related structural and stereoisomeric trace impurity species, via the isolation and purification of these impurities using chiral preparative SFC, allowing for 2D NMR structural studies. J.P. McCauley, M. Twohig 9:25 AGRO 223. Quantitation of a minor impurity in InatreqTM active (Fenpicoxamid) using two-dimensional liquid chromatography. G.A. Vonwald, K. Kuppannan, P. Lewer 9:50 Intermission.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment Cosponsored by ENVR Financially supported by SETAC North America L. Carver, D. Perkins, Organizers, Presiding W. Chen, K. Ryberg, Presiding 8:05 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 AGRO 227. Challenges with site selection, monitoring well placement and sampling for groundwater monitoring of a pre-emergent herbicide in the upper Midwest. T. Xu, R. Jones, D. Netzband, D.R. Gabbert, C. Hassinger, M. Veal, S. Blanchfield 8:35 AGRO 228. Atrazine Ecological Monitoring Program: Study design and conduct. J. Trask, L. Carver, S.M. Chen, M. Cox, K. Marincic 9:00 AGRO 229. Relating sampling bias factors to surface water catchment characteristics for deriving confidence counds on available pesticide monitoring data. R.F. Bohaty, S.C. Hafner, C. Hartless, C. Peck, J. Hook, D.S. Spatz 9:25 Discussion. 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 230. Evaluation of SEAWAVE-QEX as a tool to increase the utility of available pesticide surface water monitoring data. R.F. Bohaty, S.C. Hafner, C. Hartless, C. Peck, J. Hook, D.S. Spatz 10:35 AGRO 231. Interpreting water quality monitoring observations through modeling: PRZM/SWAT and SEAWAVE-Q. D. Perkins, A. Jacobson, C. Roy, F. Abi-Akar, W. Chen 11:00 Panel Discussion. 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR P. L. Havens, Organizer S. Grant, A. M. Ritter, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 AGRO 232. Assessing the effectiveness of vegetative environmental buffers in mitigating ammonia and PM emissions from animal agriculture. C.J. Hapeman, H. Li, M.D. Buser, K. Ro, W.E. Eichinger, J.H. Prueger, J.D. Wanjura, L.L. McConnell, A. Torrents, J.G. Alfieri, G.A. Holt, Q. Yao, Z. Yang, W.B. Willis, P.M. Downey 9:00 AGRO 233. Estimating sulfuryl fluoride emissions during structural fumigation of residential houses. J. Tao 9:25 AGRO 234. Investigation of atmospheric transport of the beneficial microorganism Entomophaga maimaiga using microspheres. H. Thistle 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 AGRO 235. Estimating risk to non-target plants and animals from semi-volatile esticides. C. Peck, F. Khan, K. Garber 10:35 AGRO 236. Comparison of three regulatory methods for estimating volatile flux of pesticides from treated fields. J. Stryker, L. Padilla, J. Dunne, B. Toth 11:00 AGRO 237. Methodology to more realistically compute deposition rates for volatilized pesticides: Refining the deposition velocity term in dispersion models. D.A. Sullivan, R.D. Sullivan, D. Hlinka 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry, Flavor & Health Effects of Teas Chemistry & Biochemistry Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 204A

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR‡ and ORGN R. Acosta Amado, M. Meredith, S. Sumulong, Organizers K. Hodge-Bell, R. Totten, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 AGRO 238. Novel aromatic surfactants. M. Meredith, A.J. Stern, D. Fanfair 2:30 AGRO 239. Overcome common stability challenges in agricultural formulation development. J. Liu, M. Li, R. Acosta Amado, K. Min, P. Larsen, D. Hopkins 2:55 AGRO 240. Compatibility agents for complex tank mix systems. J. Sheehan, J. Bell 3:20 AGRO 241. Effect of carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation on skin sensitization potential of fatty acids and their corresponding methylated esters. R. Acosta Amado, S.C. Gehen, R.S. Settivari 3:45 Intermission. 4:05 AGRO 242. Urea-hydroxyapatite-polymer nanohybrids as seed coatings for enhanced germination of seasonal crops. D. Pabodha, D.N. Rathnaweera, G. Priyadarshana, C. Sandaruwan, H.L. Kumara, K. Purasinhala, S. Chathurika, S. Daraniyagala, V. Karunaratne, N. Kottegoda 4:30 AGRO 243. Hydroxyapatite-citric acid nanohybrids for optimum release of phosphorus in fertilizer applications. R. Samavini, C. Sandaruwan, M.R. de Silva, G. Priyadarshana, N. Kottegoda, V. Karunaratne 4:55 AGRO 244. Encapsulation of biologics for agricultural applications. K.H. Kucharzyk, A.D. Duong, R.L. Jones, J. Arnold 5:20 AGRO 245. New emulsifier system with improved Clethodim stability for emulsifiable concentrate formulations. E. Weber 5:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

Strategies for Radiolabeling Agrochemicals in Regulatory Studies & Advanced Techniques for Characterization Cosponsored by ORGN Y. Yuan, Organizer M. Ma, G. C. Nallani, Organizers, Presiding Y. Yuan, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 AGRO 246. Synthesis of radiolabeled standards of bicyclopyrone and sedaxane to support product development. S. Tyagi, C.D. Cook, J.W. Perine, D.D. Dixon, B.P. McKillican, J.A. Key 2:30 AGRO 247. Production of isotopically labelled natural products and metabolites by microbial fermentation and biotransformation. F. Scheffler, N. Geach 2:55 AGRO 248. Case study: Natural product stability. N. Geach, M. Jones, P. Morgan 3:20 AGRO 249. Carbon-14 labeling and synthetic strategies of imazamox and metabolites. E. Tjaden, H. Pennaka, V. Murrell, M. Han, N. L’Helias, D. Classen 3:45 Intermission. 4:05 AGRO 250. Strategies for labelling test substances for regulatory studies. A.K. Sharma, D.L. Ryan, C. Fang 4:30 AGRO 251. Strategies for isotopic labeling of agrochemical active ingredients to enable registration. B. Canturk, P. Johnson, M. Ma, J. Balcer, G.T. Whiteker, R. Ross 4:55 AGRO 252. Using radio-HPLC and radio-TLC in tandem for the quantification and confirmation of known metabolites in support of agrochemical product development. J. O’Neill 5:20 AGRO 253. Use of radiolabeled and stable labeled test substances in regulatory metabolism studies for agrochemicals. K. Ahn, T. Fleischmann 5:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR M. Saha, W. Su, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks.

2:05 AGRO 254. CESI-MS for agrochemical analysis. S.S. Walse, E. Rangel, W.A. Hall 2:30 AGRO 255. Strategies for extraction and cleanup prior to LC-MS/MS determination of dicamba and other acidic herbicide residues in agricultural samples; consideration for bound and unbound compounds and metabolites. M.S. Young, K. Tran 2:55 AGRO 256. Expansion of pesticide analysis screen by high resolution mass spectrometry in fresh produce in a regulatory environment. G. Gerard 3:20 AGRO 257. Coating-free, “quick-and-easy” scanning electron microscopy imaging of agricultural samples. N.J. Carter 3:45 Intermission. 4:05 AGRO 258. Analytical methods to quantify off-target movement of dicamba. L. Riter 4:30 AGRO 259. Application of Raman microscopy in pesticide formulation analysis. K. Smith, T. Prusnick 4:55 AGRO 260. Analytical method lifecycle through crop protection product phase advancement. W. Su 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR A. Hood, G. OSullivan, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 AGRO 261. State of our world: An argument for watchful optimism. J.M. Stewart 2:30 AGRO 262. Chemophobia – Simply semantics or something deeper?: How to have a discussion with a nonscientist. D.A. Koch 2:55 AGRO 263. Politics and the news cycle: How to cut through the noise. G. OSullivan 3:20 AGRO 264. Hogwash: Battling misinformation on the front lines of the public sphere. M. Mangan 3:45 Intermission. 4:05 AGRO 265. When analytical data deceive: Separating fact from fiction. W. Reeves 4:30 AGRO 266. Moms, milk, and Monsanto: The precise conditions for a perfect storm. M. McGuire, M. McGuire 4:55 AGRO 267. Agroecosystem approach for endangered species. G. Watson 5:20 AGRO 268. Deficit model: Avoid it. D.J. Gentleman 5:45 Discussion.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 5

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR A. M. Ritter, Organizer S. Grant, P. L. Havens, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 AGRO 269. Analysis of weather and environmental factors associated with off-target dicamba movement. M. Bish 2:30 AGRO 270. Dicamba emissions after application appear related to temperature, formulation, and adding glyphosate to the spray mixture. T.C. Mueller, L. Steckel 2:55 AGRO 271. Evaluating spatial scale effects of dicamba applications on off-target vapor movement. T. Orr, N. Pai, E. Sall, C. DesAutels, J. Popovic, R. Reiss 3:20 AGRO 272. Monte Carlo modeling methods for county-wide and regional analysis of pesticide airborne concentrations and drift for volatilized pesticides. D.A. Sullivan, R.D. Sullivan, D. Hlinka 3:45 Intermission. 4:05 AGRO 273. SOFEA3 modeling of 1,3-dichloropropene concentrations in ambient air in high fumigant use areas of the United States. O. de Cirugeda Helle, I. van Wesenbeeck, S. Cryer 4:30 Panel Discussion. 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Agricultural Based Natural Products as Biorational Pesticides Cosponsored by AGFD J. J. Beck, S. O. Duke, C. C. Rering, Organizers

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10:10 AGRO 224. Unifying, informatics-based approach to life cycle management of impurity data. J. DiMartino, A. Anderson, S.K. Bhal, G. McGibbon 10:35 AGRO 225. Mass spectrometry based structure elucidation of impurities in synthetic agrochemicals using modern instrumentation and software tools. C. Zu, D. Knueppel, M. Wadsley, B. Bruce 11:00 AGRO 226. On-line measurements for process monitoring, development and manufacturing of Monsanto’s crop protection products. D.S. Malkin, L. Yuan, L. Nguyen, C.S. Zuniga, D.D. Soleta, W. Gavlick 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 274. Drought-induced effects on buckwheat (fa*gopyrum esculentum) floral traits and honey bee visitation. R.E. Mallinger, C.C. Rering, J.G. Franco, J.J. Beck AGRO 275. Comparative analysis of diamide formulations on pest and beneficial insects. J. Williams, T. Anderson, D. Swale AGRO 276. Monoterpenoid and phenylpropanoid esters as long-lasting mosquito repellents. J.S. Klimavicz, C.L. Corona, J.R. Coats AGRO 277. Analysis of activity of monoterpenoid plant compounds on a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. C. Wong, M. Abongwa, S. Choudhary, A. Robertson, R.J. Martin, J.R. Coats AGRO 278. Natural compound spororium A protects tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea by priming the jasmonic acid pathways. L. Cao, S. Zhao, W. Yan, Y. Ye AGRO 279. Using biosolarization with almond byproduct amendments to disinfest almond orchard soil during preplant processing and improve soil quality. E. Shea, E. Lopez, J.D. Fernandez Bayo, A. Parr, J. Milkereit, Y. Achmon, A. Hodson, J. Stapleton, J. VanderGheynst, C. Simmons

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Around the World with Pesticide Maximum Residue Levels Cosponsored by AGFD P. A. Brindle, H. B. Irrig, C. Tiu, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 280. Residue analysis of thiametoxam and its metabolite clothianidin during cultivation of strawberry and tomato. Y. Jeon, J. Jung, S. Park, H. Jung, S. Chai, J. Park, T. Kim AGRO 281. Import tolerances in Taiwan procedure, challenges & progress. J. Chen AGRO 282. Comparison of pesticide residues in Korea cabbage and shallot by morphological characteristics of plant. H. Kim, S. Lee, K. Se-Yeon, S. Cho, J. Kim, K. Kyung

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Assessing Risk, Providing Benefit: Making Informed Decisions in Endangered Species Pesticide Risk Management Cosponsored by AGFD P. Ashfield, D. D. Campbell, M. Dobbs, G. Hall, L. Honey, B. McGaughey, C. Tortorici, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 283. Toxicity evaluation of combined contamination of herbicide and heavy metals on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) in urban soil. X. Li, W. Chen, M. Wang, X. Li AGRO 284. Field air SPME analysis of free-ranging giant pandas in Wolong nature reserve. A.E. Brown, A. Wilson, D.L. Sparks, K. Knott, S. Willard, T. Connor, Z. Zejun AGRO 285. Ecological risk evaluation of combined pollution of herbicide siduron and heavy metals in soils. M. Wang, R. Jiang, W. Chen

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL Y. Ding, M. Ma, L. Riter, U. Slomczynska, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 286. Food antibiotic residues in early life enantioselectively alter the murine gut microbiome and the immune response. M. Zhao AGRO 287. Systemic stereoselectivity bioactivity study of chiral fungicide prothioconazole and its metabolite in agricultural management. Z. Zhang AGRO 288. Chiral amide herbicide metolachlor: Enantioseparation, stereoselective bioactivity and environmental behavior. L. Zhao, J. Xie, W. Liu AGRO 289. Differences between C-chiral enantiomers and axial-chiral enantiomers on enantiomeric separation. J. Xie, W. Liu AGRO 290. Methods for improving chiral HPLC separation of agrochemicals that are present as multiple isomers in biological, soil and water/sediment matrices. M. Lee, M. Ponte

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SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Designing Better Studies: Issues & Improvements in Pollinator Studies C. M. Bianca, J. Louque, T. F. Moate, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 291. Modeling of nectar requirements for nectar foraging honey bees (Apis mellifera). S. Rodney AGRO 292. Monitoring brood development in honeybee colonies: Which eggs to select and how many? V.J. Kramer AGRO 293. LC-MS/MS method for estimating the exposure to neonicotinoid residues in pollinator attractive habitat adjacent to corn and soybean fields. M.J. Hall, V. Dang, G. Zhang, M. O’Neal, D. Borts, S. Bradbury, J.R. Coats AGRO 294. Gut symbiont viability of honey bees exposed to chemical stressors. B. Gabriel, T. Anderson

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Environmental Fate, Transport & Modeling of Agriculturally-Related Chemicals

AGRO 306. Use of microtransplanted rat brain tissue in Xenopus oocytes to determine the toxicodynamic differences of pyrethroids on sodium channel isoforms in juvenile and adult mammalian brains. E. Murenzi, A.C. Toltin, S.B. Symington, J.M. Clark AGRO 307. Novel target for insecticide design: Mechanistic and structural analysis of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase from the red flour beetle. B. O’Flynn, D.J. Merkler AGRO 308. Sulfoximine derivative, sulfoxaflor, activates imidacloprid-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on insect neurosecretory cells. B. Moambi, J. Houchat, A. Cartereau, M. Mathe-Allainmat, J. Lebreton, J. Graton, J. Le Questel, S. Thany AGRO 309. Photochromic imidacloprid for optical control of insecticide performance. X. Shao AGRO 310. Design of selective anti-juvenile hormone agents based on the structural analysis of apo, ligand-, and inhibitor-bound type II FPPS of the spruce budworm. E. Aerts, B. Moradia, S.E. Sen, M. Picard, R. Shi, C. Béliveau, M. Cusson AGRO 311. Phytochemical synergists: enhancing pyrethroids with natural plant compounds. E. Norris, M. Archevald, A.D. Gross, L. Bartholomay, J.R. Coats

SECTION F

S. H. Jackson, R. L. Warren, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 295. Fate and transport of brominated estradiols as surrogates for native 17ß-estradiol in an agricultural field. H. Hakk, F.X. Casey AGRO 296. Use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) in assessing volatility in agrochemical discovery lead optimization. L. Cai, C. Pedersen, S. Strachan AGRO 297. Spatial variability of DDT in aged contaminated soil and its bioavailability to indigenous earthworms. Z. Yang, C.J. Hapeman, A. Torrents, M.O. Anderson, T. LaChance, R.E. Plummer, L.L. McConnell, D. Jackson AGRO 298. Estimation of 1,3-dichloropropene flux by application method under California use conditions using HYDRUS 2-D. C.R. Brown, F.C. Spurlock AGRO 299. Occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant genes in cow manure-fertilized Zea mays. R. Mullen, J. Hurst, K. Naas, L. Sassoubre, D.S. Aga AGRO 300. Using geospatial techniques for effective product stewardship. A.M. Ritter, C. Hoogeweg, M.A. Thomas, A. Kirk AGRO 301. Degradation studies: Solvent systems including both polar and nonpolar solvents to extract residues from soil matrix. C. Wijntjes, D. Adam, W. Völkel, S. Höger AGRO 302. Improved extraction techniques for regulatory metabolism studies of agrochemicals. L. Nguyen, B. Nguyen, K. Ahn, T. Fleischmann

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

SECTION F

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Environmental Study Design: Current & Emerging Guidelines Cosponsored by ENVR H. Adusumilli, A. Chen, Q. Yao, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 303. Predicting environmental fate of agrochemicals in irradiated water-sediment systems. L. Laughiln, M. Spradlin AGRO 304. Bioconcentration factor-based soil management guideline through uptake pattern of pesticide by radish. K. Se-Yeon, S. Lee, S. Cho, H. Kim, J. Hwang, J. Kim

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Good Laboratory Practices for the Agrochemical Professional K. Daigle, C. Lee, K. Watson, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 305. Global aspects and demands on cooperation with a CRO. A. Irmer, M. Traub, B. Rieder

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

INSecticide TARgets (INSTAR) Summit T. Anderson, J. R. Bloomquist, J. M. Clark, T. C. Sparks, D. Swale, K. Y. Zhu, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) Bio-Accessibility & Potential Risks Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR M. Kastner, M. Telscher, M. Zhang, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 312. Effects of coal tar as source material on the desorption kinetics of benzo(a)pyrene from contaminated soils. L. Yu, L. Duan, R. Naidu, K.T. Semple AGRO 313. Non-extractable residues of agrochemicals in soil in the regulatory context. T. Junge

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR A. Hood, G. OSullivan, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 319. Bayer’s Science Transparency Initiative: Enabling access to safety studies. S. Myers

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR J. W. Perine, H. Thistle, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 314. Spray drift and pest control from aerial applications on soybeans. J.A. Cunha, R. Barizon, V. Ferracini, M. Assalin, U.R. Antuniassi AGRO 315. Initial measurement and evaluation of spray drift from an unmanned aerial vehicle. C.R. Brown, D.K. Giles AGRO 316. Effect of evaporation rate and recent deposition dataset on AGDISP spray drift modeling for herbicide tank mix partners. M. Kim, R. Morris AGRO 317. Three dimensional plant modelling with open source software for use in spray particle deposition simulations. J. Dunne, S. Grant, L. Padilla, J.W. Perine, M. Ledson AGRO 318. Advancing pesticide management strategies for citrus greening disease. H. Miller, R. Rehberg, R. Menger, C. Henry, P. Ode, P. Trivedi, T. Borch

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Protection of Sustainable Agricultural Productivity, Public Health & the Environment: General Session J. E. Eble, Organizer 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 320. Urinary excretion and tissue residues of zilpaterol HCl after trace-level exposures. D.J. Smith, W.L. Shelver AGRO 321. FOCUS and NAFTA degradation kinetics are too conservative? — Aged sorption affects the kinetic modeling of pesticide degradation in soil. P. Sharma, S. Qiu

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Role of Monitoring Data in Advancing Regulatory Risk Assessment Cosponsored by ENVR L. Carver, D. Perkins, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 331. Estimation of concentration percentiles for pesticide surface water monitoring data. P. Mosquin, J. Aldworth, W. Chen AGRO 332. Evaluation of SEAWAVE-Q Model for providing daily predictions from non-daily sampled atrazine surface-water concentration monitoring data. J. Aldworth, P. Mosquin, W. Chen AGRO 333. Spatial and temporal analysis approach to quantify pesticide concentrations in surface water. R.F. Bohaty, S.C. Hafner, C. Hartless, C. Peck, J. Hook, D.S. Spatz

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL T. Gaines, Organizer 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 334. Association between a SNP and cytochrome P450-mediated herbicide resistance in Lolium spp. populations. M. Yanniccari, R. Gigón AGRO 335. Metabolic resistance to tribenuron-methyl in Descurainia sophia L. conferred by cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP96A146). Q. Yang, Y. Xu, J. Shen, J. Li, H. Liu, M. Zheng AGRO 336. Metabolic and multiple resistance in junglerice from Mississippi. V. Nandula

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Strategies for Radiolabeling Agrochemicals in Regulatory Studies & Advanced Techniques for Characterization Cosponsored by ORGN M. Ma, G. C. Nallani, Y. Yuan, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 337. Environmental metabolism studies with carbon-14 labelled plant protection products. N. Geach, A. Irmer AGRO 338. Considerations for selection of 14C radioactive tracers and 13C stable label analogs to aid metabolite identification by mass spectrometry. S. Mathys, J. LaMar, T. Fleischmann

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Surfactant & Colloid Science as Applied to Agrochemical Formulations Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR‡ and ORGN R. Acosta Amado, K. Hodge-Bell, M. Meredith, S. Sumulong, R. Totten, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 339. Water quality influence on dilution properties of an oil-in-water emulsion agricultural formulation. N.V. de Castro, R. Acosta Amado AGRO 340. Systematic approach to identify and solve tank mix incompatibility of crop protection products. H. Jeon, R. Acosta Amado, R. Degenhardt, M. Olds, H. Shao, M. Somasi AGRO 341. Stabilization of a suspension concentrate agricultural formulation with xanthan gum in high electrolyte environment. G. Powels, R. Acosta Amado AGRO 342. Improving the chemical stability of emulsifiable concentrate agricultural formulations. B. Perez, R. Acosta Amado, M. Li AGRO 343. SLOPE PIT method to characterize surfactants. S. Deprey, P. Ravier, P. Van der Weeën

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Synthesis & Chemistry of Agrochemicals: ACS Industrial Chemistry Award Symposium in honor of George P. Lahm Cosponsored by AGFD, ENVR, I&EC and ORGN T. M. Stevenson, S. Tyagi, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 344. Challenging the accepted SAR of diaryl imidazole broad-spectrum fungicides. C. Liberato, J.K. Long, A. Taggi, T.P. Selby, M. Hanagan, E. Marshall, J. Bereznak, S. McCann, J. Bisaha AGRO 345. Mesoionic pyrido[1,2-α]pyrimidinones as insecticides. T. Briddell AGRO 346. Pyraziflumid as a novel SDHI fungicide: SARs and synthetic methods. M. Oda, T. Furuya, Y. Morish*ta, Y. Matsuzaki, M. Hasebe, N. Kuroki ‡

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR J. Balcer, J. Ferguson, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 347. Improved extraction and SPE cleanup protocols for LC-MS determination of ractopamine and other betaagonist drugs in tissue samples. M.S. Young, K. Tran AGRO 348. Fate of pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants during reverse osmosis of source-separated human urine for agricultural fertilizer application. B. Wombacher, D.S. Aga AGRO 349. Improving chromatographic performance of underivatized anionic polar pesticides in food to overcome renowned analytical challenges. D. Shah, M.S. Young AGRO 350. Comparison of cleanup efficiency for multiresidue analysis of pesticides in soybean by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. S. Lee, J. Kim, K. Se-Yeon, Y.D. Lee, H. Kim, S. Cho AGRO 351. Global reconnaissance of antimicrobial residues in wastewater and surface waters. L. Angeles, D.S. Aga AGRO 352. Automatic MS data analysis to reveal the metabolic pathway of flonicamid in oranges. I. Zamora, B. Serra, E. Ortega-Carrasco, R. Romero Gonzalez, A. Garrido Frenich, R. López-Ruiz

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom Pre-Function

Vector-Borne Diseases: Role of Chemistry in Managing Risks to Humans, Domestics Animals, Aquaculture & Wildlife A. D. Gross, D. Swale, W. M. Williams, Organizers 11:30 – 2:00 AGRO 353. Assessing the environmental risk of pesticides, biopesticides, and anthelmintics used in managing vectorborne diseases. W.M. Williams, J. Amos, M.W. Guevara, A.M. Ritter

AGRO 354. Comparison of the patterns of resistance and cross-resistance to insecticides conferred by the two major mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in Aedes aegypti. L.B. Smith, J.G. Scott AGRO 355. Chemical modulation of Aedes aegypti inward rectifier potassium ion channels prevents blood feeding and secretory activity of the salivary gland. A. Soohoo-Hui, D. Swale AGRO 356. Chemical inhibition of inward rectifier potassium (Kir) ion channels prevents feeding and salivation of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii. Z. Li, J. Davis, D. Swale AGRO 357. Altering K+ spatial buffering events through modulation of inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels leads to nervous system failure and insect mortality. R. Chen, D. Swale AGRO 358. Biorational products are effective spatial mosquito repellents against mosquitoes of multiple genera. C.L. Corona, E.J. Norris, J.S. Klimavicz, J.R. Coats AGRO 359. Targeting ATP-sensitive inward rectifier potassium (KATP) channels to reduce the physiological burden of oxidative stress in European honey bees, Apis mellifera. C.J. Fellows, T. Anderson, D. Swale AGRO 360. High-throughput screening apparatus for evaluating spatial repellency and vapor toxicity of commercially available and candidate repellent compounds. S. Jiang, L. Yang, M. Tsikolia, U.R. Bernier, K. Linthicum, J.R. Bloomquist

Advances in Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs: Impact on the Future of the Food & Drug & Agrochemical Industry Sponsored by BMGT, Cosponsored by AGRO‡

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

Environmental Obesogens: Exposure Pathways, Mechanism of Action & Trends Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

WEDNESDAY EVENING Chemistry of Struvite & Slow Release Fertilizers: From Fundamentals of Crystal Growth to Engineered Nutrient Recovery & Their Release Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡

Environmental Obesogens: Exposure Pathways, Mechanism of Action & Trends Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

Waste to Product: Biological & Physicochemical Resource Recovery & Efficiency Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

Water Reuse & Recycling: Innovative Solutions for Treatment & Implementation Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 1

AGRO-SETAC Joint Symposium: Challenges of Utilizing Higher-Tier Ecotoxicity Data in Risk Assessment & Risk Management of Pesticides Cosponsored by AGFD and ENVR Financially supported by SETAC North America S. Levine, Organizer G. P. Cobb, L. L. McConnell, Organizers, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 AGRO 361. Facilitating engagement on regulatory science in agriculture. L.L. McConnell, I.D. Kelly, A. Ayers, D. Carley 8:55 AGRO 362. How higher-tier data can strengthen a pesticide risk assessment: examples with pyrethroids. J. Giddings, R. Jones, S.H. Jackson, T. Valenti

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AGRO 322. Photo-enhanced soil metabolism of atrazine. S. Habeeb, S.P. McLaughlin, M. Tuffy AGRO 323. Estrone in aquatic systems in the presence of poultry litter and cow manure: Determination of its fate, degree of mineralization, and changes in its endocrine disrupting potential. M.E. Guardian, D.S. Aga AGRO 324. Soybean response to dicamba and 2,4-D in simulated furrow irrigation. C.D. Willett, E. Grantz, J.A. Lee, M.N. Thompson, J.K. Norsworthy AGRO 325. Residual characteristics of triflumizole in water dropwort and shallot. J. Lee, H. Park, M. Jin, S. Jo, J. Lim, H. Shin, H. Noh, J. Lee, J. Kim, C. Kwon, J. Kim, T. Kim, K.S. Kyung AGRO 326. Changes of pyraclostrobin and its metabolite BF 500-3 residues in spinach and Korean cabbage. S. Jo, H. Park, M. Jin, J. Lee, J. Lim, H. Shin, H. Noh, J. Lee, J. Kim, C. Kwon, J. Kim, T. Kim, K.S. Kyung AGRO 327. Dissipation characteristics of cyflufenamide and fenvalerate residues in perilla leaves. J. Lim, H. Park, M. Jin, J. Lee, S. Jo, H. Shin, H. Noh, J. Lee, J. Kim, C. Kwon, J. Kim, T. Kim, K.S. Kyung AGRO 328. Residual characteristics of fosthiazate and imidacloprid in spinach. H. Shin, H. Park, M. Jin, J. Lee, S. Jo, J. Lim, H. Noh, J. Lee, J. Kim, C. Kwon, J. Kim, T. Kim, K.S. Kyung AGRO 329. Bioavailability of HBCD/TBB/TBPH from dust and oil vehicles in Sprague-Dawley rats. H. Hakk, S.J. Lupton, A. Singh AGRO 330. Interaction of glufosinate and Colletotrichum truncatum on ammonia levels and glutamine synthetase activity in hemp sesbania. R.E. Hoagland, C.D. Boyette, R.H. Jordan, K.C. Stetina

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

AGRO/ANYL 9:20 AGRO 363. Probabilistic model for assessing risk to bird species potentially exposed to seed treatment pesticides. D. Moore, S. Teed, C. Priest, T. Fredricks, L. Schuler 9:45 AGRO 364. Evaluation of potential impacts of insecticides on aquatic invertebrates: Higher tier evaluations for risk management. D.G. Dyer, J. Tang, S. McGee 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 AGRO 365. Opportunities and challenges of using NHDPlus connectivity data in refined modeling of aquatic exposure in flowing water bodies at the watershed scale. H. Rathjens, M. Winchell, P. Whatling 10:55 AGRO 366. Improving how we interpret results from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) and the medaka extended one generation reproduction Test (MEOGRT). H. Krueger, D. Huggett, J. Wolf 11:20 AGRO 367. Leveraging product specific residue data to refine dietary ecological assessments. S. Levine 11:45 AGRO 368. Potential phototoxic response of Red Swamp Crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) to herbicides and fungicides. E.N. Vebrosky, W. Xu, L.M. Basirico, C.G. Lutz, K.L. Armbrust 12:10 Panel Discussion.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 2

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL P. Reibach, M. C. Ruebelt, Organizers, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 AGRO 369. Biotechnology: RNAi, antisense oligonucleotides and CRISPR strategies to reduce psyllids and bacterial pathogens in citrus trees. W.B. Hunter 8:55 AGRO 370. Genome editing: Technology for creating genetic variation in crop plants. R. Gaeta 9:20 AGRO 371. Genetic improvement of potato by INNATE® and gene editing technologies. H. Duan 9:45 AGRO 372. Low-cost and scalable production of RNA via cell-free bioprocessing. J. Abshire, K. Ramachandriya 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 AGRO 373. SmartStax®PRO: The first commercial transgenic crop expressing insecticidal dsRNA to control corn rootworm. W. Moar, C. Khajuria, S. Evans, G. Head, T. Clark 10:55 AGRO 374. Midgut RNAi-based gene target for western corn rootworm control. A. Sethi 11:20 AGRO 375. RNAi - Registration requirements for risk assessment inputs. P. Reibach 11:45 AGRO 376. EPA registration of dsRNAi Plant Incorporated Protectants: Implications for gene edited products. K. Matthews 12:10 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 3

Contract Research, Good Laboratory Practices & Other Challenges for the Agrochemical Professional C. Lee, K. Watson, Organizers K. Daigle, K. Malekani, Organizers, Presiding J. Nag, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 AGRO 377. Planning, performing, recording, reporting and archiving of analytical impurity profiling studies in compliance with principles of GLP. L. Sanghani 8:55 AGRO 378. Roles of the Study Director, Management, Sponsor and the Quality Assurance Unit: GLP test control, reference substance preparation and characterization. C. Lee, M. Coyle-Rees, V. Erikson 9:20 AGRO 379. Use of quality metrics to drive the culture of continual improvements. C. Hughes, P.M. Sarff, J. Dutton 9:45 AGRO 380. Best practices for obtaining samples of known quality. K. Watson 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 AGRO 381. EPA good laboratory compliance. D. Meyers 10:55 AGRO 382. Industry: A look at the challenges facing CROs in the 21st century. M.A. Ponte 11:20 AGRO 383. Safety evaluation: Transport of dangerous goods – guideline requirement, challenges and solution. J. Patel 11:45 Discussion. 12:10 Concluding Remarks.

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SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Ballroom East - Theater 4

Legal Aspects of Agriculture, Agrochemicals & Agribusiness Cosponsored by AGFD and PROF R. Bennett, A. Coates, J. M. Van Emon, Organizers, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 AGRO 384. View from ten thousand feet: How has agriculture been impacted by legal changes over the past 20 years? R.M. Bennett 8:55 AGRO 385. Introduction to the systems for agrochemical patent term extension across Europe. S. Adams 9:20 AGRO 386. Patenting the unpatentable? Opportunities for protecting trade secret processes under the America Invents Act. J.L. Krieger 9:45 AGRO 387. Resistance and trait considerations in plant protection products. J. Steffel 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 AGRO 388. Continuing evolution of the coordinated framework: Implications for agricultural biotechnology. K. Matthews 10:55 AGRO 389. Opportunities and challenges for obtaining and defending patents in genetically modified or altered agricultural products, in creating new life forms, and in improved in agrochemical processes. X. Pillai 11:20 AGRO 390. GMO patents in the courtroom. C.A. Burton 11:45 Discussion. 12:10 Concluding Remarks.

Drug Discovery: Cheminformatic Approaches Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by AGRO

10:40 ANYL 6. Nanoplasmonics for characterizing cell population heterogeneity. B.M. Reinhard 11:10 ANYL 7. Full 3D orientation and position determination of single anisotropic nanoparticles with dualfocus dark-field microscopy. N. Fang, X. Cheng, K. Chen 11:40 ANYL 8. Porous silicon nanoparticles as luminescent probes. M.J. Sailor

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Paper Devices for Bioanalysis C. Mace, Organizer M. R. Lockett, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 ANYL 9. Advances in paper-based fluidic devices. A.W. Martinez, N.W. Martinez, E. Strong, M.M. Troje 8:35 ANYL 10. Molecular technologies for robust detection of proteins in bodily fluids. H.D. Sikes 9:05 ANYL 11. Methods for blood preparation and analysis using paper-based devices. C. Mace, S. Fernandes, J.C. Brooks, K.R. Baillargeon, L.P. Murray 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 ANYL 12. Electrochemistry on paper and string. G.M. Whitesides 10:20 ANYL 13. Porous microfluidic sensors for field use. E. Fu 10:50 ANYL 14. Issues of the nano-bio interface in paper based immunoassays. K. Hamad-Schifferli 11:20 ANYL 15. Generating signal at converging liquid fronts in three-dimensional paper-based microfluidic devices. D. Wilson, R. Parker, C. Mace 11:50 ANYL 16. Single cell detection in raw sample by a piece of membrane. X. Lin, X. Huang, M.R. Hoffmann

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

ANYL

Division of Analytical Chemistry L. Baker and M. Bush, Program Chairs OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Structures and Functions of Glycans (see CARB, Sun, Mon) Environmental Nanometrology (see ENVR, Sun) From Lab to Tap: Implications of Scaling up Nano-enabled Environmental Technologies (see ENVR, Wed) Microplastic Pollution: Sources, Sinks, and Solutions (see ENVR, Mon) SOCIAL EVENTS: ANYL Reception, 5:00 PM: Tue

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS X. Xu, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 ANYL 1. Development of new luminescent and single molecule optical probes for bio-imaging inside by energy conversion application. P. Alivisatos 8:30 ANYL 2. Super bright luminescent Ag and Au nanoparticles for imaging and sensing. H. Dai 9:00 ANYL 3. Imaging organelle interactions at superresolution for almost forever and in multiple colors. A. Schepartz 9:30 ANYL 4. Multifunctional size-dependent drug nanocarriers for probing multidrug membrane transporters of single live cells. X. Xu, P. Songkiatisak, P. Cherukuri, F. Ding, T. Huang 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 ANYL 5. Low photodamage label-free imaging of single cell activity aimed at mapping neuronal activity. M. Didier, O. Tarun, S. Roke

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡ G. Wang, Organizer N. Fang, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 ANYL 17. Bond-selective phase contrast microscopy at sub-micron spatial resolution and millisecond temporal resolution. J. Cheng, D. Zhang, L. Lan 9:30 ANYL 18. Resolving single protein dynamics at polymer interfaces. C.F. Landes 9:55 ANYL 19. Developing three-dimensional single particle tracking in complicated environment using deep learning neural networks. Y. Zhong, H. Zhou, G. Wang 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 ANYL 20. Live-cell bioorthogonal chemical imaging. W. Min 10:55 ANYL 21. Nanophotonic technologies for singlemolecule microscopy and spectroscopy. R.H. Goldsmith 11:20 ANYL 22. Peakforce infrared microscopy: Noninvasive correlative infrared and mechanical imaging at sub 10nm spatial resolution. X. Xu, L. Wang, H. Wang, D.S. Jakob 11:40 ANYL 23. Development of combinatorial spectromicroscopic system for understanding nanoscale and mesoscale structures and dynamics. F. Zhao

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Student Organized Symposia: Supramolecular Analytical Chemistry Cosponsored by YCC Financially supported by ACS Sensor; College of Arts & Science, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the University of Alabama; ISS, Inc. M. Ihde, X. Liang, J. Tropp, Y. Xu, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 ANYL 24. Auto-inductive cascades and differential sensing: A union of physical organic chemistry and analytical sciences. E.V. Anslyn 8:50 ANYL 25. High-content screening of anti-cancer therapeutics using gold nanoparticle-fluorescent protein supramolecular sensors. Y. Geng, N. Le, S. Rana, H. Goel, T. Yoshii, A. Mercurio, V.M. Rotello 9:10 ANYL 26. Sensing fluoride and cyanide anions in water using cationic main group Lewis acids. F.P. Gabbai 9:40 ANYL 27. Photo-responsive molecular baskets capable of removing/releasing targeted molecules in water. J. Badjic

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in honor of Professor Guibin Jiang

SECTION E

Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Merck Research Award Symposium Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by ANYL, COMP, MEDI and PROF

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward

Analytical Technology & Application Innovations in Pharma

Environmental Nanometrology

E. Jameson, Organizer, Presiding M. Strohmeier, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 ANYL 31. Innovation and novel applications for pharmaceutical analysis. P. Faustino 9:25 ANYL 32. Drug quality assurance to combat counterfeit Streptomycin and Rifampicin using facile, low cost colorimetry. M.R. Foster, S. Williams 9:40 ANYL 33. Purity analysis of volatile/reactive building block chemicals without UV chromophore by HPLC-charged aerosol detection. L. Dai 9:55 ANYL 34. Biomarker quantitation by HILIC LC-MSMS. S. Tentarelli 10:10 ANYL 35. Development of a two-dimensional liquid chromatography method for functionalized high molecular weight polyethylene polymer analysis. J. Wang, S. Yang, K. Zhang 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 ANYL 36. Solid state NMR spectroscopy as an advanced characterization tool for pharmaceutical solids to support regulatory science. A. Mohammad, P. Faustino 10:55 ANYL 37. Mid-infrared photothermal imaging of active pharmaceutical ingredients at submicrometer spatial resolution. C. Li, D. Zhang, J. Cheng 11:10 ANYL 38. Image analysis for calibration-free determination of crystallinity in amorphous solid dispersions. A. Sherman, P. Stroud, J. Hinds, C. Smith, G.J. Simpson 11:25 ANYL 39. Triboluminescence instrumentation for analysis of residual crystallinity in amorphous pharmaceutical formulations. S. Griffin, C. Smith, G. Eakins, S. Zhang, J. Novak, Z. Liu, T.A. Rhodes, G.J. Simpson 11:40 Concluding Remarks.

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Nanoelectroanalytical Chemistry for Biological & Material Sciences S. Amemiya, Organizer, Presiding J. Kim, M. Shen, Presiding 8:00 ANYL 40. Electroanalytical evaluation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles by nano-impact electrochemistry: Methodology and analytical applications. E. Andreescu, K. Kirk, F.H. Narouei, A. Karimi 8:25 ANYL 41. Nanostructured microsensors for monitoring circulating nucleic acids. J. Das, S.O. Kelley 8:50 ANYL 42. Three-dimensional polyfilter interface for sensitive and selective detection of low-molecular-weight biomarker using potentiometric biosensor. S. Nish*tani, T. Sakata 9:15 ANYL 43. Bipolar electrode-induced electrokinetic effects in nanochannels generate fluorescence enhancement and sharp pH gradients in the absence of a voltage bias. K. Scida, N. Arroyo-Currás, Y. Satik, A. Eden, J.C. Eijkel, S. Pennathur 9:40 ANYL 44. Enhanced electron transfer mediated by conjugated polyelectrolyte and its application to washingfree DNA detection. S. Park, H. Woo, H. Yang 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 ANYL 45. Core/shell nanorods based dielectrophoresis for biomarker concentration and detection. J. Fu, Z. Cao, Y. Zhu 10:40 ANYL 46. Development of nanostructural biochips for various types of cancer marker determination. F. Ko 11:05 ANYL 47. Detection and discrimination of isomeric volatile organics on the surface of zinc ferrite chemi-resistor. K. Mukherjee, M. Zaghloul 11:30 ANYL 48. Dual-emitting-based sensing nanomaterials. H. Tantan, C. Wang, C. Wang 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS X. Xu, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 49. Protein quantification in single cancer cells using single molecule arrays. D.R. Walt, J. Geldart Flashman 2:00 ANYL 50. Highly multiplexed and high-throughput analysis of single cells. D.T. Chiu 2:30 ANYL 51. Mass cytometric analysis of single-cell cells. E.A. Arriaga, H. Brown 3:00 ANYL 52. Nanoparticle medicated single-cell analysis using magnetic ranking cytometry. M. Labib, S.O. Kelley 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 ANYL 53. Microengineered tools for advancing preclinical and clinical research. N.L. Allbritton 4:00 ANYL 54. Dynamic profiling of anti-tumor immune response at the single-cell resolution by droplet microfluidic cell pairing. T. Konry 4:30 ANYL 55. Transient absorption microscopy for single cell analysis: Seeing chromophores that do not fluorescence. J. Cheng 5:00 ANYL 56. Multiplex single-cell detection of cytokines by barcoded microarray method. M. Abdullah, J. Wang

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Paper Devices for Bioanalysis M. R. Lockett, Organizer C. Mace, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 57. Innovating beyond the test strip for paper diagnostics. A.A. Kumar 2:05 ANYL 58. Paper-based cultures to screen for drug resistance and hormone sensitivity. M.R. Lockett 2:35 ANYL 59. Merging electronic bacteria with paper. S. Choi 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 ANYL 60. Probing tumour-stroma interactions and the impact of matrix density using paper-based TRACER culture. A.P. McGuigan, T. Dean, D. Rodenhizer, L. Ailles 3:50 ANYL 61. Lab-on-paper: Designing paper-based diagnostic devices for translation and automation. F.W. Kimani, M. Fratzl, B.S. Chang, B.J. Kwasa, N.M. Dempsey, T. Ward, J. Bloch, M.M. Thuo 4:20 ANYL 62. Electrochemical quantification of potassium on paper-based devices. D. Wilkins, I.A. Taylor, F. Deiss 4:50 ANYL 63. Paper-based devices for biothiols sensing using the photochemical reduction of silver halides. D. Christodouleas, D. Giokas 5:20 ANYL 64. Design of SERS nanotags for the multiplexed detection of dengue and zika in lateral flow assay. M. Sánchez-Purrà, M. Carre-Camps, H. de Puig, I. Bosch, L. Gehrke, K. Hamad-Schifferli

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡ N. Fang, Organizer G. Wang, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 65. Single-molecule imaging of nanocatalytic dynamics. P. Chen 1:55 ANYL 66. Measuring the nanometer-scale effects of plasmonic coupling with single-molecule microscopy. J.S. Biteen 2:20 ANYL 67. Catalysis and spectroscopy of single nanoparticle. X. Zhou, Y. Du, T. He, S. Xi, W. Wang 2:40 ANYL 68. In situ visualization of electrocatalytic reaction activity at quantum dots for water oxidation. Y. Chen, D. Jiang, J. Zhu 2:55 ANYL 69. Watching carbon fixation on a plasmonic catalyst nanoparticle. P.K. Jain 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 ANYL 70. Quantitative single-molecule and single particle study of catalytic reaction kinetics in versatile nanoconfinement under Operando condition. B. Dong, N. Fang, Y. Pei, W. Huang 4:00 ANYL 71. Revealing the effect of quantum size confinement on nanocatalysis at single cluster level. W. Xu 4:20 ANYL 72. Monitoring the dynamic photocatalytic activity of single CdS nanoparticles by fluorescently labeling H2 nanobubbles. H. Su, Y. Fang, F. Chen, W. Wang

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Student Organized Symposia: Supramolecular Analytical Chemistry Cosponsored by YCC Financially supported by ACS Sensor; College of Arts & Science, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the University of Alabama; ISS, Inc. M. Ihde, X. Liang, J. Tropp, Y. Xu, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 73. Lipid detection by a multi-component fluorescent sensor system. M. Xu, C.W. Littlefield, T.E. Glass 2:05 ANYL 74. Investigation into the mechanochemical properties of single artificial molecular switches by AFM. D. Sluysmans, S. Hubert, F. Devaux, C.J. Bruns, Z. Zhu, A. Duwez, J.F. Stoddart 2:25 ANYL 75. Improving affinity and solubility of supramolecular receptors in aqueous media using dendritic scaffolds. M. Bonizzoni 2:55 ANYL 76. Supramolecular approaches to targeting, sensing, and treating solid tumors. J.L. Sessler 3:25 Intermission. 3:35 ANYL 77. Supramolecular receptors for anions: Emerging applications in industrial and agricultural sensing. S.A. Fontenot, D.H. Banning, J. Lohrman, H.A. Fargher, L.M. Eytel, M.M. Haley, D.W. Johnson 4:05 ANYL 78. Confinement of water pentamers within the crystals of a reduced cyclotribenzoin. M.A. Alrayyani, X. Wang, O. Miljanic 4:25 ANYL 79. Construction of an autonomously concatenated hybridization chain reaction for signal amplification and intracellular imaging. J. Wei, F. Wang 4:45 ANYL 80. Supramolecular chemistry of interfaces: Dynamic droplet sensors. T.M. Swager 5:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Student Organized Symposia: Preparative Mass Spectrometry: Recent Advances & Applications Cosponsored by YCC P. Su, Organizer, Presiding H. Hu, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 81. Model cluster catalysis and electrocatalysis by size-selected cluster deposition. T.J. Gorey, A.C. Cass, G. Li, E.T. Baxter, S.L. Anderson 2:00 ANYL 82. High-coverage deposition of mass-selected cluster anions: Fundamentals and applications. J. Laskin, P. Su, V. Prabhakaran, G.E. Johnson, J. Warneke 2:30 ANYL 83. Preparation of model nanocatalysts using size-selected cluster deposition. M.G. White, M. Xue, K. Goodman, Y. Ma, J. Wang 3:00 ANYL 84. Dynamics of protonated dialanine adsorption on and desorption from a F-SAM surface. W.L. Hase

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

10:10 Intermission. 10:20 ANYL 28. Simple sensor arrays for not-so-simple analyses. P. Anzenbacher 10:50 ANYL 29. The Hofmeister and inverse Hofmeister effects. B.C. Gibb 11:20 ANYL 30. Conjugated polyelectrolytes as supramolecular sensing materials. K.S. Schanze, Z. Li, Y. Huang 11:50 Concluding Remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL 3:30 ANYL 85. Molecular properties of clusters determine the bulk behavior of cluster films. G.E. Johnson, J. Warneke, J. Laskin, V. Prabhakaran, A. Federov 4:00 ANYL 86. In situ infrared and electrochemistry approach for studying the structural evolution of soft-landed ions at electrochemical interfaces. P. Su, V. Prabhakaran, G.E. Johnson, J. Laskin

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Nanoelectroanalytical Chemistry for Biological & Material Sciences S. Amemiya, Organizer, Presiding A. Boika, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 87. Boron-doped diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon: Next-generation electrodes for electroanalysis. G. Swain 2:10 ANYL 88. AC polarized microelectrodes as a novel tool for electroanalysis: Collisions and more. A. Boika, J.A. Bonezzi, A. Frkonja-Kuczin, Z. Zhao 2:45 ANYL 89. Nanoemulsions for biomedical/ electrochemical application: A comprehensive study on the nanostructural effect. J. Kim 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 ANYL 90. Quantitation with differential scanning ion conductance microscopy. L.A. Baker 4:10 ANYL 91. Studying acetylcholine neurotransmission at single synapse with nanoelectrodes. M. Shen 4:45 ANYL 92. Nanoscale scanning electrochemical microscopy for overcoming limitations of microscale electroanalysis. S. Amemiya

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in honor of Professor Guibin Jiang Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Environmental Nanometrology Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

SETAC-ENVR Joint Symposium: Legacy & Emerging Organic Contaminants in the Great Lakes, Seas & Oceans Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Analytical Division Poster Session L. A. Baker, Organizer 7:00 – 9:00 ANYL 93. Novel signal amplifiable mercury detection method based on DNA conjugated upconversion nanoparticles. A. Nanattuchirayil Vijayan, P. Zhang ANYL 94. Characterization of the non-covalent interactions between poly (styrene sulfonate) and peptides using multistage tandem mass spectrometry. B. Wei, S. Gerislioglu, M. Atakay, B. Salih, C. Wesdemiotis ANYL 95. A disposable label-free amperometric immunosensor based on poly (vinyl alcohol-co-ethylene) nanofibers for detecting residual antibiotics in foods. A. El-Moghazy, C. Zhao, Y. Si, N. Amaly, G. Sun ANYL 96. Electrochemical monitoring of protein-driven silver nanoparticle dissolution. Z.J. O’Dell, D. Boehmler, K. Wheeler, K.R. Riley ANYL 97. Biosenors printed on paper and embedded with functional nanoparticle assemblies for human performance monitoring. S. Yan, C.S. Soni, B.L. Perris, S.E. Ruiz, C.L. Ghazvini, J. Lombardi, J. Luo, B.S. Hsiao, M.D. Poliks, C. Zhong

90

ANYL 98. Low-voltage driven portable paper bipolar electrode-supported electrochemical sensing device. C. Wang, W. Liao ANYL 99. Highly sensitive non-enzymatic lactate biosensor driven by porous nanostructured nickel oxide. K. Sungjin, W. Yang, H. Kim, Y. Park, H. Lee, S. Seo ANYL 100. Developing tools for high resolution mass spectrometry-based screening via the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard. A. McEachran, K. Mansouri, H. AlGhoul, C. Grulke, J. Sobus, A.J. Williams ANYL 101. Synthesis and characterization of pyridine carboxaldehydes Schiff bases and derivatives and their applications as chemical sensors. M.K. Hussein, Y.M. Hijji ANYL 102. On-line detection of Ag nanoparticles released from household water purification filters by electrodialyzersingle particle ICP-MS. F. Lin, C. Chang, L. Yi-hung, I. Hsu ANYL 103. Construction of low-cost biamperometry microscale equipment with local materials for Karl Fischer water titration. F.J. Olvera-Garcia, A.D. García Mendoza, A. De Santiago-Zárate, A. Baeza Reyes ANYL 104. Electrochemical reactions at microelectrode arrays. N. Siepser, B. Choi, S. Jeong, X. Ye, L.A. Baker ANYL 105. Immuno-capture laser ionization mass spectrometry: Gold and silver nanoparticles as mass tags for high mass protein imaging. Y. Cheng, T. Tam, S. Chau, S. Lai, K. Ng ANYL 106. Comparison of stirbar sorptive and liquid extraction techniques via volatile analysis of blood orange fruit pulp. B. Gates, A. Tucker, R. Weiland ANYL 107. Identification of the decarboxylated analog of Pigment Red 57 and its quantification in the color additives D&C Red Nos. 6 and 7 using UHPLC. M. Perez-Gonzalez, C.D. Ridge, A. Weisz ANYL 108. Preparation of a new graphene based biosensor modified with nanoparticles and nafion for the detection of glucose. D. Akin ANYL 109. Hydrazine functionalized probes for chromogenic and fluorescent ratiometric sensing of pH and F- through experimental and theoretical studies. A. Roy Chowdhury, P. Banerjee ANYL 110. High throughput and micro-scale purification of mucins. W.W. Wu, J. Phue, S. Yang, J.F. Cipollo, G. Zou, T. Ju, R. Shen ANYL 111. Synthesis, optimization, and bioconjugation of electrochemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles to induce irreversible damage to Glioblastoma invasive rim cells. M.A. Tovar, L.C. Giancarlo ANYL 112. Electrochemical detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a biosensor based on poly-adenine tailed DNA probe. L. Li, Y. Li, Y. Wen, L. Wang, W. Liang, X. Yang, J. Meng, M. Duan, M. Ding, G. Liu ANYL 113. Absolute quantitation of cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, and lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol using HILIC based separation coupled to a Q Exactive Plus mass spectrometer. E.D. Tague, J. Harp, B. Woodall, E. Fozo, S.R. Campagna ANYL 114. Controllable design of polycrystalline synergistic electrochemical biosensors for antineoplastic drug in mammalian cells. H. Zhou, J. Masson, Q. Song ANYL 115. Electrochemical sensor for sensitive and selective detection of liver cancer cells based on folic acid and octadecylamine functionalized graphene aerogel. R. Li ANYL 116. Liquid extraction through nanopipette probes for mass spectral analysis. G. Jagdale, N. Siepser, L.A. Baker ANYL 117. Optical fiber based localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor prepared by self-assembled gold nanoparticles on block copolymer monolayer. M. Lu, H. Zhu, C. Bazuin, W. Peng, J. Masson ANYL 118. A novel reverse polarity negative ion mode capillary isoelectric focusing - Mass spectrometry method for the separation and online characterization of glycosaminoglycan. H. Xiaorui, R.J. Linhardt ANYL 119. Detection and characterization of dopamine dynamically using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. J. Reyes Morales, N.M. Rivera Serrano, C. Fuster, L. Cunci ANYL 120. Protein adsorption on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. A. Misiura, N. Moringo, C. Dutta, H. Shen, C.F. Landes ANYL 121. Structural analysis and potential applications of non-anticoagulant heparin. O. Yilan, R.J. Linhardt, F. Zhang ANYL 122. An enzymatic electrochemical biosensor for real-time nicotine detection. U. Kuzmanovic, M. Chen, M.A. Tararina, N.S. Shu, A. Balijepalli, M. Zamani, A. Fan, C. Klapperich, K.N. Allen, M.W. Grinstaff, J. Galagan ANYL 123. Optimizing subsecond guanosine detection using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. M.T. Cryan, A.E. Ross

ANYL 124. Effect of relative humidity on the phase and chemical properties of cis-3-hexenyl acetate derived secondary organic aerosol. K.B. Fischer, G. Petrucci ANYL 125. Fast determination of β-cyclodextrin-Guest binding constants by fluorescence spectroscopy approach. X. Zhou ANYL 126. Development of a sandwich-typed assay for nucleic acids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering. R. Ota, A. Kobori ANYL 127. Melanin extraction and concentration analysis from Dumetella carolinensis feathers. J. Esposito, W.B. Hammert, R. Smith, M. Hatch, K.A. Stumpo ANYL 128. Esterification of phosphonic acids in organic matrices for their enhanced detection by EI-GCMS. C.A. Valdez, R.N. Leif ANYL 129. Methylation of phosphonic acids related to nerve agents and their subsequent analysis by EI-GC-MS and GCFPD. C.A. Valdez, R.N. Leif, S. Hok, A. Alcaraz ANYL 130. Highly sensitive, colorimetric, paper-based devices for the detection of nitrate in marine ocean environments. T. Mako, J. Racicot, M. Levine ANYL 131. Cobalt oxide multiwalled carbon nanotube composites for dopamine sensing. M. Kader, C. Chusuei ANYL 132. Colorimetric BRCA1 detection based on a 3D DNA nanostructured reporter probe. Y. Wen, Y. Li, L. Li, X. Yang, L. Wang, W. Liang, M. Ding, G. Liu ANYL 133. Modification of cellulose with cyclodextrin derivatives for solid state detection of toxicants. J. Racicot, T. Mako, M. Levine ANYL 134. Construction and characterization of solid-state sensors based on tungsten oxides used for the determination of acidity in dairy samples. D.V. Gutiérrez Núñez, A.d. García Mendoza, J.C. Aguilar, A. Baeza Reyes ANYL 135. Surface-enhanced Raman detection of glucose on different substrates for biosensing applications. L. Alqarni ANYL 136. Chemiluminescent aptasensor capable of rapidly sensing prostate-specific antigen in human serum using a dual-aptamer and paramagnetic bead. K. Kim, M. Kim, P. Park, J. Lee ANYL 137. Cost-effective and easy-to-use biosensor capable of rapidly sensing MicroRNA-25 for the early diagnosis of human cancer. P. Park, K. Kim, M. Kim, J. Lee ANYL 138. Simultaneous analysis of sugar components in 18F-FDG injection as their PMP derivatives by high performance liquid chromatography on a UV detector. R.N. Nair, A. Lebedev ANYL 139. Double chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassays capable of simultaneously quantifying CA 19-9 and CEA in a sample. Y. Lee, H. Moon, J. Lee ANYL 140. Electrochemiluminescence DNA biosensor for Hg(II) based on the catalysis of MoS2-Au-hemin nanocomposites and the signal amplification of luminol. T. Kang ANYL 141. Chemiluminescent biosensor for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer utilizing two distinct biomarkers. J. Chong, J. Lee ANYL 142. Positive feedback and theory in hot-tip scanning electrochemical microscopy. Z. Zhao, A. Boika ANYL 143. Investigations in magnesium battery technology. B. Basanty, S. Cora, N. Sa ANYL 144. Control membrane fouling in membrane distillation. M. Humoud ANYL 145. Instrumental analysis of methyl salicylate, both commercially and experimentally derived. M. Pizana, H. Price, J.R. Cole ANYL 146. Enhanced detection of lead and arsenic using electrokinetic techniques coupled with stripping voltammetry. J.A. Bonezzi, A. Hohenshil, A. Boika ANYL 147. Targeted metabolomics reveals altered fatty acid metabolism in the host by Huanglongbing disease. J. Suh, Y. Niu, Z. Wang, F. Gmitter, Y. Wang ANYL 148. Analysis and identification of ppb levels of VOC’s in ambient air via GC-PID-FID. J.N. Driscoll, J.L. Maclachlan ANYL 149. Determination of benzocaine concentrations in aqueous solutions using carbon screen-printed electrodes and cyclic voltammetry. D.E. Martyn, S.K. Buehler ANYL 150. Distributed Pharmaceutical Analysis Laboratory (DPAL): Metformin analyzed via HPLC. M. Alamgir, B. Boleslav, R.E. Goacher ANYL 151. Density, conductivity, and viscosity of 1-ethyl3-methylimidazolium methylphosphonate ionic liquid and the effect of adding molecular liquids. M. Thakurathi, V. Thalangamaarachchige, E.L. Quitevis ANYL 152. Detection and characterization of ZnO nanoparticles in seawater using SP-ICPMS coupled with electrodialyzer. I. Hsu, Y. Liu, F. Lin

ANYL 181. Using isotope substitution to study hightemperature vapor-phase chemical pathways. D. Weisz ANYL 182. A rapid and economical analytical method for the quantification of H2O2 in industrial treated effluents. A. Ghauch, O.N. Tantawi, A. Baalbaki, R. El Asmar ANYL 183. Terahertz multispectral reconstructive imaging of nanomaterials with sub-nanometer resolution. A. Rahman ANYL 184. Cellulose nano-composites nanostructure characterized by terahertz reconstructive imaging and spectroscopy. A. Rahman, K. Nelson, D. Afzal, M. Parvin ANYL 185. Chemically modified cellulose nano-composites for strong UV reflection and hydrophobicity. D. Afzal, M. Parvin, A. Rahman ANYL 186. Terahertz vibrational mode imaging of molecules in real-time. S.R. Kothapalli, A. Dangi, S. Agrawal, G.R. Datta, A.K. Rahman, A. Rahman ANYL 187. Self-standing aptamers by an artificial defect-rich matrix. C. Chen, W. Liao ANYL 188. Highly sensitive bio-recognition of cancer cells based on biosynthesized nanoclusters. X. Wang ANYL 189. Second harmonic generation microscopy of API nucleation and growth. S. Sarkar, G.J. Simpson ANYL 190. Cardboard, string, and a hacksaw: Productive no-cost modifications to open-bed autosamplers. S. Tentarelli ANYL 191. Dual-emissing carbon dots-based nanothermometers. H. Tantan ANYL 192. Novel electrochemical microfluidic chip for multicomponent analysis in renal function examination. Y. Li, J. Liu ANYL 193. Rapid detection of enzymes, viruses, and bacteria using glucose meters. A. Das, V. Chivukula, S.S. Iyer ANYL 194. Determination of zinc oxide in sunscreen using ion chromatography with visible absorbance detection. H. Yang ANYL 195. Determination of gentamicin and related impurities in gentamicin sulfate. J. Hu, J. Rohrer ANYL 196. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test based on large-volume light scattering microscopy. M. Mo ANYL 197. Development of infrared library search prefilters for automotive clear coats from simulated attenuated total reflection spectra. B.K. Lavine, U. Perera, K. Nishikida ANYL 198. Structural base analysis of production and purification of human leukemia Interferon. Y.S. Ting ANYL 199. In-situ growth of well-ordered NiFe-MOF-74 on Ni foam by Fe2+ induction as an efficient and stable electrocatalyst for water oxidation. C. Xu ANYL 200. V2O5 nanosheets as nanozyme with peroxidaselike activity for rapid and sensitive detection of glutathione. A.B. Ganganboina, R. Doong ANYL 201. Single-nucleotide polymorphism detection via ultrathin-film field-effect transistors. K.M. Cheung, J.M. Abendroth, N. Nakatsuka, B. Zhu, Y. Yang, A.M. Andrews, P.S. Weiss ANYL 202. Metabolic mechanism of cysteine-protected fluorescent gold nanoclusters in Escherichia coli. T. Chang, K. Chen, S. Tan, J. Kuo, X. Pan, T. Kuo ANYL 203. Non-fouling, encoded hydrogel particles for multiplex microRNA profiling directly from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue. M.B. Nagarajan, A. Tentori, W. Zhang, F. Slack, P.S. Doyle ANYL 204. Development of an electrochemical detection system for CpG methylation of human genome using methyl CpG binding domain and zinc finger protein. J. Lee, W. Yoshida, D. Hiraoka, A. Tatsumi, K. Abe, K. Nakabayashi, H. Wakeda, K. Hata, C. Marquete, L.J. Blum, K. Sode, K. Ikebukuro ANYL 205. Multiplex microRNA assays from raw cells in isolated nanoliter well arrays. A.M. Tentori, M.B. Nagarajan, J. Kim, W. Zhang, F. Slack, P.S. Doyle

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS X. Xu, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 ANYL 206. Controlling cellular architecture and fate with nanopatterned substrates. C.A. Mirkin 8:30 ANYL 207. Biomimetic nanoparticles and cellular functions. N. Kotov 9:00 ANYL 208. Investigation of chemical constituents responsible for PM2.5 induced oxidative stress using synthesized carbon black nanoparticles. K. Zhao, L. Guo

9:30 ANYL 209. Quantifying the cellular uptake and subcellular distributions of nanoparticles. Y. Xia 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 ANYL 210. Stimuli-responsive control of gold nanoparticle cellular uptake using host-guest interactions. J. Mosquera Mosquera, M. Henriksen-Lacey, I. García, M. Martínez-Calvo, J. Rodríguez, J.L. Mascarenas, L. Liz Marzan 10:40 ANYL 211. 3D single particle tracking discloses diffusion modes on solid supported lipid bilayer. Y. Zhong, G. Wang 11:10 ANYL 212. Big data from little objects: Omics results from nanoparticle/cell systems. C.J. Murphy 11:40 ANYL 213. Detection and characterization of single polymer nanoparticles with surface plasmon resonance imaging microscopy. A. Maley, B. Matthews, R.M. Corn

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡ G. Wang, Organizer N. Fang, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 ANYL 214. Monitoring the interactions of small organic molecules at lipid membrane interfaces. P.S. Cremer 9:25 ANYL 215. Spectrally resolved and functional super-resolution microscopy via ultrahigh-throughput singlemolecule spectroscopy. K. Xu 9:50 ANYL 216. Single-molecule imaging methods to understand the kinetics of three-component DNAhybridization systems. E.M. Peterson, W. Li, M.W. Manhart, F.D. Morris, J.M. Harris 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 ANYL 217. Tracking molecules and nanoparticles to probe confined environments. D.K. Schwartz 10:55 ANYL 218. Spectroscopic single molecule tracking and related methods for probing the local dielectric properties of nanomaterials. D.A. Higgins, D. Giri, R. Kumarashinghe, Z. Li, H. Xu, M.M. Collinson, T. Ito 11:20 ANYL 219. Surface diffusion of nanocar molecules disclosed by single molecule fluorescence microscopy. T. Jin, V. García-López, J.M. Tour, G. Wang 11:35 ANYL 220. Protein dynamics on the stimuliresponsive nanogel surface and inside nano-cavities. C. Dutta, A. Misiura, N. Moringo, C.F. Landes

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Wearable & Implantable Sensors M. A. Daniele, L. Deravi, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 221. A wearable colorimetric dosimeter to prevent UV-induced skin damages. J. Wang, A. Jeevarathinam, J.V. Jokerst 8:55 ANYL 222. Natural light-scattering nanoparticles enable visible through short-wave infrared color modulation. A. Kumar, R.M. Osgood, L. Deravi 9:15 ANYL 223. UV/sun exposure monitoring using a wearable sensor made of nanocellulose. E. MoralesNarváez 9:45 ANYL 224. Sensing electronics on ultra-thin nanocellulose sheets. J.D. Yuen, S. Walper, D. Zabetakis, M.A. Daniele, B. Ratna, D.A. Stenger 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 ANYL 225. Protein-based hydrogel as a material for actuating a jointed scaffold. C.M. Gomes, C. Liu, S.M. Felton, L. Deravi 10:50 ANYL 226. A biomimetic coating for intracutaneous sensors and devices. R. Parker, A. Trent, M. VanDyke, T. Zarkovic Grove 11:20 ANYL 227. Rapid prototyping of bioinspired materials for biosensing. Y. Chan, A. Hosseini, M. Skreta, H. McPhee, J. Yang, M. Hasan, L. Soleymani

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Nanozymes for Bioanalysis H. Wei, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 228. Nanozymes: Enzymatic activities, catalytic mechanisms and extensive applications in biomedicine. X. Yan

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL 153. Establishing baseline sensitivity data using LCMS/MS to investigate dermal in-vitro absorption toxicological application: Applications in analytical chemistry. A.H. Patel, P. Trivedi, N.A. Khan ANYL 154. Electrochemical sensor for diethylstilbestrol based on magnetic imprinted nanoparticles. T. Kang ANYL 155. Photocatalytic water-splitting BiVO4 incorporated in various biomass-derived scaffolds. A. Basurrah, D. Nde, W. Zhao ANYL 156. Electrochemical paper-based devices for oral preventative care through pH sensing. A. Metangmo, R. Barron, F. Deiss ANYL 157. Selectivity characterization of five achiral stationary phases using supercritical fluid and hydrophilic interaction chromatography. E.G. Franklin, M. Wilcox, G. Lowden, T. Szczerba ANYL 158. Evaluating DNA oxidation caused by e-cigarette and cigarette smoke: Using 3-D printed ECL arrays and LCMS. T.K. Nipuni, A. Ghosh, M. Shen, T. Keyes, J. Rusling ANYL 159. Monitoring the response of epithelial cells to drug molecules with potentiometric-scanning ion conductance microscopy. K. Huang, J. Hou, L.A. Baker ANYL 160. Formation of biofilm microenvironment in microfluidic system for investigating antimicrobial materials. J. Son, W. Kim, S. Kim, H. Cho, E. Cho, J. Jeon ANYL 161. Sensor fusion for biological imaging. J. Askim, S. Semancik ANYL 162. Real-time biosensor capable of quantifying triple biomarkers for diagnosing diabetes. E. Park, B. Kim, J. Lee ANYL 163. Manganese oxide nanosheets on quartz crystal microbalance for detection of methylmercaptan gas. Y. Tokura, G. Nakada, Y. Oaki, H. Imai, S. Shiratori ANYL 164. Enhanced detection of methylmercaptan gas using proton containing layered manganese oxide nanosheets coated on quartz crystal microbalance. N. Kawamura, Y. Tokura, G. Nakada, Y. Oaki, H. Imai, S. Shiratori ANYL 165. Conformational behaviour and molecularity of novel anti-IgM G-quadruplex forming aptamers. F. Moccia, D. Musumeci, C. Platella, J. Bradshaw, P. Mallikaratchy, D. Montesarchio ANYL 166. Prediction of polybrominated diphenyl ether retention times via Ab Iniitio calculations. A. Izydorczak, S. Simpson ANYL 167. Development of a robust capillary electrophoresis methodology for direct quantification of free doxorubicin in liposomal doxorubicin formulations in plasma. M. Mohamed Ansar, T. Mudalige ANYL 168. Tunable chemical sensing interfaces using dendronized nanoparticles coupled with nanofibrous paper substrates. S. Yan, B.L. Perris, C.S. Soni, S.E. Ruiz, C.L. Ghazvini, J. Lombardi, J. Luo, B.S. Hsiao, S. Lu, M.D. Poliks, I.G. Ivanov, C. Zhong ANYL 169. A correlated optical and electrochemical approach to probing electrocatalysis at individual nanostructures. P. Saha, J. Walmsley, J. Hill, C.M. Hill ANYL 170. Self-powered, wireless continuous glucose sensing system based direct electron transfer. I. Lee, N. Loew, W. Tsugawa, K. Ikebukuro, K. Sode ANYL 171. New sensing scheme based on magnetic relaxation to detect DNA. R. Nogueira e Silva, P. Zhang ANYL 172. Analysis of lipid binding to gold nanoparticle from lipid vesicles. X. Zhang, C.J. Murphy ANYL 173. SERS detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds through β-cyclodextrin modified Au nanoparticles. Z. Yu, H. Sorensen, M. Grasso, P. Zhang ANYL 174. Effects of nanoparticle size and shape on cellular uptake: A single particle approach. J. Hill ANYL 175. Analysis of ethyl glucuronide in oral fluid using LC-MS/MS and DART-TOFMS with SPME pre-concentration. K. Romano-Pringle, J.F. Morrison, C.M. Selavka ANYL 176. Direct analysis by HR-CS GF-AAS. An easy way to fast and accurate results. M. Schneider, H. Cadorim, L. Da Rocha, B. Welz ANYL 177. Nanoparticle-enhanced biosensors: amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide and biomarkers. M. Kozma, J. Li, S. Yan, S. Shan, A. Koh, C. Zhong ANYL 178. Aptamer-based field-effect transistor nanobiosensor arrays for the simultaneous detection of neurotransmitters. L.K. Heidenreich, L. Scarabelli, K. Yang, M. Stojanovic, P.S. Weiss, A.M. Andrews ANYL 179. Noble metal nanoparticles-based protein microarray. Y. Cheung, T. Tam, Y. Cheng, K. Ng ANYL 180. Biphasic-scanning ion conductance microscopy (BP-SICM). L.A. Baker, M. Choi

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL 9:05 ANYL 229. Bioorthogonal chemistry for imaging and therapeutics using engineered nanoparticle ‘nanozymes’. V.M. Rotello 9:35 ANYL 230. Surface modified nanozymes as biosensors. J. Liu 10:00 ANYL 231. Point of care bioassay system based on enzyme-mimetic nanomaterials. J. Lee 10:25 ANYL 232. Peroxidase-mimicking microgels fabricated by encapsulation of ionic nanoparticles and their applications in biomarker detection. W. Zhong, Y. Liu, Q. Jiang 10:50 ANYL 233. Metal nanomaterials with enzymes like activities for quantitation of small analytes. H. Chang 11:15 ANYL 234. Catalytic nanomaterials for amplified biosensing. C. Loynachan, M. Thomas, E. Gray, D. Richards, V. Chudasama, R. McKendry, M. Stevens 11:35 ANYL 235. Metal-organic frameworks in biomimetic applications. M. Xu, Z. Gu

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Chemical Forensics

10:35 ANYL 252. Effect of fluoroethylene carbonate electrolytes on the nanostructure of the solid electrolyte interphase and performance of lithium metal anodes. Z. Brown, S. Jurng, B.L. Lucht 11:05 ANYL 253. Applications of environmental TEM in energy materials. J. Li 11:35 ANYL 254. A new family of sulfonimide salts: Structure-property relationships for battery application. S. Feng, M. Huang, Z. Wenxu, L. Giordano, J.A. Johnson, Y. Shao-Horn

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in honor of Professor Guibin Jiang Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB

C. Fraga, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 ANYL 236. Analytical chemistry in support of investigations of alleged use. M. Blum 8:25 ANYL 237. Sampling for chemical weapons in hostile environments for forensic analysis. L. Phillips 8:45 ANYL 238. The role of chemical forensics research in the investigative process. R.l. Bull 9:00 ANYL 239. Comparison of targeted and non-targeted approaches in source attribution of sulphur mustard. R. Norlin, K. Höjer Holmgren, D. Wiktelius, A. Larsson, L. Ahlinder, C. Åstot 9:20 ANYL 240. Chemical profiling and source attribution of sulfur mustard. J. Riches, C. Timperley, W. Rebecca, S. Sarah 9:40 ANYL 241. Chemical attribution signature study on synthetic routes of VX. S. Hok, R.N. Leif, K.E. Mason, D. Mew, A. Vu, L. Carman 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 ANYL 242. Signatures of sarin exposure in authentic human samples. D. Noort, M. van der Schans 10:40 ANYL 243. Statistical analysis of the chemical attribution signatures of crude sarin. B.P. Mayer, S. Hok, C.A. Valdez, A.M. Williams 11:00 ANYL 244. Using stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) to source the nerve agent precursor methylphosphonic dichloride and its products. J. Moran, C. Fraga, M.K. Nims 11:20 ANYL 245. An overview of evidence evaluation methods in forensic chemistry using likelihood ratios. D. Ramos 11:40 ANYL 246. Adsorption and desorption study of a nerve-agent simulant from office materials for forensic applications. C. Fraga, O.M. Primera-Pedrozo, M. Zumbach, A. Breton- Vega, B.P. Wilkins

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles

SECTION F

Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS X. Xu, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 ANYL 255. Applications of nanosensors to understanding biochemical signaling within the human body. M. Strano 1:30 ANYL 256. On-a-chip bisosensing with optical nanoresonators. R. Quidant 2:00 ANYL 257. Biosensing devices-from single cell analysis to organ on a chip. C. Li 2:30 ANYL 258. Radioluminescent phosphors as local light sources within tissue: Opportunities and challenges for chemical sensing and control. J.N. Anker, G.B. Schober, M.J. Case, U. Uzair, M. Arifuzzaman, H. Chen, S. BeladiBehbahani, J. Tzeng 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 ANYL 259. Beyond biomarkers: Array-based profiling for diagnostics and geno- /phenotypic screening for precision medicine. V.M. Rotello 3:40 ANYL 260. Intracellular ion monitoring in neurons tracked by modular ratiometric nanosensors. G. Rong, E. Kim, H. Clark 4:00 ANYL 261. Monitoring single cell release of non-redox active gliotransmitters using electrochemical aptamer-based sensors. R.A. Lazenby, R.J. White 4:20 ANYL 262. Ultrabright fluorescent silica nanosensors for dual pH and temperature measurements. S. Peerzade, M. Miljkovic, I. Sokolov 4:40 ANYL 263. Nanopore-based biosensor for lead ion detection using a Cys4 zinc-finger motif. G. M Roozbahani, X. Guan, Y. Zhang

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Analysis of Materials for Energy Storage Cosponsored by ENFL N. Sa, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 ANYL 247. Interfacial characterizations on alumina coated cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. B. Han, B. Key, S.H. Lapidus, J.C. Garcia, H. Iddir, J.T. Vaughey, F. Dogan 8:30 ANYL 248. Aqueous zinc batteries. C. Wang, F. Wang, O. Borodin, T. Gao, X. Fan, W. Sun, F. Han, A. Faraone, J. Dura 9:00 ANYL 249. Toward stable Li-O2 battery operations using a water-in-salt electrolyte. D. Wang, Q. Dong, Y. Zhao, Y. He 9:30 ANYL 250. Increased cycling performance of Li-ion batteries by phosphoric acid modified LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes in the presence of LiBOB. M. Yapa Abeywardana, N. Laszczynski, M. Kuenzel, D. Bresser, S. Passerini, B.L. Lucht 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 ANYL 251. In-situ TEM observation on the correlation of electrochemical properties with structural and chemical evolution of electrode materials in rechargeable batteries. C. Wang

92

Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡ N. Fang, Organizer G. Wang, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 264. Imaging molecular conductance at optical frequencies in plasmonic molecules. B.M. Reinhard 1:55 ANYL 265. Single-molecule imaging in catalytic polymerization. S. Blum 2:20 ANYL 266. Plasmonic imaging of electrochemical and photochemical activity of single nanoparticles. W. Wang 2:45 Intermission. 3:00 ANYL 267. Nonclassical optics enabled imaging of single reactions. D. Han, K. Fu, G. Crouch, S. Kwon, P.W. Bohn 3:25 ANYL 268. Developing optical imaging techniques to measure the chemical reaction at single nanoparticle level. X. Shan 3:50 ANYL 269. Scanning angle and directional Raman measurements of the chemical composition and thickness of thin films. E.A. Smith, C. Nyamekye, S. Weibel, J.M. Bobbitt 4:15 ANYL 270. Three-dimensional mapping of optical near-field responses by controlling probe-sample distance. H. Wang, X. Xu

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Wearable & Implantable Sensors

MONDAY AFTERNOON

M. A. Daniele, L. Deravi, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 271. Ultrathin shell biosensors for 3D live cell studies. W. Xu, Q. Jin, D.H. Gracias 1:50 ANYL 272. Designer hydrogel ionic circuits for biologically-matched electronics. S. Zhao, F. Omenetto, D.L. Kaplan 2:10 ANYL 273. Electroactive protein-based actuators. L. Deravi 2:40 ANYL 274. Biodegradable piezoelectric force sensor. T. Nguyen, E. Curry 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 ANYL 275. Functional multilayer nanomeshes for advanced bio-recording and stimulating microelectrodes. H. Fang 3:55 ANYL 276. Hydrogel-based electronics: Ultracompliant electrodes for neural interfaces and beyond. C.J. Bettinger 4:25 ANYL 277. Additive manufacturing of ingestible gastric resident biomedical electronics. Y. Kong

SECTION A

SECTION D

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

Fate & Metabolism of Xenobiotics: In Vitro & In Silico Studies Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and CEI

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier

Nanozymes for Bioanalysis H. Wei, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 278. Nanoenzymes for analytical applications. I. Willner 2:00 ANYL 279. Peptide-conjugated gold nanoprobe:intrinsic nanozyme-linked immunsorbant assay of integrin expression level on cell membrane. L. Gao, X. Gao 2:30 ANYL 280. Nanoceria antioxidative mimetic enzymes. S. Seal, W. Self, K. Liechty, P. Brenneisen 2:55 ANYL 281. Biomimetic NanoZyme sensors: From environmental to clinical diagnostics. V. Bansal, R. Ramanathan, P. Weerathunge, N. Karim 3:20 ANYL 282. Ceria nanoparticles as nanoenzyme mimetics: Properties, assembly and bioanalytical applications. F. Mustafa, A.S. Finny, A. Othman, E. Andreescu 3:45 ANYL 283. Nucleotide-dependent tunable peroxidaselike activity of gold nanozymes for bioanalysis. M.V. Yigit, M. Hizir 4:10 ANYL 284. Metal nanocrystals as peroxidase mimics for biosensing applications. X. Xia 4:35 ANYL 285. Nanozymes for in vitro detection and live bioassays. H. Wei 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Chemical Forensics C. Fraga, Organizer, Presiding 1:15 Introductory Remarks.

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Analysis of Materials for Energy Storage Cosponsored by ENFL N. Sa, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 ANYL 296. Novel solid state battery electrolyte conductors, phase evolution and processing. J. Rupp 1:30 ANYL 297. Decipher electronic and structural evolution of lead-free perovskite using transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy. X. Zhang, C. Liu, K. Zheng, D.J. Gosztola, S. Canton 1:55 ANYL 298. Analysis of MXenes in electrochemical energy storage applications. M. Naguib, Y. Gogotsi 2:20 ANYL 299. Surface restructuring-induced catalytic reactivity of transition metal phosphide nanoparticles under electrochemical conditions. H. Wang 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 ANYL 300. Plasmonic nanowire and graphene for solar water splitting. C. Yang 3:20 ANYL 301. Structural dynamics of bismuth cathodes during the electrochemical reduction of CO2 in the presence of RTILs. J. Rosenthal 3:45 ANYL 302. IR and Raman spectroscopy of ionomers and ionomer/metal interfaces: An exchange site local symmetry approach. E.S. Smotkin, N. Loupe, D. Kumari, J.H. Doan, K. Mathiowetz, N. Dimakis 4:10 ANYL 303. Simultaneous probing of the copper/ electrolyte interface by surface-selective infrared spectroscopy and online electrochemical mass spectrometry. M. Waegele, X. Li, V. Ovalle, C. Gunathunge 4:35 ANYL 304. A Raman spectroscopic study of the anatase to rutile phase transition of TiO2 induced by photoexcitation of adsorbed dyes. D. Graf Stillfried, M.C. Foster

Environmental Behaviors & Health Effects of Pollutants: A Symposium in honor of Professor Guibin Jiang Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and GEOC

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development: New Trends & Best Practices Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

Environmental Health & Safety of Emerging Chemicals & Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and CEI

Undergraduate Research Posters Analytical Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by ANYL and SOCED

Microplastic Pollution: Sources, Sinks & Solutions Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and CEI

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix L. A. Baker, M. F. Bush, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 94-96, 101, 103-104, 107, 109, 114, 116-118, 120-124, 126-127, 130-131, 133-134, 138, 142, 144, 146-148, 150-151, 153, 155-156, 158-160, 166-170, 174-175, 178, 180. See previous listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Recent Advances in Solid Phase Extraction: Symposium in honor of Patrick D. McDonald Financially supported by Waters Corporation T. Walter, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 ANYL 305. Harnessing the power of solid phase extraction for peptide bioanalysis. M. Lame 8:30 ANYL 306. Solid phase extraction (SPE) in bioanalytical method development for therapeutic peptides. K. Lee 8:50 ANYL 307. Development, validation and application of a cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction for the determination of nanoparticle-released drug concentrations in plasma. C. Holliman, W. Song, J. Tweed, Z. Gu 9:10 ANYL 308. Recent advances in solid phase extraction for biological samples – Fulfilling the promise of SPE. J. Danaceau 9:30 ANYL 309. New developments in SPME. J.B. Pawliszyn 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 ANYL 310. Effective simplified SPE for modern multiresidue analysis: Recent developments for pass-through, dispersive, and retention/elution SPE. M.S. Young, K. Tran 10:35 ANYL 311. Lipid selective SPE materials simplify sample preparation and improve results. D. Lucas, B.E. Richter, L. Zhao 10:55 ANYL 312. Variability of solute-sorbent binding constants in SPE materials. D.E. Raynie, S. Pandey, S. Subedi, D. Lucas, B.E. Richter 11:25 ANYL 313. Porphyrin-based magnetic nanocomposites for efficient extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples. J. Yu, S. Zhu

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

11:05 ANYL 319. “Waltz” of Janus particles in cells: Unravelling cell functions with single-particle rotational tracking. Y. Yu 11:30 ANYL 320. Quantitative super-resolution microscopy reveals the architecture of the mammalian glycocalyx and its changes during cancer progression. L. Moeckl, K. Pedram, A. Roy, A. Gustavsson, C.R. Bertozzi, W.E. Moerner 11:50 ANYL 321. Semiconducting polymer nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging in the second near-infrared window. J. Wu, J. Mei, J. Cheng

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Wearable & Implantable Sensors M. A. Daniele, L. Deravi, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 322. Erythrocyte membrane-camouflaged sensor for continuous therapeutic drug monitoring. W. Di, X. Tan, M. Niedre, H. Clark 8:55 ANYL 323. Ultra-sensitive, highly-selective, realtime chemical wearable sensors based on hydrogel interferometer. M. Sun, M. Qin, R. Bai, J. Song, Y. Mao, H.J. Qi, Z. Suo, X. He 9:25 ANYL 324. Soft photonic sensors for quantifying oxygen in engineered human tissues. K. Rivera, N. Wisniewski, S.T. Magness, M.A. Daniele 9:45 ANYL 325. Mixed microdomains in hydrogels – strategies for multiplexed and multimode chemicallyresponsive materials. Y. You, L. Bornhoeft, A. Quinn, V. Baldock, S. Goerge, D. Kotturi, M. McShane 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 ANYL 326. Continuous monitoring of lung metabolites in exhaled breath condensate using reduced graphene oxide sensor. M. Javanmard 11:00 ANYL 327. Wearable and implantable biosensing technologies based on the direct electron transfer principle. K. Sode, N. Loew, I. Lee, Y. Ito, W. Tsugawa 11:30 ANYL 328. Toward and integrated microfluidicmicrosensor patch for analysis of dermal fluids. M. Yokus, V. Pozdin, A.T. Young, J. Dieffenderfer, T. Songkakul, A. Bozkurt, M.A. Daniele

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Structure & Function of 2D Materials Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS S. A. Claridge, Organizer S. Claridge, Presiding 9:00 ANYL 329. Hierarchically patterned noncovalent functionalization of 2D materials by controlled Langmuir– Schaefer conversion. T.C. Davis, J. Bang, J.T. Brooks, D.G. McMillan, S.A. Claridge 9:20 ANYL 330. Structural characterization of defects in hexagonal boron nitride using scanning probe spectroscopy. D. Kozawa, A. Rajan, V. Koman, K. Silmore, A. Liu, P. Liu, D. Parviz, M. Strano 9:40 ANYL 331. Chemically building atomically abrupt interfaces in 2D materials transition metal dichalcogenides. J. Johns 10:10 ANYL 332. Lateral heteroepitaxy in 2D metal-organic chalcogenolates. J. Hohman 10:40 ANYL 333. Properties and applications of covalently functionalized group 14 graphane analogues. J.E. Goldberger 11:10 ANYL 334. Highly sensitive and high-speed imaging of grain boundaries in graphene by transient absorption microscopy. C. Yang

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging

SECTION E

Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡ N. Fang, Organizer G. Wang, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 ANYL 314. Photostable optical nanoscopy (PHOTON) for cancer research. X. Xu, P. Songkiatisak, P. Cherukuri 9:25 ANYL 315. Stimulus-responsive molecular probes for imaging of disease targets. R.L. McCarley 9:50 ANYL 316. Plasmonic nanoparticles for single-cell imaging and in-situ sensing. J. Zhu 10:10 ANYL 317. Light-driven nano-oscillators for label-free single-molecule detection. Z. Chen 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 ANYL 318. Molecular imaging by using environmental sensitive flavonoid dyes: From protein binding to specific biological tissue recognition. Y. Pang

Nucleic Acid-Based Sensors

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106 K. Chow, M. You, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 ANYL 335. Quantitative imaging of immune cells. Y. Krishnan 8:40 ANYL 336. A DNA nanoscope via auto-cycling proximity recording. P.L. Yin 9:15 ANYL 337. DNA nanostructures and nanosensors. W. Tan 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 ANYL 338. Imaging and controlling cellular biology using genetically encoded RNA devices. S. Jaffrey 10:40 ANYL 339. Catalytic DNA biosensors for detecting metal ions. J. Liu

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

1:20 ANYL 286. Applications of the US EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard to support structure identification and chemical forensics using mass spectrometry. A.J. Williams, A. McEachran, J. Sobus, E. Schymanski 1:40 ANYL 287. Latest developments and applications of position-specific isotope analysis by NMR spectrometry. G. Remaud, V. Joubert, S. Akoka, M. Grand, V. Silvestre, B. Charrier 2:05 ANYL 288. Carbon stable isotope ratios from 13C satellite peaks in 1-D 1H NMR spectra. J.R. Cort, S. Colby 2:25 ANYL 289. Validation of forensic fire debris data interpretation. M. Sigman 2:45 ANYL 290. Establishing the relevance of chemical forensics methods. K. Jarman 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 ANYL 291. Chemical profiling of explosives to create new opportunities for forensic investigation and intelligence. M. Koeberg, K. Bezemer, P. Schoenmakers, A.v. Heijden, A.v. Asten 3:40 ANYL 292. Geographic sourcing of heroin using trace elements and strontium isotope ratios. J.R. Almirall, J. DeBord, A. Pourmand, S. Jantzi 4:00 ANYL 293. Authentication of edible food oils using raman spectroscopy. B.K. Lavine, F. Kwofie, I. Uba, M. Bamidele, K.S. Booksh, J. Ottaway 4:20 ANYL 294. Density-based separation of powdered mixtures using magnetic levitation simplifies sample preparation for spectroscopic analysis and enables rapid fingerprinting of adulterants in illicit drugs. C.K. Abrahamsson, G.M. Whitesides 4:40 ANYL 295. In-field electrochemical detection of chlorate for explosives assessment. K. Kukoyi, D. Wilkins, F. Deiss

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL 11:15 ANYL 340. Folding- and dynamics-based electrochemical metal ion sensors. R.Y. Lai

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Light-Nanomaterial Interactions for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Sensing & Imaging & Materials Chemistry S. Pan, Organizer C. M. Hill, Presiding 8:00 ANYL 341. Rapid screening of photoanode materials for solar water splitting and the study of Co doping effect on photoelectrochemical performance of BiVO4. P.S. Shinde, X. Peng, J. Wang, Y. Ma, L.E. McNamara, N. Hammer, A. Gupta, S. Pan 8:20 ANYL 342. Graphene quantum dots for electrochemiluminescence and light-emitting electrochemical cells. R. Zhang, J. Adsetts, S. He, L. Yang, M. Ly, Z. Ding 8:50 ANYL 343. Enhanced photocatalytic performance of CuFeO2 thin films grown by chemical vapor deposition. A. Yengantiwar, P.S. Shinde, S. Pan, A. Gupta 9:20 ANYL 344. Sub-particle photoelectrochemistry. P. Chen 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 ANYL 345. Developing nanomaterial-based strategies for creating signal-on and signal-off photoelectrochemical biosensors. L. Soleymani, A. Victorious, S. Saha 10:35 ANYL 346. Surface plasmon-driven water reduction: Nanoparticle size matters. W. Wei 11:05 ANYL 347. Probing electrocatalytic reactions at individual plasmonic nanostructures: A combined direct electrochemical and optical approach. C.M. Hill, P. Saha, J. Walmsley, J. Hill 11:35 ANYL 348. Photoelectrochemical investigations of semiconductor surfaces and catalyst interfaces for solar water splitting. S. Pan

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis Flow Synthesis Sponsored by COMSCI, Cosponsored by ANYL, COMP, MEDI and ORGN

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and GEOC

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) Bio-Accessibility & Potential Risks Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Analytical Division Awards L. A. Baker, Organizer K. Phinney, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 349. Will open tubular liquid chromatography ever catch on? P.K. Dasgupta 2:05 ANYL 350. Electrocatalytic cascades for energy conversion and electrosynthesis. S.D. Minteer 2:40 ANYL 351. The foundation of molecular medicine: A chemical biology approach. W. Tan 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 ANYL 352. Learning is not a spectator sport: Active learning in analytical chemistry. J.K. Robinson 4:05 ANYL 353. Advancing analytical chemistry through education, mentoring and inclusion. C.K. Larive 4:40 ANYL 354. Accelerated droplet chemistry: How and why? A. Badu-Tawiah

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Frontiers of Bioanalytical Raman Imaging & Spectroscopy D. Fu, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 355. Stimulated Raman cytometry: Unveiling dynamic signatures in single cells for precision diagnosis and treatment. J. Cheng

94

2:05 ANYL 356. Super-resolution Raman imaging to understand polymer-mediated gene delivery. D. Punihaole, R.R. Frontiera 2:25 ANYL 357. Sub-diffraction CARS imaging of plant cell wall. A. Singh, D. Freppon, O. Zabotina, J.W. Petrich, E.A. Smith 2:45 ANYL 358. Identifying cancer cells with multifunctional surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) probes. M. Li 3:05 Intermission. 3:35 ANYL 359. Super-multiplex vibrational imaging for biomedicine. W. Min 4:05 ANYL 360. Linear and nonlinear Raman spectroscopy for taking optical biopsies. M. Schmitt, J. Popp 4:35 ANYL 361. Spectral focusing multiphoton hyperspectral imaging with 5 cm-1 spectral resolution. A. Zeytunyan, T. Baldacchini, R. Zadoyan 4:55 ANYL 362. In vitro and in vivo neurochemical detection for early-onset neurological disease diagnosis with Raman spectroscopy. B. Sharma

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Wearable & Implantable Sensors M. A. Daniele, L. Deravi, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 363. Engineering textile-compatible sensors and signal lines for wearable robotics. V. Sanchez, C.J. Walsh 1:50 ANYL 364. Vapor phase chemistry for garmentintegrated electronics. T.L. Andrew 2:20 ANYL 365. Rehealable, fully recyclable and malleable electronic skin enabled by dynamic covalent thermoset nanocomposite. J. Xiao, Z. Zou, W. Zhang 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 ANYL 366. Chemiresistive sensors for low power applications. T.M. Swager 3:35 ANYL 367. A wearable sensor for real-time measurement of the chloride ion concentration in sweat: Relevance to health and disease. P. Searson, D. Choi, G. Kitchen 4:05 ANYL 368. Toward high performance gas sensing in wearable formats. R.A. Potyrailo 4:35 ANYL 369. Conductive metal-organic frameworks as sensors and transducers in portable electroanalytical devices. K. Mirica

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Structure & Function of 2D Materials Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS S. A. Claridge, Organizer S. Claridge, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 370. π-Electron functional materials in the flatland. D.F. Perepichka 2:00 ANYL 371. Standing, lying, and sitting: Controlling surface wetting and interactions between a 2D material and its environment using bioinspired noncovalent ligand layers. S.A. Claridge 2:30 ANYL 372. On the intrinsic electrochemical properties of graphitic materials. H. Liu 3:00 ANYL 373. Studies of friction, energy dissipation and chemical reactivity of 2D nanomaterials. M.B. Elinski, Z. Liu, M. Negrito, N. Hawthorne, J. Batteas 3:30 ANYL 374. The antimicrobial property of 2D materials. L. Yang 4:00 ANYL 375. Electrocatalysis on electronically transparent yet physically impermeable graphene electrodes. J. Hui, J. Rodriguez Lopez

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Nucleic Acid-Based Sensors K. Chow, M. You, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 376. High-throughput small-molecule enantiopurity measurement using flow cytometry. Z. Tan, A. Manna, J.M. Heemstra 2:00 ANYL 377. Rapid, sub-millisecond interrogation of conformation switching aptamers. R.J. White, M. Santos Cancel 2:30 ANYL 378. Quantifying intercellular tensile forces by membrane DNA probes. M. You, B. Zhao 3:00 ANYL 379. Ligand-guided selection (LIGS): A SELEX variant to identify specific aptamers against cell-surface markers. H. Zümrüt, S. Batool, K. Argyropoulos, R. Dekhang, P. Mallikaratchy 3:30 Intermission.

3:45 ANYL 380. Real-time, in-vivo feedback control of plasma drug levels guided by electrochemical, aptamerbased measurements. N. Arroyo 4:10 ANYL 381. Visualized aptamer biosensors based on coffee-ring effect. H. Liu 4:35 ANYL 382. Signal amplification based on isothermal autonomous nonlinear hybridization chain reactions. F. Wang, J. Wang 5:00 ANYL 383. Charge splitters and charge transport junctions based on guanine quadruplexes. R. Sha, L. Xiang, C. Liu, A. Balaeff, Y. Zhang, P. Zhang, Y. Li, D.N. Beratan, N. Tao, N.C. Seeman

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Light-Nanomaterial Interactions for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Sensing & Imaging & Materials Chemistry S. Pan, Organizer C. M. Hill, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 384. Scanning electrochemical microscopy meets Raman - In Situ and simultaneous probing of reactivity and electronic structure on single reacting sites. N. Schorr, Z. Gossage, J. Rodriguez Lopez 2:00 ANYL 385. Quantifying structure-specific plasmon mode quality factors using single-beam interferometric nonlinear optical microscopy. T. Zhao, K.L. Knappenberger 2:20 ANYL 386. Distinguishing structural isomers in singlemolecule junctions. H. Zhang 2:50 ANYL 387. Enhancing the fluorescence stability of CH3NH3PbI3 films under the blue excitation source. J. Yadav, S. Pan 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 ANYL 388. High-resolution imaging of single biological nanopores by scanning electrochemical microscopy. S. Amemiya 3:55 ANYL 389. Single nucleation and crystal growth by insitu electrochemical sensing and optical imaging. G. Wang, Y. Li, M.M. Kvetny 4:25 ANYL 390. Synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanomaterials from benzoxazine for multiple applications. J. Gu, B. Fang, X. Lu, F. Cao, X. Zheng 4:55 ANYL 391. Photoelectrochemical properties of p-Cuprous oxide nanoneedles/n-Titanium dioxide nanorods tandem cell for solar water splitting. S. Pan, N. Kaneza, P.S. Shinde

DARPA Make-It Program: Automating Small Molecule Route Design, Optimization & Synthesis Reaction Planning & Screening Sponsored by COMSCI, Cosponsored by ANYL, COMP, MEDI and ORGN

Novel Treatment Approaches for Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater Systems Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by AGRO‡, ANYL and GEOC

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS Z. Rosenzweig, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 ANYL 392. Anionic nanoparticles disrupt gramicidin A activity in model phospholipid bilayers. I. Foreman-Ortiz, E. Laudadio, J. Calderin, Y. Zhao, B. Gonzales, P. Keshri, X. Zhang, B. Cheng, X. Zhang, B. Hoover, V.M. Rotello, C.J. Murphy, R. Murphy, J.A. Pedersen 8:25 ANYL 393. Transient protein interaction with nanoparticle produces persistent conformational changes. K. Kim, X. Zhang, C.J. Murphy, J.A. Pedersen 8:45 ANYL 394. Effects of ionic environment on bacterial lipopolysaccharide monolayer structure. A. Rahnamoun, K. Kim, J.A. Pedersen, R. Hernandez 9:05 ANYL 395. High-precision non-fluorescent single particle tracking of monosaccharide conjugated gold nanoparticles on membranes. K. Chen, Y. Gu, N. Fang

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Frontiers of Bioanalytical Raman Imaging & Spectroscopy D. Fu, Organizer J. Cheng, Presiding 8:30 ANYL 400. Alkyne-tag Raman imaging for finding small molecules. K. Fujita 9:00 ANYL 401. Broadband stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopic imaging. D. Fu 9:30 ANYL 402. Confocal-Raman microscopy of phospholipid bilayers in small-volume, high surface area supports: An informative tool for investigating bilayer-analyte interactions. D. Bryce, J.P. Kitt, J.M. Harris 9:50 ANYL 403. Towards label-free super-resolution Raman imaging. C.T. Graefe, D. Punihaole, R.R. Frontiera 10:10 Intermission. 10:40 ANYL 404. Raman microscopy investigation of cytochrome c-cardiolipin interactions to understand the mechanism of cytochrome c-induced membrane permeabilization proposed to occur during apoptosis. J.P. Kitt, D.A. Bryce, S.D. Minteer, J.M. Harris 11:00 ANYL 405. Organic semiconductor based surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy platforms. G. Demirel, H. Usta, A. Facchetti 11:20 ANYL 406. Ultrahigh affinity radiolabeled Raman probes for combined SERS and PET/SPECT imaging of prostate cancer. S. Siddhanta, I. Barman 11:40 ANYL 407. Functionalized magnetic-plasmonic nanoprobes for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic detection of cancer biomarkers. J. Li, M. Kozma, J. Luo, S. Shan, S. Yan, Y. Liu, M.R. Hepel, C. Zhong 12:00 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Wearable & Implantable Sensors M. A. Daniele, L. Deravi, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 408. Nanoporous gold-based biosensor for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. J. Narayanan, G. Slaughter 9:05 ANYL 409. Single-molecule and interaction-based biosensing using nanopores: Oligo and polysaccharide analysis. B.I. Karawdeniya, J.W. Nichols, Y.D. Bandara, J. Hagan, R.B. Chevalier, J.R. Dwyer 9:35 ANYL 410. High throughput virtual screening of fullerene sensors: Designing a molecular clamp. J.M. Cox, S.A. Lopez 10:05 ANYL 411. Augmenting radiography with chemical sensors. J.N. Anker, M. Arifuzzaman, P. Millhouse, U. Wijayaratna, S. Kiridena, Y. Raval, C.J. Behrend, T. Pace, J. DesJardins, J. Tzeng 10:35 Intermission. 10:50 ANYL 412. Quasi-direct electron transfer-type glucose sensor based on engineered glucose oxidase. N. Loew, N. Suzuki, W. Tsugawa, Y. Inose-Takahashi, M. Hatada, K. Mori, K. Sode 11:10 ANYL 413. Calibration-free approaches to interrogate electrochemical aptamer-based sensors enable ultra-highprecision in-vivo drug monitoring. N. Arroyo 11:40 ANYL 414. Progress towards a wearable glucose sensor: Development of a versatile two-component system based on boronic acid appended viologens receptors. A. Resendez, B. Singaram

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Solid-Phase Chemoenzymatic Methods for Analysis of Sialylated Glycans & their Intact Glycopeptides Cosponsored by CARB Financially supported by Genovis Inc. S. Yang, Organizer, Presiding J. F. Cipollo, Presiding 8:30 ANYL 415. Characterization of site-specific glycosylation of aggrecan, a 2.5 megadalton hyalectan proteoglycan. J.A. Klein, L. Meng, J. Zaia 9:10 ANYL 416. Identification of sialic acid linkages on intact glycopeptides using intactGIG-HILIC. S. Yang 9:25 ANYL 417. Enzymatic strategies for O-glycan analysis using LC-MS. P. Onigman 9:40 ANYL 418. Deciphering protein o-glycosylation: Solidphase chemoenzymatic cleavage and enrichment. S. Yang, P. Onigman, J. Sjogren, H. Nyhlen, W.W. Wu, R. Shen, J.F. Cipollo 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 ANYL 419. The comprehensive glycomic characterization of the glycocalyx. C.B. Lebrilla 11:10 ANYL 420. Human serum IgG glycosylation as a promising biomarker for cancer diagnosis. S. Ren, Z. Zhang, R. Qin, W. Qin, J. Han, J. Gu 11:30 ANYL 421. Exploring receptor tyrosine kinase N-glycosylation and signaling via nanoLC-MS/MS using higher-energy collisional dissociation and stepped collision energy. K.B. Chandler, D.R. Leon, J. Kuang, M.A. Kukuruzinska, N. Rahimi, C.E. Costello 11:50 ANYL 422. Linkage-specific sialic acid derivatization strategies for mass spectrometric profiling of glycans and glycopeptides in complex samples and tissues. N. de Haan, S. Holst, G. Kammeijer, B. Heijs, D. Falck, K. Reiding, M. Wuhrer

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Nucleic Acid-Based Sensors K. Chow, M. You, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 ANYL 423. Genetically encoded RNA sensors for fluorescence imaging of antimicrobials and signaling molecules. M. You, A. Karunanayake, Q. Yu, R. Wu 8:55 ANYL 424. Engineering aptamers to maximize their analytical performance using a thermodynamic approach towards real-time monitoring of drugs in the living body. P. Dauphin Ducharme, K. Plaxco 9:20 ANYL 425. Smart aptamers forming G-quadruplex: Structural and functional change of aptamers forming G-quadruplex in response to surrounding conditions and its regulation with the ligands. K. Tsukakoshi, M. Nishio, I. Sasaki, Y. Ma, K. Nagasawa, Y. Kato, C. Nakamura, K. Sode, K. Ikebukuro 9:45 ANYL 426. Aptamer field-effect transistors for smallmolecule detection. K.M. Cheung, N. Nakatsuka, K. Yang, C. Zhao, P.S. Weiss, M. Stojanovic, A.M. Andrews 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 ANYL 427. Direct observation of ATP release from astroctytes using electrochemical, aptamer-based sensors interfaced with 3-D tissue scaffolds. M. Santos Cancel, R. White 10:45 ANYL 428. Electrochemical DNA sensors based on redox-labeled stem-loop probes in polymeric nanoporous films. Z. Harandizadeh, T. Ito 11:05 ANYL 429. Detection of osmium tetroxide, 2,2’-bipyridine-labelled thrombin and binding with aptamers. S.K. Galagedera, G. Flechsig 11:25 ANYL 430. Modification of cytosine-targeted DNA using novel N-mustard analogs of S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine as DNA methylation probes. N. Sirasunthorn, L. Comstock, A. Gerber 11:45 ANYL 431. Microgel tethering for integrated solidphase nucleic acid amplification and self-reported detection. F. Teng, Y. Ma, M. Libera 12:05 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Student Organized Symposia: New Paradigms in Nanoscale Electrocatalysis Cosponsored by YCC G. Jagdale, S. Jeong, N. Siepser, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 432. Catalysts for efficient electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO or ethylene/ethanol. P.J. Kenis

9:00 ANYL 433. Mapping the catalytic plasticity of bismuth/ Ionic liquid pairings for the electrochemical reduction of CO2. A. Atifi, J. Rosenthal 9:25 ANYL 434. Examining electrocatalytic activity at pseudo-single-crystals with scanning electrochemical microscopy. D. Wipf, T.J. Dowell, Y. Wang 9:50 ANYL 435. Electrocatalysis at nanostructured ensembles of ultramicroelectrode dimensions. C.G. Zoski 10:15 Intermission. 10:25 ANYL 436. Charged nanodroplets impacting nanotemplated surfaces: Nanoelectrospray construction of materials at near-molecular scales using edge-rich noncovalent templates. S.A. Claridge 10:50 ANYL 437. Photoelectrochemical detection of semiconductor nanoparticles: Electrochemical characterization of single nanoparticles and their colloidal behavior. M.A. Alpuche-Aviles, P. Chhetri, K. Barakoti, S. Gutierrez-Portocarrero, R. Kazemi Khouzani, G. Rana, P. Subedi 11:15 ANYL 438. Controlled electrodeposition of tetrathiafulvalene bromide (TTFBr) nanowires for gas sensing. L. Luo, H. Gunasekera, G. Mao, M. Kilani, X. Yu 11:40 ANYL 439. Naked-eye electrochemical sensor. K. Chow, J. Oh, S. Wijesinghe 12:05 Concluding Remarks.

Chemistry in Space & Past, Present & Future Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by ANYL

From Lab to Tap: Implications of Scaling Up NanoEnabled Environmental Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL

Analytical Topics for Ag Process Chemistry & Formulations Research Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104A

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS Z. Rosenzweig, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 440. Steady state and time resolved photoluminecsence studies reveal adverse interactions of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots with model membranes and living organisms. D.N. Williams, R.P. Brown, Z. Rosenzweig 2:05 ANYL 441. Making gold nanoparticles look like lipid vesicles and biological impacts thereof. C.J. Murphy 2:40 ANYL 442. Quantitative analysis of nanoparticle surfaces. H. Fairbrother, M.J. Gallagher 3:15 Intermission. 3:35 ANYL 443. -Omic analysis of the impact of lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) nanomaterial on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. E.E. Carlson 4:10 ANYL 444. Interaction of complex oxides with supported bilayers and organisms: Implications for environmental impact of lithium ion batteries. R.J. Hamers 4:45 ANYL 445. Towards active control of nanoparticlehydrogel composites. C.F. Landes 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Student Organized Symposia: Probing Biological Systems with Nonlinear Optics Advances in NLO Imaging Cosponsored by YCC R. Tran, Organizer H. Florian, S. Sarkar, C. Smith, Organizers, Presiding R. Tran, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 446. Analysis of collagen architecture alterations in human ovarian cancer via SHG polarization resolved microscopy. P. Campagnola, K. Campbell, R. Chaudhary, J. Handel 2:00 ANYL 447. Lipid flip-flop measured by sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. J.C. Conboy 2:30 ANYL 448. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy: Chemical imaging for biomedicine. W. Min

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9:25 ANYL 396. Fluorescent carbon dot surrogates – Probing health effects of black carbon while relating form and function in creating fluorescent carbon dots. C. Sumner, R.L. McCarley 9:45 Intermission. 10:05 ANYL 397. Label-free dynamic imaging of free standing lipid membranes and their hydration. O. Tarun, S. Roke 10:40 ANYL 398. Investigation of molecular interactions between cationic nanoparticles and Gram-positive bacterial cell walls. V. Feng, R. Tapia Hernandez, E.R. Caudill, K.P. Johnson, C.L. Haynes, J.A. Pedersen 11:15 ANYL 399. Experimental platforms to study molecular interactions of synthetic nanomaterials with biological membranes. J.A. Pedersen

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL 2:55 ANYL 449. Ultrastructural imaging with second harmonic generation Stokes-Mueller polarimetric microscopy. V. Barzda, A. Golaraei, L. Kontenis, K. Mirsanaye, M. Samim, M. Akens, B.C. Wilson 3:20 ANYL 450. Polarization dependent imaging for discrimination between protein aggregates and crystals. H. Florian, C. Smith, A. Sherman, A. Geiger, G.J. Simpson 3:40 Intermission. 3:50 ANYL 451. Sub-micron resolution chemical imaging by wide-field mid-infrared photothermal microscopy. Y. Bai, D. Zhang, A. Shakouri, J. Cheng 4:20 ANYL 452. Chiral vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy for probing water superstructures surrounding proteins. E.C. Yan, E. Perets 4:45 ANYL 453. Lipid membranes probed label-free with nonlinear light scattering and imaging: Direct probes of surface chemistry. S. Roke 5:10 ANYL 454. Kinetic advantage of a competitive assay for label-free detection in small-molecule immunoassays. R. Tran, K. Sly, J.C. Conboy

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104C

Next Generation Instrumentations & Measurement in Space Exploration Cosponsored by YCC S. M. Angel, K. S. Booksh, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 455. Remote Raman spectroscopy and LIBS using spatial heterodyne spectrometer with Fresnel collection optics. S.M. Angel 1:55 ANYL 456. Time-resolved remote Raman spectroscopic system for planetary exploration. S. Sharma 2:20 ANYL 457. The potential for flow chemistry in space. A.B. Beeler 2:45 ANYL 458. The International Space Station US National Lab – Exploring science in the final frontier. K. Savin 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 ANYL 459. High impact chemistry: Testing an organic detection instrument for an extraterrestrial kinetic penetrator. A.M. Stockton 3:55 ANYL 460. Multivariate analysis and Raman microspectroscopic imaging: Enhancing the search for life on Mars. J.P. Smith 4:20 ANYL 461. Raman hyper-spectral imaging and multivariate curve resolution applied to speciation in meteorites and meteorite impacts. K.S. Booksh

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Joint Symposium of the Separation Science Subdivisions G. A. Fugate, K. Phinney, C. Rimmer, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 462. Enhanced organics characterization using total organic carbon (TOC) coupled with size exclusion chromatography (SEC). A. Scott 1:55 ANYL 463. The application of rotary bed reactor (RBR) technology in the treatment of nuclear wastes. P. Sylvester 2:15 ANYL 464. Ion-selective polymers: Analysis of critical variables. S. Alexandratos, X. Zhu 2:35 ANYL 465. Performance evaluation of a new portable GC with photoionization detector for on-site real-time monitoring of environmental VOC. P.K. Nam, M. Bose, X. He, H. Shi 2:55 ANYL 466. Ultrafast gas chromatographic separation of fatty acid methyl esters in a biodiesel. B.P. Regmi, R. Chan, A. Atta, M. Agah 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 ANYL 467. GC/FUV for analysis of ambient (ppb level) greenhouse gases. J.L. Maclachlan, J.N. Driscoll 3:50 ANYL 468. Improved resolution analysis of cyclic siloxanes in silicone polymers with OH-terminated siloxanes. M.L. Rivard 4:10 ANYL 469. High-throughput density-based measurement and separation using magnetic levitation. S. Ge, Y. Wang, N. Deshler, D. Preston, G.M. Whitesides 4:30 ANYL 470. Asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation for analysis of biological macromolecules. W. Zhong, J. Lee, G. Adkins 4:50 ANYL 471. Automated liquid extraction surface analysis coupled with capillary electrophoresis for rapid and sensitive detection of pesticides on a fruit surface. S. Jeong, D. Chung

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SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 106

Student Organized Symposia: New Mass Spectrometry Methods for Polymer Analysis Cosponsored by YCC Financially supported by Waters Corporation J. Mao, B. Wei, Organizers K. J. Endres, J. O’Neill, S. R. Snyder, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 ANYL 472. Top-down mass spectrometry of crosslinked functional materials. K.J. Endres, R. Dilla, M. Becker, C. Wesdemiotis 2:20 ANYL 473. Materials analysis using secondary ion mass spectrometry: Challenges and opportunities. A.V. Walker 3:00 ANYL 474. Elucidating polymer architecture using mass spectrometry. S.M. Grayson 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 ANYL 475. Redefining ionization in mass spectrometry: Discovery and implementation of novel ionization processes. S. Trimpin 4:40 ANYL 476. MS-assisted design of sequence-controlled polymers to improve their sequenceability. L. Charles, J. Lutz 5:20 Discussion.

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 107A

Advances in Electrochemistry L. A. Baker, Organizer A. E. Ross, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 477. Silicon nanowires as an acetaminophen electrochemical sensor. R.R. Pandey, H.S. Alshahrani, E.H. Williams, S. Krylyuk, A.V. Davydov, C.C. Chusuei 2:00 ANYL 478. Simultaneous topography and qualitative surface charge mapping with scanning ion conductance microscopy. C. Zhu, L.A. Baker 2:25 ANYL 479. Electrochemistry at the three-phase interface. H. Ren, M. Edwards, H.S. White 2:50 ANYL 480. Electrosynthesis and characterization of an electrochromic pigment. T. Williams, C. Martin, A. Kumar, L. Deravi 3:15 ANYL 481. Electroanalytical performance of nitrogenincorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon thin-films in room temperature ionic liquids. R. Jarosova, G. Swain 3:40 ANYL 482. Detection of melatonin dynamics in the immune system using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. A. Hensley, A. Colley, A.E. Ross

From Lab to Tap: Implications of Scaling Up NanoEnabled Environmental Technologies Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Spectroscopy Analysis Sponsored by ENFL, Cosponsored by ANYL and COLL

New Analytical Technologies for Pesticide Analysis Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

Wastewater-Based Epidemiology: Opportunities & Challenges Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL

Atmospheric Fate & Transport of Volatilized Agricultural Emissions Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

Chiral Agrochemicals: Analytical Advances & Regulatory Trends Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Non-Extractable Residue (NER) Bio-Accessibility & Potential Risks Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

Pesticide Spray Drift: Application, Evaluation & Mitigation Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by ANYL and ENVR

Role of P450s in Broad-Spectrum Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Weeds: Symposium Honoring Stephen Powles Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Uses of Mass Spectrometry in Agricultural Research & Development : New Trends & Best Practices Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL and ENVR

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Opportunities in Forensic Proteomics: Applications, Bioinformatics, Admissibility, Quality Standards E. Merkley, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 ANYL 483. The need for advances in analytical chemistry to support forensic analysis of biological materials. R.l. Bull 8:25 ANYL 484. Statistical foundations for forensic proteomics. K. Jarman, E. Merkley 8:50 ANYL 485. ISO 17025 validation of method-based mass spectrometry techniques for the identification of Ricin in bioforensic samples. A. Garrett, K. Vereecke, N. Brown, A. Hanlon, A. Cardamone, R. Lehman, E. Merkley, K. Jarman, D. Wunschel, S. Cendrowski, K.L. Wahl, J. Burans 9:15 ANYL 486. Proteomics in the analysis of forensic bone. M. Buckley, N. Procopio, A. Williams, A. Chamberlain 9:40 ANYL 487. Forensic body fluid identification by proteomic mass spectrometry. H. Yang, S. Monier, E. Butler, D. Fenyo, D. Siegel 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 ANYL 488. Informatics approaches to forensic body fluid identification by proteomic mass spectrometry. E. Butler, W. Liu, S. Ma, D. Siegel, D. Fenyo 10:40 ANYL 489. Mass spectrometric forensic analysis of botulinum neurotoxins. S. Kalb, J. Baudys, J.R. Barr 11:05 ANYL 490. NextGen serology: Protein mass spectrometry for the forensic identification human body fluids. P.B. Danielson, H.E. McKiernan, C. Brown, K.M. Legg 11:30 ANYL 491. Human identification using genetically variant peptides in hair. B.R. Hart, D. Anex, K.E. Mason, F. Chu, S. Malfatti, N.J. Mulakken 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

New Synthetic Tools & Analytical Methods for the Near-IR Cosponsored by ORGN M. Henary, G. Patonay, Organizers, Presiding 9:00 ANYL 492. Pre-assembly of near-infrared fluorescent multivalent molecular probes for biological imaging. B.D. Smith 9:30 ANYL 493. Targeted theranostics featuring near infrared dyes. K. Burgess 9:50 ANYL 494. Fluoromodules consisting of a promiscuous RNA aptamer and red or blue fluorogenic cyanine dyes: Selection, characterization and bioimaging. B.A. Armitage, X. Tan 10:10 ANYL 495. Solvatofluorochromism in highly fluorescent asymmetric thiazolothiazole dyes. M.G. Walter, N. Sayresmith, S. Kristin 10:30 ANYL 496. Near-infrared fluorescent probes with single-photon frequency upconversion fluorescence for detection in live cells. J. Bi, H. Liu 10:50 ANYL 497. Near-infrared fluorescent dyes and probes based on the rhodol scaffold. M. Xian 11:10 ANYL 498. Ratiometric near-infrared fluorescent probes for sensitive detection of pH changes in live cells. S. Xia, J. Wang, H. Liu 11:30 ANYL 499. Design and synthesis of water-soluble NIR contrast agents for In vivo optical imaging. M. Henary, E. Owens, H. Hyun, H. Choi

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Advances in Spectroscopy J. M. Harris, Organizer D. A. Sheen, Presiding 8:25 ANYL 500. Diffusion behavior of charged dye molecules in self-assembled organic nanotubes studied using imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. G. Ghimire, R. Espinoza, H. Xu, S. Nagasaka, N. Kameta, M. Masuda, D.A. Higgins, T. Ito

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Student Organized Symposia: Enabling Spectroscopies for Nanomaterial Applications: Energy Conversion to Therapeutics Cosponsored by YCC S. Crawford, X. Gan, L. Marbella, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 ANYL 508. Plasmonic nanoparticles: From fundamental optical properties to applications. S. Link 9:10 ANYL 509. Luminescent gold nanoparticles. J. Zheng 9:45 ANYL 510. Spectroscopic measurements of carrier densities and redox potentials in tunable inorganic frameworks. A.M. Schimpf 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 ANYL 511. Spatially resolved spectroscopies for semiconductor nanomaterials. W.A. Tisdale 11:10 ANYL 512. Monitoring the aggregation of silver nanoparticles using particle-impact voltammetry coupled with UV-vis spectroscopy. L. Ezra, J. Hui, K.R. Riley 11:35 ANYL 513. In situ electrochemical spectroscopies for studying electrocatalysis and batteries: From IR to NMR to scanning probe microscopy. Y. Tong 12:10 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Advances in Mass Spectrometry M. F. Bush, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 ANYL 514. Development of ultra high-resolution multilevel structures for lossless ion manipulations ion mobility platform. Y.M. Ibrahim, A. Prabhakaran, A. Li, R.V. Norheim, C.E. Schimelfenig, S.V. Garimella, R.D. Smith 8:55 ANYL 515. Advanced robotics coupled with a nonchromatographic mass spectrometry platform to address complex matrixes for in vitro and in vivo biopharmaceutical studies. J. Zhang, C. Cruz, P. Faustino 9:20 ANYL 516. Photochemical vapor generation for the quantitative analysis of transition elements by ICP-MS: A feasibility investigation. R.M. de Oliveira, G. Salvador, B.S. Soares, D.L. Borges 9:45 ANYL 517. Prototype coded aperture miniature mass spectrometer using a cycloidal sector mass analyzer. J.J. Amsden, P.J. Herr, D.M. Landry, W. Kim, P. Vyas, K. Horvath, M.P. Kirley, C. Parker, A.D. Keil, K.H. Gilcrist, S.D. Hall, J.B. Carlson, N. Baldasaro, D. Stokes, S.J. Edwards, R.P. Sperline, M.B. Denton, B.R. Stoner, M.E. Gehm, J.T. Glass 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 ANYL 518. Interpreting the collision cross sections of proteins: Insights from Ion mobility, unfolding, and folding of ions in the gas phase. M.F. Bush 10:45 ANYL 519. Gas-phase photo-crosslinking and tandem mass spectrometry in unraveling the noncovalent bonding within physiologically active molecule complexes. Y. Liu, S.R. Huang, F. Turecek 11:10 ANYL 520. Active dimethyl labeling and mass spectrometry for protein structure analysis. Y. Wu 11:35 ANYL 521. Characterization and quantification of isobaric antisense oligonucleotide impurities by tandem mass spectrometry with ion mobility. B. Guan, X. Wang, J. Stolee

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 251

Advances in Electrochemistry L. A. Baker, Organizer A. E. Ross, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 ANYL 522. Use of citric acid to form an artificial SEI on silicon nanoparticles to enhance the performance of lithium-ion battery anodes. K.K. Chandrasiri, S. Jurng, B. Subramanian Parimalam, C. Cuong Nguyen, B. Young, B.L. Lucht, D. Heskett 9:30 ANYL 523. Electrochemical investigations of silver nanoparticle dissolution and aggregation. K.R. Riley, L. Ezra, Z.J. O’Dell, K. Wheeler 9:55 ANYL 524. Chemical sensing using a nanoneedlebased nanopore probe. K. Shoji, R. Kawano, R.J. White 10:20 ANYL 525. Electromembrane extraction as an improved sample preparation platform for endogenous hormones in plant tissues. J. Suh, S. Han, Y. Wang 10:45 ANYL 526. Use of methanol extracts of Kalanchoe cretana and Landolphia dulcis for corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 5.0M H2SO4 . T.A. Abii 11:10 ANYL 527. Electrochemical biosensor for the detection of sub-nanomolar levels of environmental pollutants. A.L. Furst, M.B. Francis 11:35 ANYL 528. Investigation of structural properties of imidazolium-based ionic liquids on redox electrochemistry. H. Hu, K. George, V. Prabhakaran, V. Thalangamaarachchige, S. Jagdeep-Kaur, E.L. Quitevis, J. Laskin

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Sponsored by ENFL, Cosponsored by ANYL and COLL

RNAi & Gene Editing: Utilization for Enhanced Crop Production Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD and ANYL

Wastewater-Based Epidemiology: Opportunities & Challenges Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL

THURSDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Methodologies for Use in Cleaning Validations H. J. Kaiser, Organizer, Presiding P. Lopolito, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 ANYL 529. Choosing appropriate analytical methodologies for use in cleaning validations. H.J. Kaiser, B. Ritts 2:25 ANYL 530. Rethinking cleaning validation for active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturing. D. Hadziselimovic 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 ANYL 531. Effective cleaning validation of reusable medical devices. A. Thanavaro 3:40 ANYL 532. Evaluating surface cleanliness using riskbased approach. P. Lopolito 4:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

New Synthetic Tools & Analytical Methods for the Near-IR Cosponsored by ORGN M. Henary, G. Patonay, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 533. Near-IR fluorescent detection of blood analytes using erythrocyte-encapsulated sensors. H. Sepasizangabadi, G. Gilyot, N.P. Cooley, T.E. Glass 2:00 ANYL 534. Nuclear-NIR multifunctional contrast agents for pancreatic cancer imaging. H. Choi, K. Bao 2:20 ANYL 535. Far-red and near-infrared seminaphthofluorophores for targeted imaging of pancreatic cancer. R.M. Strongin 2:40 ANYL 536. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for detection of pH in live cells. M. Fang 3:00 ANYL 537. Near infrared fluorescent imaging of brain tumor with IR780 dye incorporated phospholipid nanoparticles. Q. Xie

3:20 ANYL 538. Fiber optical near infrared spectrometry (FONIRS) for non-invasive monitoring of skin accumulation of systemically injected drug carriers. J. Griffin, M. Benchimol, D. Simberg 3:40 ANYL 539. Genetically encoded near-infrared fluorescent probes for in vivo imaging. K.D. Piatkevich 4:00 ANYL 540. Fluorescent copolymerized silica nanoparticles: Synthesis and applications. G. Patonay, G. Chapman, M. Henary, W. Abdelwahab

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Advances in Spectroscopy J. M. Harris, Organizer D. A. Sheen, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 541. Super-resolution force spectroscopy. S. Xu 1:55 ANYL 542. High sensitivity infared nanospectroscopy enabled by nanophotonic AFM transducers. G. Ramer, J. Chae, S. An, V. Aksyuk, A. Centrone 2:20 ANYL 543. Infrared nanopolarimetric analysis of structure and anisotropy of thin films. K. Hinrichs, T. Shaykhutdinov 2:45 ANYL 544. ATR-FTIR study of bacteria and proteins on the bare and coated ZnSe internal reflection element. H. Li, R. Chen, C. Guo 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 ANYL 545. Data harmonization in metabolomics for quality assurance and control. D.A. Sheen, B.A. Benner, Y. Simon, W. Rocha, C.M. Jones, N. Blonder, K.A. Lippa 3:45 ANYL 546. Using principal component analysis to select an appropriate matrix for solid standards in laserinduced breakdown spectroscopy. D. Rusak, C. Hudson, F. Alfifi 4:10 ANYL 547. Significance of preanalytical factors in measuring Cr and Co levels in human whole blood. Y.L. Sommer, C. Ward, J.C. Georgi, P. Cheng, K.L. Caldwell, R.L. Jones 4:35 ANYL 548. IRMPD spectroscopy of carbohydrates: Fundamental questions and application to glycomics. I. Compagnon

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Student Organized Symposia: Enabling Spectroscopies for Nanomaterial Applications: Energy Conversion to Therapeutics Cosponsored by YCC S. Crawford, X. Gan, L. Marbella, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 ANYL 549. Ultrafast Raman spectroscopic probes of solar cells and plasmonic photocatalysts. R.R. Frontiera 2:10 ANYL 550. Ultrasensitive “OFF-ON” fluorescence signal strategy for sensing and imaging microRNAs in vitro and in vivo based on oriented gold nanoconjugates. J. Sun, X. Sun 2:35 ANYL 551. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy applied to nanomaterials: From quantum dots to thin films. C. Burda 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 ANYL 552. X-ray emission spectroscopy as an enabling tool for the characterization of emissive quantum dots. B.M. Cossairt, J. Stein, W. Holden, G. Seidler 4:00 ANYL 553. Active monitoring of cellular uptake, controlled nucleic acid release, and coordinated cellular responses using a gold nanoparticle bio-optical transponder (nano-BOT). G.F. Strouse 4:35 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Advances in Mass Spectrometry M. F. Bush, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 ANYL 554. Using mass spectrometry to exploit a single isoleucine/leucine difference in ERK substrate binding sites for activity-based profiling of MAPK signaling. M. Shin, C.E. Franks, K. Hsu 1:55 ANYL 555. AuNPs for enhanced ionization and fragmentation of biomolecules using LDI-MS. K.A. Stumpo 2:20 ANYL 556. Effective matrix-free sample plate of highly ordered gold nanoparticle thin film in surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for quantitative analysis of bone biomarkers in osteoporosis. X. Pan, T. Chang, K. Chen, S. Tan, J. Kuo, T. Kuo

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8:50 ANYL 501. Photoactivatable BODIPY probe for localization-based super-resolution imaging. C.S. Wijesooriya, J. Peterson, P. Shrestha, A. Winter, E.A. Smith 9:15 ANYL 502. Developments of novel fluorescent molecular probes for the selective detection of neurotransmitters. Y. Suzuki 9:40 ANYL 503. Tuing fluorescence on nano-interface through click chemistry for diagnosing Wilson’s disease. W. Chen 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 ANYL 504. Non-negative matrix factorization filter for digital deconvolution. S. Griffin, J.A. Biechele-Speziale, C. Smith, X. You-Dow, G.J. Simpson 10:40 ANYL 505. Detecting DNA methylation using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). S. Hasan, Y. He, J. Wang, M.R. Gartia 11:05 ANYL 506. Biosensing based on porous gold nanostructure substrates with plasmonic tunability. W. Qian 11:30 ANYL 507. Silk fibroin one dimensional photonic crystals sensor fabrication and application in small molecules detections. M. Guo, J. Yin, S. Li

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

ANYL/BIOT/BIOL 2:45 ANYL 557. Swab touch spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of trace residues of forensic relevance. P.W. Fedick, R.M. Bain, W.L. Fatigante, C.C. Mulligan, R.G. Cooks 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 ANYL 558. Identifying volatile organic compounds in mouse urine that distinguish between localized and metastatic breast cancer using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry QTOF. M.D. Woollam, M. Teli, P. Angarita, S. Liu, A. Siegel, H. Yokota, M. Agarwal 3:45 ANYL 559. Towards enhanced metabolomic data analysis of mass spectrometry image: Multivariate curve resolution and machine learning. X. Tian, G. Zhang, Y. Shao, Z. Yang 4:10 ANYL 560. Identification of ortho-substituted benzoic acid/ester derivatives via the gas-phase neighboring group participation effect in (+)-ESI high resolution mass spectrometry. H. Sheng, W. Blincoe, A. Rodriguez Granillo, J. Sauri, N.A. Pierson, L.A. Joyce, I.K. Mangion 4:35 ANYL 561. Application of mass spectrometry to analysis of applications of Fokker-Plank equation to the velocity of chemical reactions. M. Fundator

BIOT

DIVISION OF BIOCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY MONDAY AFTERNOON Undergraduate Research Posters Biotechnology Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOT and SOCED

BIOL

Division of Biological Chemistry S. Kelley and P. Bevilacqua, Program Chairs OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: CRISPR (see AGFD, Thur) Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes (see ANYL, Wed) Nanoelectroanalytical Chemistry for Biological & Material Sciences (see ANYL, Sun) Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier (see ANYL, Sun, Mon) Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health (see CARB, Tue, Wed) Biologically Related Molecules & Processes (see ORGN, Mon, Tue)

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Repligen Award for the Chemistry of Biological Processes P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers S. G. Withers, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 BIOL 1. Selective thyroid hormone agonists for central nervous system diseases. T.S. Scanlan 9:45 BIOL 2. Discovery, design and development of human amylase inhibitors: From nM to pM. S.G. Withers 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 BIOL 3. Genome editing as a therapy for duch*enne muscular dystrophy. C. Gersbach, C. Nelson, J. RobinsonHamm, J. Kwon

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11:20 BIOL 4. The chemistry of newborn screening, diagnosis, and prognosis of genetic diseases. M.H. Gelb

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Early Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry P. C. Bevilacqua, Organizer S. O. Kelley, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 BIOL 5. Chemical proteomics approaches to interrogate the RNA epitranscriptome. R. Kleiner 8:55 BIOL 6. Bystander-assisted immunotherapy: A molecular approach to drugging drug resistance. R.J. Mancini, A.E. Nielsen, J. Hantho, A.J. Burt 9:15 BIOL 7. IMPACT: A chemical Strategy for imaging phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid signaling. J.M. Baskin 9:35 BIOL 8. Structural basis of fatty acyl recognition and transfer by DHHC palmitoyltransferases. A. Banerjee, M. Rana, P. Kumar, C. Lee, R. Verardi 9:55 BIOL 9. Chemical optogenetic modulation of inflammation and immunity. P. Chang 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 BIOL 10. Small molecule stimulators of the 20S core particle of the proteasome to degrade excess proteins. D.J. Trader, R. Coleman 10:50 BIOL 11. Exciton engineering for deep-brain imaging of modulatory neurotransmitters. A. Beyene, J. Del Bonis O’Donnell, M. Landry 11:10 BIOL 12. Detect protein aggregation in live cells with turn-on fluorescence. X. Zhang 11:30 BIOL 13. Elucidating mechanisms of substrate transport in membrane transporters. D. Shukla 11:50 BIOL 14. Ligand binding pathways and conformational transitions of the HIV protease. Y. Miao, Y.M. Huang, R. Walker, J. McCammon, C. Chang

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier

4:35 BIOL 19. Using clickable substrate mimics to illuminate phospholipase D activity within cells. T.W. Bumpus, J.M. Baskin 4:50 Introduction of Awardee. 4:55 BIOL 20. Exploring enzymatic transition states. V.L. Schramm

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Debunking Myths of the Undruggable & Indistinguishable P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. E. Hargrove, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 21. Direct cytosolic delivery of nucleic acids and proteins (including CRISPR/Cas9) through membrane fusion: Who needs endosomes? V.M. Rotello 2:10 BIOL 22. Supramolecular sensing of post-translational modifications. M. Waters 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 BIOL 23. Expanding the chemical space for RNA recognition. B.L. Miller 3:45 BIOL 24. Aminoglycoside receptors reveal patterns in RNA recognition and conformational change. A.E. Hargrove

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

SUNDAY EVENING

Use of Computer Simulation to Teach Chemical Kinetics & Enzyme Kinetics in Undergraduate Research & Education

SECTION A

Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOL and COMP

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Chemical Approaches to Interrogate Cell Biology P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers E. Miller, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 15. Beyond proteomics: Simultaneous profiling and decoding precision protein-cysteine signaling axes in living cells, fish, and worms. Y. Aye 2:05 BIOL 16. Chemical tools for interrogating metalloenzymes in cells and in vivo. E.L. Que 2:40 Intermission. 2:55 BIOL 17. Electrophysiology: Unplugged. New chemistries to probe cellular physiology. E. Miller 3:30 BIOL 18. DNA nanodevices map enzymatic activity in vivo. Y. Krishnan

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Gordon Hammes Award Lecture P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. Schepartz, Presiding 4:30 Introductory Remarks.

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Current Topics P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers 6:30 – 8:30 BIOL 25. Potential peptide based on in silico analysis can bind proinflammatory cytokines as a therapeutic strategy for anti-inflammation. H. Huang, H. Hsu, S. Jiang BIOL 26. Identification and reduction of undesirable PAINs and dead end ligands from an agricultural fungicide screening program. S. Meyer BIOL 27. Modulating the binding affinity of Pal to peptidoglycan. X. Liu, S. Lewis, S. Stanton, C. LaClair, S. Phadke, L. Vacca Michel BIOL 28. Rapid protein identification with an open port sampling interface coupled to a compact mass spectrometer. C. Hao, D. Eikel, S. Prosser, J.D. Henion BIOL 29. Using NMR to study the aggregation and diffusion of a phase separating eye lens protein. A. Fadden, J. Faraone, K. Umphred-Wilson, M. O’Neil, J.L. Mills, G. Thurston, L. Vacca Michel BIOL 30. Thioamides and proteolysis: Examining the effects and applications of a single-atom substitution. T. Barrett, X. Chen, C. Liu, J. Wang, E. Petersson BIOL 31. Glutaric acid production from 5-aminovaleric acid using aminovalerate aminotransferase and semialdehyde dehydrogenase in Escherichia coli as whole cell biocatalyst. E. Lee, Y. Hong, S. Hyun, E. Kim, J. Ju, Y. Yang, H. Jeong, K. Park BIOL 32. Peptide assisted supramolecular polymerization of the anionic porphyrin meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphine. E.M. Kohn, D.J. Shirley, H.C. Fry, G.A. Caputo BIOL 33. Novel chemistry for site-specific antibody bioconjugates. T.I. Chio, H. Gu, K. Mukherjee, L. Tumey, S.L. Bane BIOL 34. Load bearing properties of cartilage. F. Horkay, E.K. Dimitriadis, I. Horkayne-Szakaly, P.J. Basser

BIOL 61. Transport of amyloid-β across the blood-brain barrier by P-glycoprotein: A novel therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease. H. Holt, E. Moore, M. Riese, M. Faucett, F. Gonzalez, M. Moss BIOL 62. Novel virus inspired approach to discover first in class preclinical assets for a range of therapeutic areas. B. de Chassey, L. Meyniel-Schicklin, M. Denizot, L. Lines, P. Mallinjoud, J. Vonderscher, E. Meldrum BIOL 63. Quantifying tradeoffs in FRET-based biosensor design. S. Ghilardi, A.P. Weaver, A.E. Sgro BIOL 64. Identification of an archaeal maltooligosyltrehalose trehalohydrolase encoded by an interrupted gene. Y. Zhou, G. Xie, L. Chang, Y. Wang, R. Gao BIOL 65. Novel antimicrobials from the sea: The various antimicrobial mechanisms of the Clavanins. S.A. Juliano, J. Portelinha, A.M. Angeles Boza BIOL 66. Cadmium associates to DREAM and alters its interactions with intracellular partners. S. Azam, J. Miksovska BIOL 67. Molecularly imprinted magnetic bacterial cellulose nanofibers for recognition of nucleoside. Y. Saylan, K. Pospiskova, I. Safarik, A. Denizli BIOL 68. Effects of conformational dynamics on enzyme evolution in TIM-barrel-fold proteins. D. Petrovic, S.C. Kamerlin BIOL 69. Magnesium regulates the circadian oscillator in cyanobacteria. Y.M. Jeong, Y. Kim BIOL 70. Optimizing an allosteric protein for lanthanide binding by rationally designed modification of the metal binding site. M.P. Takacs, A. Gigon, O. Makhlynets, I.V. Korendovych BIOL 71. Cloning and expression of recombinant chondroitinase AC II and its comparison to the Arthrobacter auescens enzyme. A. Williams, W. He, M. Koffas, R.J. Linhardt, B. Cress BIOL 72. Use of peptides as cofactors for RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes. R. Sapia BIOL 73. Expanding the potential prenylome through unanticipated prenylation of non-canonical C-terminal peptide sequences. S. Ashok, W.K. Schmidt, J. Hougland BIOL 74. Development and molecular understanding of plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) in combating cancer. M.R. Ali BIOL 75. Effects of man-made nanoparticles on aerobic denitrification by strain Pseudomonas stutzeri PCN-1. Q. Chen BIOL 76. Enzyme-induced gain of function strategy for selective cancer therapy. Q. Li, Y. Li BIOL 77. Synthesis and characterization of a highly biocompatible and fluorescent carbon material: Graphene oxide quantum dots. J.E. Ortiz-Santiago, R. Carrasquillo-De Jesus, V. Rivera-Rodriguez, L. Cunci BIOL 78. Angiopoietin-1 accelerates restoration of endothelial cells barrier integrity from nanoparticle-induced leakiness. J. Tee, M. Setyawati, F. Peng, D. Leong, H. Ho BIOL 79. Ligase catalyzed oligonucleotide polymerization with adjustable linker length. C. Guo, Y. Mahdavi-Amiri, R. Hili BIOL 80. Structural characterization of protein–small molecule interactions in ternary complexes using photoaffinity labelling and mass spectrometry: Studies with the macrocyclic natural product rapamycin. H.A. Flaxman, C. Chang, C. Woo BIOL 81. Probing interactions of β-galactosidases with galactonoamidines. J.B. Pickens, S. Striegler BIOL 82. Nanoparticle uptake using correlative lightelectron microscopic (CLEM) techniques. B. Caffrey BIOL 83. Fenamate protects against 1-methyl-4phenylpyridinium- induced apoptosis in dopaminergic MN9D cells. V. Le, M. Mapa, K. Wimalasena BIOL 84. Antimicrobial investigation of three essential components of Piper betle leaves against oral bacteria. M. Lopez, M. Hadisurya, R. Cornwall BIOL 85. Designed enzyme promotes selective posttranslational acylation. P. Gosavi, M. Jayachandran, J.J. Rempillo, O. Makhlynets, I.V. Korendovych BIOL 86. Computational studies of the NUDIX hydrolase superfamily. S. Richman, K. O’Donovan, P.A. Craig, J.L. Mills, S.F. O’Handley BIOL 87. NagD from Yersinia pestis. M. Le, L. Dass, I. Moreno, S.F. O’Handley BIOL 88. Photodynamic inactivation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using hybrid photosensitizers based on amphiphilic block copolymer functionalized gold nanoparticles. N. Wijesiri, T. Ozkaya Ahmadov, P. Wang, J. Zhang, H. Tang, X. Yu, N. Ayres, P. Zhang

BIOL 89. Structure and function of Terfestatin biosynthesis proteins TerB and TerC. J. Clinger, S. Elshahawi, Y. Zhang, R. Hall, Y. Liu, M.D. Miller, J.S. Thorson, G.N. Phillips BIOL 90. Probing the protein-protein interactions in nonribosomal peptide synthetases: Understanding the mechanism of epimerization domain activity. W.E. Kim, A. Patel, M.D. Burkart BIOL 91. Biological evaluation of a blood-brain barrier permeable oxime: in vitro and in vivo evaluation of LLNL02. M.A. Malfatti, H.A. Enright, N.A. Be, S. Hok, V. Lao, E.A. Kuhn, B.J. Bennion, T.S. Carpenter, F.C. Lightstone, T.H. Nguyen, C.A. Valdez BIOL 92. Development of a blood-brain barrier permeable oxime: in silico and chemical synthesis of a neutral acetylcholinesterase reactivator. C.A. Valdez, B.J. Bennion, T.S. Carpenter, H.A. Enright, M.A. Malfatti, N.A. Be, V. Lao, S. Hok, E.A. Kuhn, F.C. Lightstone, T.H. Nguyen BIOL 93. Probing a network of interacting amino acid side chains at orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase. A. Reyes, D. Plache, A.P. Koudelka, T.L. Amyes, J.P. Richard BIOL 94. Determining the role of Pal in Escherichia coli sepsis. L. Gallardo, M. Zavorin, C. McNamara, J. Pierce, M. Bauer, J. Hellman, M. Pichichero, L. Vacca Michel BIOL 95. Peptide vaccine targeting Pyroglutamate-3 Amyloid β induces strong immune response and reduces cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease model mice. H. Chen, G. Li, P. Chen, Z. Hu, Y. Chen, Y. Zhao, Y. Li BIOL 96. Thermoswitchability of β-Glucuronidase variants revealed through single-molecule studies. Y. Jiang, A. Pothukuchy, A. Simon, B. Morrow, A.D. Ellington, D.R. Walt BIOL 97. Red light-triggered sensing of RNAs in living cells. T. Bachmann, O. Zozulia, A. Mokhir BIOL 98. Thermodynamics of chiral α,α-dialkylated amino acid incorporation in a β-hairpin peptide. S. Schettler, W.S. Horne, G. Lengyel BIOL 99. Metabolomic lipid profiling of dinoflagellates under saturation and starvation conditions: Identification of biomarkers of coastal ecosystem health. K. Roohani, B.A. Haubrich, K. Yue, N. D’souza, S. Menden-Deuer, T. Rynearson, C. Reid BIOL 100. Combination cancer treatment through photothermally controlled release of selenous acid from gold nanocages. H. Cheng, D. Huo, Y. Xia BIOL 101. Photopharmaceutical therapy utilizing vitamin B12 as a molecular scaffold. D.C. Zites, C.G. Sheveland, T.A. Shell BIOL 102. Structure of influenza hemagglutinin antibody from Rhesus Macaque with disulfide bond in its CDRH3. H.A. Chaires, G. Bajic, M.A. Moody, S.C. Harrison BIOL 103. Development of photo-cross-linking oligodeoxyribonucleotides with 2’-O-diazirine-conjugated nucleosides. S. Tatsumi, H. Hirose, A. Kobori BIOL 104. Selenium-atom-modified DNAs with high stability and antisense activity for gene silencing and drug discovery. Z. Fang, W. Zhang, Q. Lin, Z. Huang BIOL 105. Combining polymyxin B with ionic liquids in aqueous solution for disrupting lipid vesicles and enhancing antibiotic activities. K. Cook, G.A. Caputo, T.D. Vaden BIOL 106. Innovation of new luciferin analog for in vivo optical imaging. R. Saito, N. Kitada, M. Kiyama, S. Higashi, S.W. Lu, R. Obata, T. Hirano, S. Maki BIOL 107. Effects of alkylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids on myoglobin denaturation by zwitterionic, cationic, and anionic detergents. J.Y. Lee, E.M. Kohn, K.M. Selfridge, T.D. Vaden, G.A. Caputo BIOL 108. Characterization of the human α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc1. M.S. Hanes, C.E. Cutler, S. Dutta, N. Jia, R. Cummings BIOL 109. Redox at the cell surface and beyond: Probing the dynamic redox environment surrounding a cell. C. Foster, T. Yu, R. Dutt, L. Jiang, D. Galileo, C. Thorpe BIOL 110. Novel near infrared absorbing and fluorescent dyes for bioimaging. L. Takiff, R. Pawle, K.M. Bardon, R. Minns, S. Selfridge BIOL 111. Characterization of the colibactin-activating peptidase ClbP and design of a fluorogenic activity probe. M. Volpe, M. Wilson, C.A. Brotherton, E. Balskus

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

99

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOL 35. Site-specific installation of succinyl lysine analog into histones reveals the effect of H2BK34 succinylation on nucleosome dynamics. Y. Jing, Z. Liu, G. Tian, X. Bao, T. Ishibashi, X.D. Li BIOL 36. Structural interrogation of microbial dynemicin biosynthetic enzymes. S. Alvarado, S.G. Van Lanen, J.S. Thorson, G.N. Phillips BIOL 37. Effects of Asn47 and Asn54 to Ser mutation on Amicyanin. S. Jeoung, M. Choi, S. Shin BIOL 38. Pharmacoproteomic analysis highlights the dabigatran induced downregulation of integrin triggered signaling and inhibition of aggregation in thrombin activated human platelets. J. Gonzalez, A. Babinska, E.L. Ewul, M. Dzieciatkowska, E. Timpo, M. Salifu, C.C. Clement BIOL 39. Bioconjugation of functional molecule to transthyretin amyloids by transpeptidase Sortase A. M. Sakono, T. Ohshima, A. Miyakoshi BIOL 40. Advanced optichemical biological probes for photoinducible protein swapping. D. Wu, C. Aonbangkhen, D.M. Chenoweth BIOL 41. Effect of nanoparticle polyethylene glycol surface density on ecumicin: Toward redesigning the PEG surface of nanocarriers for drug delivry. S. Hwang BIOL 42. Rapid micro-molding process for fabricating polymeric 3D structures with biomaterials using hydrophobic elastomeric molds. S. Hwang BIOL 43. Covalent trapping of human ADAR catalytic domain using thiol modified dsRNA. S. Park, C. Palumbo, P.A. Beal BIOL 44. Quality control of phytopharmaceuticals in Costa Rica with the use of 1H-NMR and PCA. L. Padilla-Cortes, J. Quesada, R. Murillo BIOL 45. Selective peptide binders for PDL1 as an immunogenic target in cancer. G. Kamalinia, T.T. Takahashi, R.W. Roberts BIOL 46. Chemotherapeutics modulate cancer stemness in breast tumor spheroids. D.S. Reynolds, Z.F. Mattes, K.M. Tevis, W.A. Blessing, Y.L. Colson, M.H. Zaman, M.W. Grinstaff BIOL 47. Characterization and enzyme mechanism of human pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 2 (HsPYCR2) wildtype and disease variants. S.M. Patel, D.F. Becker BIOL 48. Rapid detection of cellular phenotypic changes using nanosensors: Applications in toxicology and cancer stem cell therapeutics. Y. Geng, N. Le, H. Goel, T. Yoshii, A. Mercurio, V.M. Rotello BIOL 49. Organic framework derived porous carbon nanomaterial for cancer imaging and phototherapy. S. Guan BIOL 50. Syntheses and evaluation of photoactivatable myristoyl analogues for identification of new binding partners of UNC119 proteins. N. Kaiser, T. Mejuch, P. Janning, H. Waldmann BIOL 51. Synthetic multivalent MUC1 glycopeptide architecture based on b-cyclodextrin. Y. Yu, P. Chen, Y. Li BIOL 52. Synthesis and characterization of biogenic selenium nanoparticles with antimicrobial properties made by Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D. Medina Cruz, T. Webster BIOL 53. Natural products from the Populus microbiome protect against Pseudomonas syringae induced leaf blight. P.M. Blair, M. Ridout, G. Newcombe, D. Pelletier, M. Doktycz BIOL 54. Smart Chitosan polymeric derivatives as human genome carriers. H.S. Al-Lami, A.A. Saleh, S.H. Mutasher BIOL 55. Classical and variant approaches to synthesis of N-Mannich bases of phenyl hydroxyl ketones, their characterization, urease inhibition and antioxidant activities. G.K. Oloyede, S.M. Ali, M. Lateef, G. Anyaele, A. Mayowa BIOL 56. Two engineered OBPs with opposite temperaturedependent affinities towards 1-aminoanthracene. F. Gonçalves, T.G. Castro, N.G. Azoia, A. Ribeiro, C. Silva, A. Cavaco-Paulo BIOL 57. Mass spectrometric characterization of a recombinant ‘two-target’ fusion protein. S. Bhoraskar, C. Ramineni, J. Xu BIOL 58. Complex dynamics of hormone perception and receptor activation in plant drought resistance signaling. C. Zhao, D. Shukla BIOL 59. Enzymatic synthesis of sequence-defined synthetic nucleic acid polymers: Application to in vitro selection of diversely functionalized DNA aptamers. Y. Lei, D. Kong, R. Hili BIOL 60. Binding interaction of the bee venom peptide melittin with the small heat shock protein alpha crystallin. L. Ramirez, A. Shekhtman, J. Pande

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOL Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers M. Shoulders, Presiding 9:00 BIOL 112. Engineering ligand-based receptor agonists or antagonists as next-generation protein therapeutics. J. Cochran 9:40 BIOL 113. New strategies to explore the interplay between proteostasis and evolution. M. Shoulders 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 BIOL 114. Identifying and targeting tumor neoantigens. C. Wu 11:15 BIOL 115. Synthetic polymer xenoproteins. B.L. Pentelute

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Debunking Myths of the Undruggable & Indistinguishable P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. E. Hargrove, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 BIOL 116. Covalent targeting of protein interfaces. M. Arkin 9:40 BIOL 117. Towards testing the miRNA proxy hypothesis: Cracking the glycocode with miRs. L.K. Mahal 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 BIOL 118. Using the power of protein based nanotechnology based immunotherapy to target cancer. C.R. Wagner 11:15 BIOL 119. Targeting NF-kappaB signaling with large and small molecules. A.K. Mapp

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Advances in Sensors & Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring

3:45 BIOL 128. Protein folding in single-cells of living zebrafish. C. Davis, R. Feng, M. Gruebele 4:00 BIOL 129. Assaying RNA localization In Situ with spatially restricted oxidation via red light. Y. Li, R.C. Spitale, M.B. Aggarwal, K. Ke, V. Guan 4:15 BIOL 130. Glycan-modified bacteriophage evokes Th1-type (cancer-relevant) immune responses. M. Alam, C.M. Jarvis, R. Hincapie, C. Sanhueza-Chavez, C. McKay, J. Schimer, K. Xu, J. Hank, J. Olsen, P. Sondel, M. Cook, M. Finn, L.L. Kiessling 4:30 BIOL 131. Human gut microbes metabolize the Parkinson’s disease drug Levodopa. V. Maini Rekdla, E. Balskus 4:45 BIOL 132. Chemical and structural insights into developing synthetic ligands for a PreQ1 riboswitch. C.M. Connelly, T. Numata, R.E. Boer, M.H. Moon, R.S. Sinniah, A.R. Ferré-D’Amaré, J.S. Schneekloth 5:00 BIOL 133. Bioinformatics and chemistry join forces for antibiotics discovery. J. Chu, X. Vila-Farres, C. Lemetre, M. Ternei, S.F. Brady 5:15 BIOL 134. Host chaperones facilitate influenza nucleoprotein immune escape. A. Ponomarenko, A. Phillips, K. Chen, J. Miao, S. McHugh, V. Butty, S. Levine, Y. Lin, M. Shoulders

100

Chemical Immunomodulation P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers C. M. Woo, Organizer, Presiding 8:45 BIOL 144. Chemical biology of anti-cancer innate immunity. L. Li 9:20 BIOL 145. Binding site hotspot mapping to elucidate new immunomodulatory targets of old drugs. C. Woo 9:55 BIOL 146. Small molecules and macrocycles antagonizing human PD1-PDL1. A. Doemling, T. Holak, S. Shaabani, T. Zarganis, K. Magiera-Mularz, K. Zak, G. Dubin 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 BIOL 147. Towards therapeutic targeting of the MUSASHI RNA binding protein network. M. Kharas 11:20 BIOL 148. Targeted protein degradation induced by thalidomide analogs. B. Ebert

P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. Choudhary, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 BIOL 135. CRISPR gene editing: How it works; where it’s going. J. Doudna 2:15 BIOL 136. Nucleic acid delivery systems for RNA therapy and gene editing. D.G. Anderson 2:55 BIOL 137. Small-molecule activators, inhibitors, and degraders of CRISPR-Cas9 in cells and organisms. A. Choudhary 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 BIOL 138. Synthetic gene networks: A bottom-up approach to genome engineering. J. Collins 4:30 BIOL 139. Base editing: Chemistry on a target nucleotide in the genome of living cells. D.R. Liu 5:10 Concluding remarks.

Projects of NCI Chemical Biology Consortium: A Unique, Collaborative Approach to Cancer Drug Discovery Sponsored by MEDI, Cosponsored by BIOL‡

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Structures & Functions of Glycans

Environmental Biofilm Engineering: Harnessing the Power of Biofilms for Contaminant Removal & Resource Recovery

Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier

MONDAY AFTERNOON

P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers E. Lei, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 120. A bioorthogonal ligation of cyclopropeniminium cations and phosphines. T. Heiss, R. Row, J.A. Prescher 1:45 BIOL 121. Cysteine reactivity and functionality across the subcellular universe. D. Bak, M. Pizzagalli, E. Weerapana 2:00 BIOL 122. Targeting the powerhouse of the cell with chemical probes. S.O. Kelley, E. Lei 2:15 BIOL 123. Hypoxia activated small molecule induced gene expression. S.L. Collins, E.M. Hammond, S.J. Conway 2:30 BIOL 124. Utilizing small molecule tools to identify and target structural motifs in an oncogenic long non-coding RNA. A. Donlic, J. Xu, A. Liu, C. Roble, E. McFadden, M. Puri, A.E. Hargrove 2:45 BIOL 125. Highly tunable quinoline-based fluorescent small molecule scaffold for live cell imaging. J.V. Jun, E. Petersson, D.M. Chenoweth 3:00 BIOL 126. Light-activated chemical probing of nucleobase solvent accessibility inside cells. C. Feng, D. Chan, J. Joseph, M. Muuronen, W.H. Coldren, F.U. Furche, C.M. Hadad, R.C. Spitale 3:15 BIOL 127. Tracking of engineered bacteria In Vivo using non-standard amino acid incorporation. P. Praveschotinunt, N. Dorval Courchesne, I. den Hartog, C. Lu, J.J. Kim, N.S. Joshi 3:30 Intermission.

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Precision Genome Engineering

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging

Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Fellow Symposium

SECTION B

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers J. Stubbe, Presiding 8:45 Introductory Remarks. 8:50 BIOL 140. Functional forays in the human gut microbiome. J. Clardy 9:30 BIOL 141. Essential versus vulnerable: Targeting IMP dehydrogenase for antimicrobial therapy. L. Hedstrom 10:10 Intermission. 10:25 BIOL 142. Half-Sites reactivity of ribonucleotide reductase: biochemical and EM structural evidenceα. J. Stubbe, K. Ravichandran, M. Bennati, M.R. Seyedsayamdost, C.L. Drennan, E. Brignole, G. Kang, A. Taguchi 11:05 BIOL 143. New metalloenzyme-catalyzed transformations in natural product biosynthesis. M.R. Seyedsayamdost

SECTION B

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by ANYL and BIOL

SECTION A

Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry

Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by BIOL

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL , COLL and PHYS ‡

Undergraduate Research Posters Biochemistry

Synthetic Chemical Biology

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. Chatterjee, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 BIOL 149. Evolved RNA polymerase biosensors to analyze, control, and reprogram biology. B.C. Dickinson 2:10 BIOL 150. Re-engineering DNA polymerases to recognize xeno-nucleic acids (XNAs). J.C. Chaput 2:45 BIOL 151. A semi-synthetic organism that stores and retrieves increased genetic infomation. F.E. Romesberg 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 BIOL 152. Synthetic biology approaches to biorthogonal chemistry. M. Chang, J. Marchand, M. Neugebauer 4:10 BIOL 153. Synthesis at the interface of virology and genetic code expansion. R. Kelemen, S. Erickson, A. Chatterjee

Sci-Mix

SECTION B

P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 40, 45, 48, 51, 80, 85, 90, 96, 100, 102, 109. See previous listings. 160, 166, 174, 200-201, 214, 227, 234. See subsequent listings.

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by BIOL and SOCED

Environmental Biofilm Engineering: Harnessing the Power of Biofilms for Contaminant Removal & Resource Recovery Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by BIOL

Tetrahedron Prize Sponsored by ORGN, Cosponsored by BIOL, CARB and MEDI

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigators Award Symposium P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers C. C. Aldrich, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 154. Rationally designed antibiotics eliminate multi-drug resistant bacteria. A. Chatterjee 2:05 BIOL 155. Engineering lactic acid bacteria to control infectious diseases. T. Lu

TUESDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Current Topics P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers 6:00 – 8:00 BIOL 158. Tracking dopamine with 19F-MRI/S using pHsensitive false neurotransmitters. M.R. Post, D. Sames, D. Sulzer BIOL 159. Isolation and characterization of aerobic denitrifying bacteria based on activated sludge from refinery wastewater treatment. X. Lang BIOL 160. From synthesis to pathology: Identifying glucosepane’s role in diabetes and aging. M. Streeter, T. Goddard, J. Crawford, D.A. Spiegel BIOL 161. Effects of antifreeze proteins on temperatureinduced enzymatic activity and aggregation. C. Tejeda, R. Vargas, J. Lugo, X. Wen BIOL 162. A visual data mining framework of the genetic code: The DRAm form. J. DeMassa BIOL 163. Microfluidic platforms and tunable surfaces for the creation of biomimetic droplet interface bilayers. J. Korner, K. Elvira BIOL 164. Exponential fluorescent amplification of nucleic acids using clampFISH probes. S.H. Rouhanifard, I. Mellis, M. Dunagin, S. Bayatpour, O. Symmons, A. Cote, A. Raj BIOL 165. Effects of vibrational and structural perturbations on hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. C. Ranasinghe, P.L. Pagano, A. Kohen, C.M. Cheatum BIOL 166. Decoding the self-resistance mechanism of bacteria linked with colorectal cancer. P. Tripathi, E. Shine, A.R. Healy, C. Kim, S. Herzon, J. Crawford, S. Bruner BIOL 167. The allosteric mechanisms driving the evolution of androgen specificity. C.D. Okafor, J. Colucci, E. Ortlund BIOL 168. In vivo bioluminescent imaging of cancer cells by using a bio-orthogonal ligation reaction. T. Almammadov, S. Ozcubukcu, T. Bagci-Onder, S. Kölemen BIOL 169. Molecular mechanisms of collagen C-propeptide assembly. R. Li, A.S. DiChiara, A.S. Hosseini, D.R. McCaslin, M. Shoulders BIOL 170. A novel biodegradable multifunctional nanoplatform synergistically overcome multidrug resistance. S. Wang, L. Yang, Q. Zhang, K. Lee BIOL 171. Water-soluble coelenterazine analogs improved in vivo bioluminescence imaging. H. Yeh, H. Ai BIOL 172. Imaging the proteome through the genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids. J. Wang BIOL 173. Functional interplay between an inward-rectifier potassium channel and the lipid bilayer. B. Wylie, B. Collin, M. Canny, D. Versteeg, M. Yekefallah BIOL 174. Structure-function studies of ferrioxamine siderophores reveals charge-based preference for utilization by human pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus. N.P. Endicott, E. Lee, T.A. Wencewicz BIOL 175. Fast relaxation imaging (FReI) of live-cell RNAprotein binding affinity and kinetics. C. Davis, I. Guzman, M. Gruebele BIOL 176. Investigation of the role of linker domain residues in the function of MshA from Corynebacterium glutamicum, a retaining GT-B glycosyltransferase. W. Chen, P.A. Frantom, C. Petersen BIOL 177. Novel approach for exploring substrate binding and transport via TonB dependent transporters in live Escherichia coli cells using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. T.D. Nilaweera, D.A. Nyenhuis, S.B. Nyenhuis, D.S. Cafiso BIOL 178. Evolving biomolecules through a human cell based continuous directed evolution platform. S.J. Hendel, C. Berman, L. Papa, C.L. Moore, A. Weickhardt, P. Suen, M. Shoulders BIOL 179. Uncovering the quantum mechanical origins of methyltransferase function with large-scale electronic structure. Z. Yang, H.J. Kulik BIOL 180. Binding of human serum albumin to various medications. F. Manyanga, A. Calnan BIOL 181. Photo-triggered fluorescent labelling of recombinant proteins in living cells. Y. Kwon

BIOL 182. Asymmetric cobaltocenium derivatives for mediated electrochemical biocatalysis. J. Najjar, C. McCully, A.K. Udit BIOL 183. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. A. Rullo BIOL 184. Discovery of 4CIN: A universal nucleoside analogue with highly efficient fluorescence properties. K. Passow, D.A. Harki BIOL 185. The influence of a major groove amino acid on the mutagenic potential of 8-oxo-2’-deoxyguanosine with A-family polymerases. M. Hamm BIOL 186. Effect of diagenesis on the Ca/P ratio within archaeological bone and teeth samples. J.W. Ejnik, A. Fernandez, P. Killoran BIOL 187. Single quantum dot tracking and superresolution imaging of plasma membrane organization of the dopamine transporter. O. Kovtun, I.D. Tomlinson, S.J. Rosenthal BIOL 188. Triazine-bridged cyclic peptoids as molecular transporters: Applications in drug delivery. H. Kim, H. Lim BIOL 189. Estrane derivatives induce endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to selective cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells and to tumor regression in PANC-1 xenograft model. D. Poirier, J. Roy, R. Maltais, M. Perreault BIOL 190. Interaction of fluorescent teixobactin analogues with bacteria. M. Morris, M. Malek, M. Hashemian, J.S. Nowick BIOL 191. Regulation of RNA using novel transition metal complexes. S.S. Jain, C.M. Anderson, H.T. Hoang, A. Freer, S. Lundgren BIOL 192. Self-assembly of DNA crystals with tunable spacing. Y. Yang, S. Sun BIOL 193. Investigating the stability of boron-nitrogen heterocycles for the design of robust bioconjugation probes. S. Ghosh, H. Gu, S.L. Bane BIOL 194. Structural characterization of two thiazolineforming cyclization domains in yersiniabactin biosynthesis. J. Soule, Y. Xia, B. Henriquez, A. Gnann, V. Dieu, M. MacRae, M. Patterson, D.P. Dowling BIOL 195. Dissection of the Med25-ATF6α protein-protein interaction using a lipopeptide natural product. O. Pattelli, M. Beyersdorf, A. Tripathi, T. Cierpicki, D.H. Sherman, A.K. Mapp BIOL 196. Investigation of on-resin reactions for cyclization efficiency to control monomer/dimer ratios for comprehensive macrocyclic peptide libraries. R. Kandler, S. Das, A. Nag BIOL 197. Design and synthesis of multifunctional photoaffinity probes to map protein-protein interaction surface. J. Lin, X. Bao, X.D. Li BIOL 198. Fluorogenic structure activity library pinpoints molecular variations in the substrate specificity of structurally hom*ologous esterases. R. Johnson, A. White, A. Koelper, A.F. Russell, E. Larsen, G.C. Hoops BIOL 199. In silico and in vitro studies on the activation and signaling mechanisms of CXCL12 binding to its cognate receptor CXCR4. C. Chang, K. Primus Dass, S. Jiang, H. Hsu BIOL 200. Photochemistry-derived small molecules exhibit cell-line-specific toxicity in pancreatic cancer models. S. Raghavan, B. Hua, S. Gill, R. Ng, W.C. Hahn, S.L. Schreiber BIOL 201. Tagged and remotely induced guided immune responses with a photo-caged NOD1 agonist. A.C. Chon, A. Esser-Kahn BIOL 202. Developing peptide-based inhibitors that target histone post-translational modification mediated proteinprotein interactions. Y. Cui BIOL 203. Squaric esters as novel lysine specific electrophiles. J. Ho, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 204. Growth-based phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) platform to discover drugs that inhibits the proatherogenic trimethylamine (TMA) pathway in the human gut microbiome. W.J. Sandoval Espinola, E. Balskus BIOL 205. Synthesis, characterization and anticancer activity of Au@Cu2MoS4 nanoparticles. N.M. Penman, B. Benin, S. Huang BIOL 206. Therapeutic gene delivery approach to targeting constitutively active pathways in uveal melanoma. O. Dorosheva, J. Zou, R. Liu BIOL 207. Ligand-specific synthetic surfaces for label-free enrichment of cell subpopulations. S. Masuko, D. Mahbuba, A.G. Kruger, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 208. Modular polymeric antigens as antibiotic replacements. C.M. Jarvis, M.K. Arendt, N. Bennett, M. Alam, M. Cook, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 209. Engineering firefly luciferase for improved brightness using modified substrates. M. Ornelas BIOL 210. Identification of volatile organic compounds in breath of liver disease patients by EESI-MS. R. Su

BIOL 211. In silico analysis of protein PgPR-10 with metabolites. Y. Moon, M. Choi, S. Shin BIOL 212. Screening of histamine specific binding peptide for inhibition of allergic reactions. G. Lee, J. Yoon, Y. Kim, J. Min BIOL 213. Polymeric antigens targeting dendritic cells for immunity. H.M. Seifert, C.M. Jarvis, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 214. Fluorogenic chemoselective biocompatible conjugation chemistries of acetylphenyl boronic acid for biological applications. S. Cambray, J. Gao BIOL 215. Nucleophilic probes to enrich the phosphoserine and phosphothreonine proteomes. N. Abularrage, R. Scheck BIOL 216. Metabolic network and mixed-carbohydrate utilization in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5. R.A. Wilkes, L. Aristilde BIOL 217. Small molecule modulator of 20S/26S proteasome dynamic equilibrium targets intrinsically disordered proteins. E. Njomen, P.A. Osmulski, C.L. Jones, T.A. Lansdell, M.E. Gaczynska, J.P. Tepe BIOL 218. Evaluation of surface-modified macrophages toward imaging and drug-delivery. B. Joshi BIOL 219. Small molecule activators of hedgehog protein autoprocessing that tilt reaction outcome toward parasitic hydrolysis. C.J. Smith, L. Cruceta, A.G. Wagner, D.A. Ciulla, J. Zhao, C. Wang, B.P. Callahan BIOL 220. Don’t sell them short: There’s more to bacterial natural products than antibiotics. A.C. Domzalski, A. Velasquez, R. Tavares de Almeida, A. Kawamura BIOL 221. Multiplexed high-throughput screening approach for identification of selective protein-protein interaction modulators. J. Garlick, S.M. Sturlis, A.K. Mapp BIOL 222. An optimal peptide for annealing to damaged collagen. J.M. Dones-Monroig, R.T. Raines BIOL 223. Mutagenesis of the putative catalytic serine of LipN hydrolase from Mycobacterium ulcerans. E. Pool, G.C. Hoops, R. Johnson BIOL 224. Role of F235A residue in neuronal calcium sensor DREAM. M. Santiago, J. Miksovska BIOL 225. NMR guided approach to evolution of Myoglobin protein. J.H. Yoon, S. Bhattacharya, I.V. Korendovych, O.V. Makhlynets BIOL 226. Antibody conjugated ZAIS [(ZnxAgyInz)S2] Fluorescence Nanoparticles for target-specific cell imaging. H. Seo, S. Seol, J. Park, S. Lee, Y. Kim, J. Jung BIOL 227. Microbial glycan recognition by human intelectin-1. C. McMahon, C. Isabella, P. Kosma, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 228. Peptide purification using HILIC (hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography). J.E. Silver, R. Sorgo, A. Darter BIOL 229. Carvedilol increases nuclear localization of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in H9c2 cells. M. Alharbi, J. Gunaje, R. Dachineni, T.M. Seefeldt BIOL 230. Study on the shape and stability of liposome under osmotic pressure and its application to detection of autophagosome. M. Kim, W. Kim, S. Lee, J. Jung BIOL 231. Fish DNA barcoding in Connecticut. J. Pang, A. Fawver BIOL 232. Using llama nanobodies to engineer new protein tools for proximity-directed changes in O-GlcNAcylation of a specific protein. D.H. Ramirez, C. Aonbangkhen, J.A. Naftaly, C. Woo BIOL 233. Characterization of a cyanobacterial “Friedel– Crafts alkylase” enzyme. N.R. Braffman, E.E. Schultz, E. Balskus BIOL 234. Human ribonuclease 1: Endogenous glycosylation, cellular internalization, and cytotoxic capability. V. Ressler, H.R. Kilgore, W. Chyan, R.T. Raines BIOL 235. NMR-guided directed evolution of a Kemp eliminase. S. Bhattacharya, O.V. Makhlynets, A. Volkov, I.V. Korendovych BIOL 236. Development of methods for the continuous directed evolution of biomolecules in human cells. C. Berman, L. Papa, S.J. Hendel, C.L. Moore, P. Suen, M. Shoulders BIOL 237. Development of 31P NMR assay for the kinetic evaluation of recombinant choline kinase from Leishmania infantum. J.A. Walker, S.J. Peters, M.A. Jones, J.A. Friesen BIOL 238. The effect of Li+ binding on secondary and tertiary structure, hydrophobicity, thermodynamics, and interactions with interacting partners of DREAM. S. Azam, J. Miksovska BIOL 239. Targeting virulence factors: Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Haemophilus influenzae IgA1 protease. L. Shehaj, S.K. Choudary, K.M. Makwana, J. Kritzer

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

2:40 BIOL 156. Chemical tools for unraveling parasite biology. E. Derbyshire 3:15 BIOL 157. The challenges of antibacterial drug discovery, development, and commercialization: A fine balancing act of contradictions in terms. J. Leeds

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

BIOL/BMGT/CARB BIOL 240. A colorimetric method for the parallel quantification of choline and phosphocholine. T. Zimmerman, S. Ibrahim BIOL 241. Roles of heparan sulfate in mesendoderm differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. Q. Li, S. Masuko, D. Mahbuba, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 242. Is Leishmania major pteridine reductase (PTR1) a functional monomer? J. Gavenonis, M.G. Johnson BIOL 243. Mapping the interactions between substrate pf3 coat protein and YidC during its translocation. H. He, R.E. Dalbey BIOL 244. Critical roles of heparan sulfate in neuronal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells. D. Mahbuba, S. Masuko, Q. Li, Y. Zaltsman, L.L. Kiessling BIOL 245. Investigation of the catalytic mechanism for ghrelin acylation within ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT). T. Davis, M. Aiduk, J. Hougland

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Early Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers M. E. Farkas, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 BIOL 246. Single-molecule imaging reveals conformational manipulation of Holliday junction DNA by the junction processing protein RuvA. D.R. Gibbs, S. Dhakal 8:50 BIOL 247. New insights Into the ice-binding mechanism of antifreeze glycoproteins. R. Drori, K. Meister, A. DeVries 9:05 BIOL 248. Synthetic biology is an emerging tool for bio/nano-materials. U. Seker 9:20 BIOL 249. Understanding small molecule permeation of bacterial cells: From big data to simple rules? A. Sarkar 9:35 BIOL 250. Chemical proteomic discovery of new agents that induce apoptotic cell death of lung tumor cells. S. Campbell, C.E. Franks, A. Borne, M. Shin, L. Zhang, K. Hsu 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 BIOL 251. Hydralazine induces stress resistance and extends C. elegans lifespan by activating the NRF2/SKN-1 signalling pathway. H. Mirzaei 10:15 BIOL 252. Revealing the amyloid formation mechanism of human beta2-microglobulin induced by transition metal ions. C. Liang 10:30 BIOL 253. Development of modified DNA polymerases for accurate synthesis of nuclease resistant modified DNA. A. Leconte 10:45 BIOL 254. Chemical modulation of circadian rhythms in models of breast cancer. M.E. Farkas 11:00 BIOL 255. Bile acid conjugation as a tool for enhancing intracellular delivery of biofunctional linkerextended constructs. R. Bhadoria, K. Ping, P. Starkov 11:15 BIOL 256. Assessing formation of parallel polyadenosine duplexes composed of two different strands. M. Pickard, L. Cisco, K. Brylow, M. Pershun, E. Wagner, K. Halvorsen, M. Gleghorn

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Mid-Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers E. E. Carlson, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 BIOL 257. Characterization of non-active site, TrkA selective kinase inhibitors and implications on obtaining kinase selectivity. H. Su, K. Rickert, J. Sanders, D. Henze, A. Cooke 9:30 BIOL 258. Ferritin and neuroferritinopathy: Characterization of iron uptake and release. F. Bou-Abdallah, M. Mehlenbacher, M. Poli, P. Arosio, P. Santambrogio, S. Levi, D. Chasteen 9:55 BIOL 259. Discovery of CAT-02-106: An MDR-1 resistant anti-CD22 antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) ligated site-specifically using SMARTag® technology. J. Liu 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 BIOL 260. Ghrelin acylation by ghrelin O-acyltransferase: Exploring the biochemistry of a unique posttranslational modification. J. Hougland, M. Campana, T. Davis, J. Moose, F.J. Irudayanathan, J.D. Chisholm, S. Nangia 11:00 BIOL 261. Intercepting bacterial signaling for antibiotic discovery. E.E. Carlson

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11:25 BIOL 262. Photochemical events in an electron transfer flavoprotein that supports nitrogen fixation. H. Duan, N. Raseek, M. Tokmina-Lukaszewska, C. Lubner, R. Ledbetter, L.C. Seefeldt, P.W. King, B. Bothner, A. Miller

Physicochemical & Biological Phenomena on Sorbent Surfaces in Environmental Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by BIOL

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Frontiers in Organofluorine Research for Biological Chemistry & Drug Discovery P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers R. A. Altman, W. C. Pomerantz, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 263. Engineering new pathways for fluorinated natural products. M. Chang, O. Ad, S. Sirirungruang 2:00 BIOL 264. Design, synthesis and evaluation of fluorovinyl triggers for pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzyme inactivation. D.B. Berkowitz, M.L. Beio, C.D. McCune, J.M. Sturdivant, R.d. Salud-Bea, K.R. Karukurichi 2:30 BIOL 265. Inspiration from fluorination: Chemical biology approaches to probe molecular recognition events in transcription. W.C. Pomerantz 3:00 BIOL 266. Perfluorocarbon-based nanotheranostics. E.M. Sletten 3:20 Intermission. 3:30 BIOL 267. Local fluorine environment: Principle and applications in drug design. A. Vulpetti, C. Dalvit 4:00 BIOL 268. Fluorinated peptidomimetics for improving drug-like characteristics of opioid peptides. R.A. Altman 4:30 BIOL 269. Novel radiofluorination technology to facilitate PET imaging studies and drug discovery. S.H. Liang 4:50 BIOL 270. Fluorination patterns and property modulation for drug discovery. E.M. Carreira 5:30 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Mid-Career Investigators in Biological Chemistry P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers K. Dalby, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 BIOL 271. Industrial enzyme solutions. G. Baier, Y. Lan, R. Andre, S. Kuebelbeck, F. Runge 2:00 BIOL 272. Nucleosome disassembly is heterogeneous and its kinetics is regulated by histone H3K56 acetylation. J. Lee, T. Lee 2:25 BIOL 273. Differences in the heme pocket structure of the L. pectinata hemoglobins elucidated from fluoride binding studies: Understanding the roles of HbI, HbII, and HbIII. J. Cerda, K.M. Frankenfield, K. Williams, D.M. Rivera, J. Lopez Garriga 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 BIOL 274. Biosynthesis of antibiotic natural products in Lysobacter. L. Du 3:30 BIOL 275. In vivo chemical probes of sphingosine kinase function. W.L. Santos 3:55 BIOL 276. Elongation factor 2 kinase integrates multiple signals through regulated calmodulin sensitivity. K. Dalby

Physicochemical & Biological Phenomena on Sorbent Surfaces in Environmental Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by BIOL

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Fellow Symposium P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers A. Justen, Presiding

8:30 BIOL 277. Heparan sulfate in self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells. S. Masuko, Y. Zaltsman, A.C. Elton, Q. Li, P.J. Wrighton, L.L. Kiessling 8:45 BIOL 278. Novel genetically encoded yellow-red FRET biosensors for visualizing cAMP dynamics. S.B. Javdan, M. Wu, B.L. Walton, A.E. Sgro 9:00 BIOL 279. Construction of genetic logic gates using transcriptional interference. A. Escalas Bordoy, N.J. O’Connor, A. Chatterjee 9:15 BIOL 280. Expanding the synthetic utility of the Flavindependent monooxygenase TropB. A. Rodrguiez Benitez, S. Tweedy, S.B. Dockrey, T. Wymore, A.R. Narayan, J.L. Smith 9:30 BIOL 281. DOSEDO: Diversity-oriented synthesis encoded by DNA oligonucleotides. C.J. Gerry, M.J. Wawer, P.A. Clemons, S.L. Schreiber 9:45 BIOL 282. Fluorous photosensitizers enhance photodynamic therapy with perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. R. Day, D. Estabrook, J. Logan, E. Sletten 10:00 BIOL 283. Probing proteomic zinc binding with Zincon. A.A. Mahim, M. Namdarghanbari, D.H. Petering 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 BIOL 284. Chemical tools to decipher gut microbial communities: Detection and characterisation of putative glycyl radical enzymes (GREs). M.U. Luescher, Y.Y. Huang, E. Balskus 10:45 BIOL 285. Conformational dynamics affecting PCET during radical transfer in ribonucleotide reductase. B.L. Greene, A. Taguchi, J. Stubbe, D. Nocera 11:00 BIOL 286. An integrated computational-experimental approach for designing photoswitchable protein assemblies. E. Dolan, S. Mushnoori, M. Dutt, S. Khare 11:15 BIOL 287. Intra-articular injection of relaxin-2 alleviates shoulder arthrofibrosis. W.A. Blessing, S.M. Okajima, J.C. Villa-Camacho, M. Cubria, M.W. Grinstaff, E.K. Rodriguez, A. Nazarian 11:30 BIOL 288. Truncation of a single mycobacterial polysaccharide alters cell shape and compromises fitness. A. Justen, L.L. Kiessling 11:45 BIOL 289. Trapping a Schiff base intermediate in a key tricyclic ring formation step of Wye base biosynthesis. T.A. Grell, A.P. Young, C.L. Drennan, V. Bandarian 12:00 BIOL 290. Necessity of terpene chain length on base pairing discrimination of nature’s selection S-geranyl2-thiouridine. P. Haruehanroengra, S.V. Ranganathan, J. Sheng

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153C

Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Fellow Symposium P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers L. Papa, Presiding 8:30 BIOL 291. Substrate requirements within a family of bacterial phosphothreonine lyases. K. Chambers, R. Scheck 8:45 BIOL 292. Disubstituted luciferins as orthogonal bioluminescent probes. S. Williams, C.M. Rathbun, W.B. Porterfield, Z. Yao, J.A. Prescher 9:00 BIOL 293. Probing the structures of Aβ oligomers with antibodies generated against triangular trimers derived from Aβ. A.G. Kreutzer, S. Yoo, M.N. Diab, I.L. Hamza, J.S. Nowick 9:15 BIOL 294. Structure-activity relationships guided studies for OG:A lesion recognition and repair by the base excision glycosylase MutY. C. Majumdar, A. Manlove, P. McKibbin, M. Hamm, S.S. David 9:30 BIOL 295. Role of histidine and metal binding motifs in the antimicrobial peptide Gaduscidin 1. J. Portelinha, K. Heilemann, A.M. Angeles Boza 9:45 BIOL 296. LOOPER fantastic more than four: Aptamers beyond canonical DNA bases. D. Kong, W. Yeung, R. Hili 10:00 BIOL 297. Effects of small molecule circadian rhythm modulators on oncogenic phenotypes. H. Lin, H. Bisbee, C. Labriola, S. Lellupitiyage Don, K. Robertson, M. Harrington, M.E. Farkas 10:15 Intermission. 10:30 BIOL 298. β,γ-CHX (X: CH3, F, Cl, Br) dATP and dCTP diastereomers: Synthesis, discrete NMR signatures and substrate stereochemistry with DNA polymerase η and β. P. Haratipour, C. Minard, M. Nakhjiri, A. Negahbani, B.A. Kashemirov, K.M. Oertell, M.F. Goodman, C.E. McKenna 10:45 BIOL 299. Highly potent antagonists of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing receptor LasR from a non-native scaffold. D. Manson, M.C. O’Reilly, H.E. Blackwell 11:00 BIOL 300. Immobilized FhuD2 siderophore-binding protein enables purification of salmycin sideromycins from Streptomyces violaceus DSM 8286. G.M. Rivera, C.R. Beamish, T.A. Wencewicz

CRISPR Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by BIOL

Physicochemical & Biological Phenomena on Sorbent Surfaces in Environmental Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by BIOL

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

BMGT

Division Of Business Development & Management A. DeMasi, Program Chair OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: Strengthening Your Patent Rights in Light of Recent Federal Circuit Court Decisions (see CHAL, Sun) SOCIAL EVENTS: Henry F Whaln, Jr. Award to Thomas Lane, 4:00 PM: Mon BUSINESS MEETINGS: Semi-Annual Meeting, 4:00 PM: Mon

SECTION A

SUNDAY MORNING

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153B

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward

Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Fellow Symposium P. C. Bevilacqua, S. O. Kelley, Organizers X. Li, Presiding 1:30 BIOL 305. Dispatching the ubiquitous radical SAM enzymes byproduct 5-deoxyribose. Q. Li, G. Beaudoin, J. Folz, O. Fiehn, J. Goodsell, A. Angerhofer, S. Bruner, A. Hanson 1:45 BIOL 306. Analysis of potassium (K+) efflux systems (Kef) as an antibiotic target in pathogenic bacteria. C.A. Haslam, A.K. Chan, S.C. Grayer, A. Khan, T. Claridge, A.E. Scott, S.J. Conway 2:00 BIOL 307. Uncovering features that control selective protein glycation. N. Sjoblom, R. Scheck 2:15 BIOL 308. Orthogonal site-directed RNA editing system utilizing structure-guided engineering of a proteinRNA interface. L.R. Monteleone, M. Matthews, C. Palumbo, J. Thomas, Y. Zheng, Y. Chiang, A. Fisher, P.A. Beal 2:30 BIOL 309. DNA conjugated catalyst for targeted ester hydrolysis exhibits enzymatic kinetics. M.L. Flanagan, A. Arguello, D. Colman, J. Krejci, Y. Yao, Y. Zhang, D.J. Gorin 2:45 BIOL 310. Synthesis and biological investigation of the narrow-spectrum antibacterial (–)-promysalin and analogs. C. Keohane, A. Steele, W.M. Wuest 3:00 BIOL 311. Bacterial signals regulate multicellularity and mating in animals’ closest relative. J.P. Gerdt, A. Woznica, N. King, J. Clardy 3:15 BIOL 312. Dynamic characteristics of GMP reductase complexes revealed by high-resolution 31P field-cycling NMR relaxometry. M. Rosenberg, A.G. Redfield, M.F. Roberts, L. Hedstrom 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 BIOL 313. Expression of multimeric enzymes with tunable activity and its application in the study of mistranslation. X. Li, Y. Jiang, S. Chong, D.R. Walt 4:00 BIOL 314. Stimulus-responsive self-assembly of enzymatic fractals by computational design. N. Hernandez, W. Hansen, D. Zhu, M. Shea, M. Khalid, V. Manichev, M. Putnins, M. Chen, A.G. Dodge, L. Yang, M. Banal, T. Gustafsson, L. Feldman, S. Lee, L.P. Wackett, W. Dai, S. Khare 4:15 BIOL 315. Geobacter cytochrome OmcZs binds riboflavin: Implications for extracellular electron transfer. M.A. Thirumurthy 4:30 BIOL 316. Enzyme-polymer conjugates to enhance enzyme shelf life in a liquid detergent formulation. S. Kübelbeck, J. Mikhael, H. Keller, R. Konradi, A. AndrieuBrunsen, G. Baier 4:45 BIOL 317. Understanding the long-term fate of nanoparticles using a novel 3D system in vitro. A. Alahmari, K. Dawson, F. Muraca 5:00 BIOL 318. Identifying and utilising new antileishmanial drug targets. R. Charlton, P.G. Steel, P. Denny, B. Rossi Bergmann

Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Advances in Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs: Impact on the Future of the Food & Drug & Agrochemical Industry Cosponsored by AGRO‡ Financially supported by SQA (the Society of Quality Assurance) J. L. Bryant, Organizer K. Daigle, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 BMGT 2. Building of a GLP laboratory through quality training in an academic course. S. Tam, M. Naill 2:00 BMGT 3. Benefits and value in developing a quality management plan. K. Watson 2:25 BMGT 4. Development of standard operating procedures (SOPs) and an effective SOP management system: Practical tools of GLP. L. Sanghani 2:50 Intermission. 3:05 BMGT 5. Practical methods for personnel training and development. K. Daigle 3:30 BMGT 6. Diagnostic of personnel errors in good laboratory practice (GLP) for implementation of effective preventive action. L. Sanghani 3:55 BMGT 7. Role of management in the oversight of laboratories conducting regulated studies. M. Coyle-Rees, C. Lee 4:20 Discussion. 4:50 Concluding Remarks.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 1

Chemical Angel Network: Chemists Investing in Chemical Companies Cosponsored by PROF and SCHB‡ Financially supported by CIEC J. L. Bryant, M. Vreeke, Organizers S. S. White, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks by S. White. 1:35 BMGT 1. Updates and news from the Chemical Angel Network (CaN) and its fifth year of supporting chemists and chemistry-based company creation. M. Vreeke, S.S. White, J.C. Giordan 2:00 Company Presentations. 3:00 Investment Discussion. 3:30 Open Forum. 4:00 Concluding Remarks.

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

MONDAY MORNING Artificial Intelligence & its Impact on The Chemical Enterprise Sponsored by YCC, Cosponsored by BMGT and PRES‡

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

MONDAY AFTERNOON Francis P. Garvan–John M. Olin Medal Symposium in Honor of Valerie Kuck Sponsored by WCC, Cosponsored by BMGT and PROF

TUESDAY MORNING Financial & Business Formation Strategies for StartUps & Chemical-Related Businesses Sponsored by SCHB, Cosponsored by BMGT‡ and PROF

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 1

CARB

Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry S. Sucheck, Program Chair

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

Excellence in Undergraduate Research in Glycoscience Cosponsored by CELL C. L. Grimes, N. L. Snyder, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CARB 1. Microwave-assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) of diamides for antimicrobial structure-activity study in Gram-positive pathogens. L. Rochefort, B.A. Haubrich, M. Saladino, A. Basu, C. Reid 8:25 CARB 2. Synthesis and characterization of polyprenepolysaccharide conjugates via [4+2] cycloaddition intermediates. B.J. Orzolek, P.M. Iovine 8:45 CARB 3. Total synthesis of muramyl dipeptide dimers. T. Harmon, K. Lazor 9:05 Panel Discussion. 9:25 CARB 4. New tools for studying carbohydrate-protein binding interactions. N. Fendler, N.L. Snyder 9:45 CARB 5. Synthesis and characterization of starchdibromomaleimide conjugates for delivery applications. T. Luu, J. Tran, N. Lorentz, P.M. Iovine, J.G. Schellinger 10:05 CARB 6. Development of novel binding reagent for the detection of N-linked glycan disease biomarkers by computational and experimental methods. N. Murphy, R.J. Woods 10:25 CARB 7. Evaluation of sugar coordination to binuclear copper(II) complexes. M. Whaley, S. Striegler 10:45 Panel Discussion. 11:05 CARB 8. Characterization of the novel monoclonal antibody, Kt-IgM-8. G.T. Hymel, P.R. Andreana, K.A. Kleski, K.R. Trabbic 11:25 CARB 9. Targeting ppGalNAc-T3 to block migration and invasiveness of cancer cells. P. Dutta 11:45 CARB 10. Analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor glycosylation by advanced mass spectrometric methods. V.L. Stahl, K.B. Chandler, D.R. Leon, M.A. Kukuruzinska, C.E. Costello 12:05 Concluding Remarks.

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11:15 BIOL 301. Mechanistic basis for ATP-dependent inhibition of glutamine synthetase by Tabtoxinine-β-lactam. L. Fang, G.J. Patrick, J.F. Schaefer, S. Singh, G.R. Bowman, T.A. Wencewicz 11:30 BIOL 302. A common mechanism links physiological activities of microbial butyrate in the colon. M. Fink, M.S. Verma, G. Salmon, N. Fornelos, T. Ohara, S. Ryu, H. Vlamakis, R. Xavier, T. Stappenbeck, G.M. Whitesides 11:45 BIOL 303. Targeting mutations to specific genes in multiple organisms. L.J. Papa, C.L. Moore, M. Shoulders 12:00 BIOL 304. Site-selective generation of stable antibody-drug conjugates via cysteine bridging of native antibodies. S.J. Walsh, S. Omarjee, M. Hyvönen, J. Carroll, D.R. Spring

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CARB Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

Structures & Functions of Glycans Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN C. E. Costello, Organizer I. Compagnon, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CARB 11. Chemical synthesis and isotope labeling to characterize the stereochemistry and complexity of product ions derived from mono- and disaccharides. B. Bendiak 2:10 CARB 12. Systems biology approaches for O-linked glycosylation using LC-MS/MS and microarray technologies. S. Dutta, J. Heimburg-Molinaro, A. Mehta, C. Gao, R. Cummings 2:45 CARB 13. Human milk oligosaccharides: 1000 structures for the first 1000 days. B. Stahl 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 CARB 14. Carbohydrate sequencing by electronic excitation dissociation. C. Lin, Y. Tang, J. Wei, P. Hong, C.E. Costello 4:10 CARB 15. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange – mass spectrometry of rapidly exchanging functional groups: Towards analyses of solvated glycan structures. E.S. Gallagher, O.T. Liyanage, H.J. Kim 4:45 CARB 16. Glycan fingerprinting using cold-ion infrared spectroscopy. E. Mucha, M. Marianski, W. Struwe, P.H. Seeberger, G. von Helden, K. Pagel

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

General Posters Cosponsored by CELL S. J. Sucheck, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 CARB 17. Revealing the molecular mechanisms of human 6-O-endosulfatase specificity. B. Timm, M.L. Huang, S. Verespy, K. Godula CARB 18. Interrupted Pummerer reaction mediated glycosylations: Total synthesis of resin glycoside murucoidins. J. Fang, J. Sun, S. Zhang, P. Shu, X. Xiao, P. Wu, G. Nie, L. Meng, J. Zeng, Q. Wan CARB 19. Wound healing effects of β-glucan. M. Cho, G. Seo, Y. Kim, S. Choi, S. Park CARB 20. Guar gum-poly (vinyl acetate) graft copolymers as a potential environmentally friendly warp-sizing agent. J. Xu, Q. Wang, X. Fan CARB 21. β-Selective D-psicofuranosylation of alcohols, pyrimidine bases, and thiols. A. Ueda, Y. Makura, Y. Nishimura, M. Tanaka, J. Uenishi CARB 22. Chemo-enzymatic synthetic method of sequenceregulated keratan sulfate oligosaccharides catalyzed by keratanase II. Y. Yamazaki, S. Kimura, M. Ohmae CARB 23. Designing galactonoamidines as inhibitors of α-galactosidases. I. Orizu, S. Striegler CARB 24. Glycoside cleavage via crosslinked microgel catalysts. B. Sharma, S. Striegler CARB 25. Assessing fucosyltransferase activity via MSn. D.J. Ashline, V.N. Reinhold CARB 26. Synthesis of HBA glyco-conjugates for capturing human noroviruses. A. Dhawane, B. Gurale, H. Dinh, S.S. Iyer

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CARB 27. Microgram scale synthesis of Glycopeptide Libraries: Use as standards and in screening. A.Y. Mehta, S. Dutta, M.S. Hanes, R.H. Veeraiah, C. Gao, Y. Matsumoto, N.L. Pohl, M. Boyce, R. Cummings CARB 28. Injectable DNA supramolecular hydrogel vaccine system for immunotherapy. Y. Li CARB 29. Free energy calculation of the solubility of cellulose oligomers in water: II. K. Ueda, Y. Matsubara CARB 30. Selective hydrogenation of lactose to lactitol over Ru nanoparticles embedded on NiO modified TiO2 used as support material. J. Hwang, J. Jegal CARB 31. Mesoporous sulfated titania as an efficient catalyst for selective dehydration of sorbitol to isosorbide. J. Hwang, J. Jegal, A. Dabbawala CARB 32. Tools to probe the SAR in cADPR: conformational analysis of cAPDR and cIDPR analogs and a potential photoaffinity label. I. Serrano, W. Lyu, T.J. Perez, S.M. Graham CARB 33. Phenanthroline catalyzed highly diastereoselective glycosylation. F. Yu CARB 34. Complex carbohydrate synthesis at a PUI in Central Minnesota. A. Pirinelli, D. Schultz, A. Haley, R. Ulrich, S. Benz, S. Scherbring CARB 35. One strep at a time: Chemogenomic screening of antimicrobial diamides in Streptococcus pneumoniae. S. Nayyab, B.A. Haubrich, M. Saladino, J. Belval, S.B. Symington, A. Basu, C. Reid CARB 36. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of O-mannose glycans. S. Wang, Q. Zhang, L. Li, P.G. Wang CARB 37. Understanding the biological role of parasitic N-glycans using microarrays. B. Eckmair, F. Martini, K. Paschinger, I. Wilson CARB 38. Synthesis of fluorinated glucopyranose derivatives from levoglucosan. J. St-Gelais, D. Lainé, D. Giguère CARB 39. En route to carbohydrate-based antifungal and antitumor vaccines. T. Tremblay, V. Denavit, D. Giguère CARB 40. Synthesis of fluorinated carbohydrates: Preparation of mono- and polyfluorogalactopyranoside analogs. D. Laine, V. Denavit, D. Giguère CARB 41. Conjugation of carbohydrates to proteins using di(triethylene glycol monomethyl ether) squaric acid ester revisited. P. Xu, M.N. Trinh, P. Kovac CARB 42. XBP1s activation globally remodels N-glycan distribution. K. Chen, M. Wong, M. Shoulders CARB 43. Biomarker-based metabolic labeling for redirected and enhanced immune response. S. Li, B. Yu, P.G. Wang, B. Wang CARB 44. Extending the use of silyl protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry. S. Kamburugamuwe, M. Brichacek CARB 45. Synthesis of novel benzylidene derivatives and evaluation of ring opening properties. S. Ramberan, N.K. Jalsa CARB 46. Exploration of triazolyl-1,2-cyclohexane-hydroxydicarboxylic acids and triazolyl-cyclohexanols as potential regulators for glycosidases. M.R. Ruyonga, B. Nguyen, M. Huey, N.M. Samoshina, V.V. Samoshin CARB 47. Synthetic N-acetyl sialic acid-based chemical biology probes for exploring the biology of O-acetyl sialic acids. W. Li, A. Xiao, Y. Li, H. Yu, X. Chen CARB 48. Importance of aromatic residues in proteincarbohydrate interactions. R. Diehl, K.L. Hudson, G. Bartlett, D.N. Woolfson, L.L. Kiessling CARB 49. Evaluation of Kinetic behaviors of O-GlcNAlk toward human OGA and its bacterial hom*olog BtGH84. E.J. Kim, J. Hanover, M.R. Bond, D. Kang, J. Lee CARB 50. Stereoselective synthesis of the branched trisaccharide fragment of the antibiotic saccharomicin B. S.E. Soliman, C. Bennett CARB 51. Tailoring leaving group ability to glycan reactivity for stereospecific glycosylation reactions. M. Zhuo, C. Bennett CARB 52. Progress on the total synthesis of saccharomicin B. M. Bylsma, C. Bennett CARB 53. Developing immunotherapies for pancreatic cancers. K.R. Trabbic, K. Whalen, K. Abarca Heidemann, L. Xia, J. Gildersleeve, J.J. Barchi CARB 54. Improved approach to the direct construction of 2-deoxy-β-linked sugars: Applications toward oligosaccharide synthesis. D.L. Lloyd, C. Bennett CARB 55. Direct stereoselective synthesis of the tetrasaccharide fragment corresponding to saccharomicins B. M. Jana CARB 56. Effort toward assembly of chondroitin sulfate A bearing syndecan-1 glycopeptide. S. Ramadan, W. Yang, Z. Zhang, X. Huang

CARB 57. New methods for directed evolution of glycoconjugates targeting broadly-neutralizing HIV antibodies. R. Redman, J. Temme, I.S. MacPherson, I.J. Krauss CARB 58. Naturally derived glycan array from CHO cells to study influenza viral infection. S. Chauhan, L. Parsons, S. Yang, E. Jankowska, C. Kohnhorst, C. Agarabi, J.F. Cipollo CARB 59. Elicitation Of antibody responses in rabbits by immunization with glycopeptide conjugates that mimic an epitope of bnAb 2G12. D.N. Nguyen, B. Xu, C. Armstrong, I.J. Krauss CARB 60. Synthesis of C-3 carbohydrate exo-cyclic enones via condensation of dihydrolevoglucosenone with adamantyl aldehyde. C. Oldt, Z.J. Witczak, R. Bielski, D.E. Mencer CARB 61. New developments in picoloylated sialyl donors. A. Behm, M. Shadrick, C. De Meo CARB 62. Preparation of deoxy-sugars through a gold-catalyzed Petasis-Ferrier-like reaction. W.M. Miller, C. Bennett CARB 63. Synthesis of C-3-carbohydrate exo-cyclic enones with chromone moiety. Z.J. Witczak, R. Bielski, D.E. Mencer CARB 64. Increasing the immunogenicity of the TF carbohydrate antigen utilizing the bivalent Tn/TF-PS A1 entirely carbohydrate vaccine construct. K.A. Kleski, K.R. Trabbic, M. Shi, J. Bourgault, P.R. Andreana CARB 65. In vitro selection of glycopeptides that bind to broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies using mRNA display for vaccine design. S. Horiya, J.K. Bailey, J. Temme, I.J. Krauss CARB 66. Synthesis of modified pseudouridines, as novel nucleoside-analog inhibitors of bacterial RNA polymerase. I. Sappy CARB 67. Studies toward the synthesis of novel anasmacrolides. V.R. Sammeta, Z. Murphy, S. Rasapalli, R. Alshehry CARB 68. Promoter controlled glycosylation of 2-deoxy sugars: Synthesis of the saquayamycin-Z pentasaccharide. C. Mizia CARB 69. The MG System, a new enzymatic tool in bioconjugate chemistry. G. Cutolo, F. Reise, R. Nehme, P. Lafite, P. Renard, M. Schuler, T.K. Lindhorst, A. Tatibouêt CARB 70. Characterization of N-glycan moieties in plasma IgY from Dumetella carolinensis via mass spectrometry. J. Ebeid, R. Smith, M. Hatch, D.J. Ashline, V.N. Reinhold, K.A. Stumpo CARB 71. Preparation and application of an environmentally friendly starch-based adsorbent in the removal of Hg (II) from aqueous solution. J. Li, L. Pu, W. Xiao, H. Long CARB 72. Synthesis and development of bacteria cell wall fragment microarray and its application. J. Zhou, K. Lazor, C.L. Grimes

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

Structures & Functions of Glycans Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN I. Compagnon, Organizer C. E. Costello, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CARB 73. HIV glycosylation. L. Cao, J.K. Diedrich, M. Pauthner, R. Andrabi, K. Rantalainen, Z. Berndsen, D. Kulp, S. Menis, L. He, R. Park, D. Sok, C.Y. Su, C. Delahunty, A.B. Ward, W.R. Schief, D. Burton, J.R. Yates, J.C. Paulson 8:40 CARB 74. Glycosylation impacts antibody Fc receptor function and is tuned by the immune system. N. Mehta, K.B. Chandler, C.E. Costello, G. Alter 9:15 CARB 75. N-Glycans’s role in antibody allosteric signal transduction. J. Zhao, R. Nussinov, B. Ma 9:30 CARB 76. Mapping and manipulating O-GlcNAc during T cell activation. C. Woo 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 CARB 77. Elucidation of host interactions of biofilm component poly-N-acetylglucosamine from Staphylococcus aureus and Acetinobacter baumanii using glycomics microarrays. M. Kilcoyne 10:55 CARB 78. Conformational modelling of fungal mannan polysaccharide antigens: Implications for the rational design of anti-fungal vaccines. M. Kuttel

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials CNC/CNF Nanocellulose Composites Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A

9:05 CARB 90. Glycan complexity and biological recognition. G. Boons 9:35 CARB 91. Bacterial enzymes for one-pot multienzyme (OPME) chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates. X. Chen 10:05 CARB 92. Synthesis and characterization of a protein-polymer surfactant nanoconjugate of Cel7A from Trichoderma reesei. J.N. Pedersen, B. Pérez, Z. Guo 10:25 Intermission. 10:45 CARB 93. Structural basis for mammalian glycoenzyme substrate specificity. K. Moremen, R. Kadirvelraj, J. Yang, B. Boruah, J. Sanders, L. Liu, Y. Xiang, K. Karaveg, A. Ramiah, P. Prabhakar, G. Boons, Z. Wood 11:15 CARB 94. FtsW is a peptidoglycan polymerase. S. Walker 11:45 CARB 95. Engineering a multifunctional family 5 glycosyl hydrolase into a transglycosidase. C. Bandi, A. Goncalves, S. Chundawat

SECTION B Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 1

Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health

Structures & Functions of Glycans

Cosponsored by CELL R. Cummings, Organizer V. Reinhold, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 CARB 96. Glycoprotein and carbohydrate-based drugs for human health. R. Cummings 9:35 CARB 97. Synthesis of pseudaminic acid glycosides for potential applications in the treatment of bacterial infections. B. Dhakal, D. Crich 10:05 CARB 98. O-specific polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O139: Improved synthesis and conjugation to BSA by squaric acid chemistry. H.B. Pfister, X. Lu, S.E. Soliman, P. Kováč 10:35 Intermission. 10:50 CARB 99. Physicochemical characterization of a Shigella flexneri serotype 2a bioconjugate vaccine candidate. N. Ravenscroft, M. Braun, J. Schneider, A. Dreyer, S. Kemmler, M. Steffen, D. Sirena, M. Wacker, M. Kowarik 11:20 CARB 100. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of fluorine-18 labeled streptozotocin derivative as a pancreatic beta-cell imaging probe. K. Arimitsu, H. Kimura, Y. Yagi, K. Koshino, M. Hirano, T. Higuchi, H. Yasui 11:50 CARB 101. Post glycosylation diversification (PGD), a new approach to the synthesis of glycosylated small molecule compound libraries, and its application towards novel bioactive compounds containing amino sugars. Z. Cannone, C. Lorenc, A. Shaqra, S. Keshipeddy, V. Robinson, D. Wright, M.W. Peczuh

Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN I. Compagnon, C. E. Costello, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CARB 81. Fragment-based approaches for the determination of stereochemistry glycoconjugates using hyphenated IM-MS. S. Flitsch 2:10 CARB 82. Towards understanding the mechanism of the fucose migration in small oligosaccharides using first-principles methods. M. Marianski, E. Mucha, M. Lettow, D. Thomas, G. von Helden, P.H. Seeberger, K. Pagel 2:25 CARB 83. Toward computational glycobiology. W. Im 2:40 CARB 84. Conformational analysis on five membered ring by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Relationships between constant couplings, chemical shift and dihedral angles. C. Mitan, R.M. Moriarty, P. Filip, E. Bartha, C. Draghici, M. Caproiu 2:55 Intermission. 3:15 CARB 85. Simple MSn sequence in tandem mass spectrometry for de novo structural determination of glucose- galactose- mannose- oligosaccharides. C.K. Ni 3:30 CARB 86. Elucidating native sialylated N-glycans isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. C. Liew 3:45 CARB 87. Plant polysaccharides: Insights on structureproperty-function correlations using mass spectrometric approaches. F. Vilaplana 4:20 CARB 88. Chemical biology of plant cell wall glycans. M. Clausen 4:35 CARB 89. Single-molecule characterization of protein adsorption to multivalent glucan polymers like cellulose. S. Chundawat, B. Nemmaru, M. Hilton, M. Hackl, C. Lopez, S. Gnanakaran, M. Lang

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials Nanoparticle Structures & Properties Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Synthesis of Renewable Materials Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

SECTION A

Tetrahedron Prize

Enzymes in Glycoscience

Sponsored by ORGN, Cosponsored by BIOL, CARB and MEDI

Cosponsored by CELL L. Wang, Organizer G. Boons, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 CARB 102. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of hom*ogeneous glycoproteins. L. Wang 2:30 CARB 103. Macrocyclic peptide inhibitors of carbohydrate-active enzymes. S. Jongkees 3:00 CARB 104. Enzymatic synthesis of glycoproteins and protein glycan interactions. T.J. Tolbert 3:20 Intermission. 3:40 CARB 105. Discovery of CAZYmes for cell surface glycan removal through metagenomics: Towards universal blood. S.G. Withers 4:10 CARB 106. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of peptidoglycan building blocks for cell wall remodeling. C.L. Grimes 4:40 CARB 107. Study of galactonoamidines as transition state analogs of glycosidases. J.B. Pickens, S. Striegler 5:00 CARB 108. Glycosyltransferase bump-hole engineering to dissect mucin-type O-glycosylation in the living cell. B. Schumann, M. Debets, S.P. Wisnovsky, A.J. Agbay, L.J. Wagner, J. Choi, M.A. Gray, C.R. Bertozzi 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix S. J. Sucheck, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 17, 24, 26-28, 33, 36, 39, 41-42, 45, 47, 49, 52-53, 56, 64-66, 72. See previous listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

Enzymes in Glycoscience Cosponsored by CELL G. Boons, Organizer L. Wang, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks.

SECTION B Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 1

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health Cosponsored by CELL V. Reinhold, Organizer R. Cummings, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 CARB 109. Well-defined heparan sulfate mimicking glycopolymers as inhibitors of heparanase for cancer therapeutics. H.M. Nguyen 2:05 CARB 110. Chiral gold nanoparticle glycoconjugate synthesis and their anticancer and antibacterial applications relying on carbohydrate-lectin interactions. I. Yazgan, A. Ugurlu, T. Ceter, A. Akgul 2:35 CARB 111. Use of bioorthogonal N-acetylcysteamine (SNAc) analogues and peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B (PatB) to label bacterial peptidoglycan. K. Lazor, Y. Wang, K. DeMeester, H. Liang, T. Heiss, C.L. Grimes 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 CARB 112. Short carbohydrate amphiphiles as smart therapeutics targeting cancer. A.M. Brito, D. Soares da Costa, A.F. Carvalho, R. Reis, R. Ulijn, R. Pires, I. Pashkuleva 3:50 CARB 113. Co-assembly of peptide and carbohydrate amphiphiles to generate proteoglycan mimics. A. Brito, Y. Abul-Haija, D. Soares da Costa, R. Novoa-Carballal, R. Reis, R. Ulijn, R. Pires, I. Pashkuleva 4:20 CARB 114. Comprehensive glycan sequencing with documented results. V. Reinhold

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials New Applications Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis Cosponsored by CELL C. Bennett, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 CARB 115. Establishing glycosylation structurereactivity-stereoselectivity relationships. J. Codee 9:30 CARB 116. Synthesis of oligosaccharide components of the outer core domain of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide using a multifunctional hydroquinone-derived reducing-end capping group. A. Vartak, S.J. Sucheck, F.M. Hefny 9:55 CARB 117. β-Mannosylation via cesium carbonatemediated anomeric O-alkylation: Mechanistic studies and synthetic applications. J. Zhu 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 CARB 118. Synthesis of the Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285/NCTC 9343 capsular zwitterionic polysaccharide PS A1 repeating units of oligomeric length and their importance. P. Eradi, S. Ghosh, P.R. Andreana 11:05 CARB 119. Visible-light activated high diastereoselective glycosylation. F. Yu, H.M. Nguyen 11:30 CARB 120. O-Glycosylation using a versatile remote activation strategy. J.R. Ragains

SECTION B Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 1

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health R. Cummings, Organizer V. Reinhold, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 CARB 121. Glycocalyx remodeling with sialylatedglycomaterials to probe the role of glycan presentation on influenza A host recognition. C.J. Fisher, M. Cohen, M.L. Huang, P. Gagneux, K. Godula 9:35 CARB 122. Facile glycopeptide synthesis using glycoamino acid with O-Boc protection. T. Tanaka, A. Matsuda, M. Mizuno 10:05 CARB 123. Glycopeptide positive control for acid hydrolysis of glycoproteins to determine monosaccharide content. S. Patil, J. Rohrer 10:35 Intermission. 10:55 CARB 124. Glucuronic acid stabilizing short peptides into helix. C. Wu, H.N. Hoang, L. Liu, D.P. Fairlie

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11:10 CARB 79. Straightforward synthesis and multiplexed screening of N-glycan polymers with micropillar/microwell chip platform. J. White, P. Bigdelou, J. Tang, K. Yu, K. Chan, D. Wang, M. Lee, X. Sun 11:25 CARB 80. Surface immobilized polymeric glycomaterials for the attenuation of growth factor signaling and proliferation in human mesenchymal stem cells. G.W. Trieger, K. Godula

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CARB/CATL 11:25 CARB 125. HPAE-PAD analysis of complex carbohydrates using dual eluent generation cartridge. B. Huang, Y. Chen, J. Hu, J. Rohrer 11:55 CARB 126. Synthesis, conformation and potential applications of a range of glycosyl phosphoramidates. A. Subratti, N.K. Jalsa

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

Solid-Phase Chemoenzymatic Methods for Analysis of Sialylated Glycans & their Intact Glycopeptides Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by CARB

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Summer 2

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis Cosponsored by CELL C. Bennett, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 CARB 127. Catalytic stereoselective synthesis of glycosides. M.G. Galan 2:30 CARB 128. Continuous flow synthesis of glycosylated cysteine monomers and S-glycosylated antimicrobial peptides. A.J. Mijalis, R.H. Veeraiah, B.L. Pentelute, N.L. Pohl 2:55 CARB 129. Synthesis of polyfluorinated hexopyranoses. D. Laine, D. Giguère, V. Denavit 3:20 Intermission. 3:35 CARB 130. Employing cell-surface glyco-engineering to elucidate the role of matriglycan from α-dystroglycan. C. Capicciotti, M. Sheikh, L. Wells, G. Boons 4:00 CARB 131. Selective catalytic methods for the synthesis of oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates. M. Walczak 4:30 CARB 132. Stereospecific and site-selective glycosylation reactions catalyzed by Bis-Thioureas. E.N. Jacobsen

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

THURSDAY MORNING Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

CATL

Division of Catalysis Science and Technology F. Tao and K. Ramasamy, Program Chairs SOCIAL EVENTS: CATL Social Hour, 6:00 PM: Mon BUSINESS MEETINGS: CATL Executive Board Meeting, 5:00 PM: Mon

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

106

Role of Water & Solvent in Heterogeneous Catalysis K. A. Stoerzinger, Organizer L. Arnadottir, Z. Feng, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 1. Influencing reaction pathways by chemical and steric environment in liquid phase acid catalysis. Y. Liu, J.A. Lercher 8:30 CATL 2. Elucidating the oxygen reduction volcano in alkaline and acidic electrolytes. M. Escudero-Escribano 8:50 CATL 3. The role of dopant concentration and electrolyte pH on the performance of LaFexCo1-xO3 catalysts for oxygen reduction/evolution reaction. Z. Feng, M. Wang 9:10 CATL 4. How fast are the proton and electron transfers on RuO2? A Ru-OH deprotonation study. D. Kuo, H. Paik, D. Schlom, J. Suntivich 9:30 Intermission. 9:50 CATL 5. Structure and dynamics of liquid water on anatase TiO2(101). M.C. Andrade, H. Ko, R. Car, A. Selloni 10:20 CATL 6. Molecular-level insights into the role of water on the chemistry of sugar alcohol decompositions revealed by multiscale modeling. C.J. Bodenschatz, X. Zhang, T. Xie, R.B. Getman 10:50 CATL 7. QuickEXAFS study of Pd leaching from solid catalysts in liquid environment. M. Newton, D. Ferri, M. Hii 11:10 CATL 8. Palladium-catalyzed reductive solvolysis of aryl ethers. M. Wang, O.Y. Gutiérrez, D.M. Camaioni, J.A. Lercher

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Understanding Catalytic Sites on Amorphous & Disordered Materials B. R. Goldsmith, A. Kulkarni, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 9. Elucidating the multi-functionality of Ag-ZrO2/ SiO2 catalysts in the single-step thermal conversion of ethanol to butadiene. S.A. Akhade, V. Lebarbier Dagle, R. Dagle, A.B. Padmaperuma, V. Glezakou, R. Rousseau 8:40 CATL 10. Simple characterization of solid acid catalysts by reactive gas chromatography. O.A. Abdelrahman, P.J. Dauenhauer 9:10 Intermission. 9:25 CATL 11. Highly tunable platform for biomimetic catalysts from nanocrystal-amorphous polymer composites. M. Cargnello, A.R. Riscoe, C. Wrasman, A. Aitbekova, E.D. Goodman, A. Herzing, S. Bare 10:05 CATL 12. Tuning the molecular design of tertiary amine catalysts on amorphous mesoporous silica supports for glucose isomerization. N.A. Brunelli, N. Deshpande, T. Kobayashi, C. Yang, E. Cho, M. Whitaker, L. Lin, M. Pruski 10:45 CATL 13. Spatial relationships between “isolated” active sites in catalysts built on amorphous silica surfaces. S.L. Scott

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

Catalytic Insights from In-Situ/Operando X-ray & Neutron Techniques X-ray Catalysis M. Tada, Organizer F. Tao, Z. Wu, Organizers, Presiding M. Cargnello, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 14. In-situ catalyst characterization at Stanford synchrotron radiation lightsource (SSRL): What’s new? S.R. Bare, A.S. Hoffman, A. Boubnov 8:40 CATL 15. Identifying dynamic structural changes of active sites in Pt-Ni bimetallic catalyst using multimodal approaches. Y. Li, D. Liu, J.G. Chen, E. Stach, R.G. Nuzzo, A. Frenkel 9:15 CATL 16. Study surface of catalyst nanoparticles using synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. F. Tao, L. Nguyen, L. Gregoratti, M. Amati, M. Al-Hada, H. Sezen 9:50 Intermission. 10:00 CATL 17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of some metal nanocatalysts. P. Zhang 10:35 CATL 18. Elucidating ultrafast electron dynamics at surfaces using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) reflection-absorption spectroscopy. L. Baker 11:10 CATL 19. Catalysts for low-temperature hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide oxidation: In-situ/operando structural characterizations of the catalytic pathways. S. Shan, J. Li, H. Kareem, Z. Wu, J. Luo, S. Wang, J. Luo, D. Tran, C. O’Brien, I. Lee, V. Petkov, C. Zhong 11:35 CATL 20. About observing active sites with in situ and operando characterization. J. van Bokhoven

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Application of Electron Microscopy to Catalysis Studies Visualization of Catalyst Structure with Electron Microscopy H. Liu, Organizer J. R. Jinschek, F. Tao, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 21. Atomic-scale study of bimetallic nanocatalysts by aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Y. Yu, P. Yang 8:25 CATL 22. Structure of Ziegler-Natta catalysts revealed by low-dose transmission electron microscopy. D.F. Yancey, C. Kisielowski, P. Specht, J. Kang, S. Rozeveld, P. Nickias 9:05 CATL 23. Time resolved and atomic resolution environmental TEM of metal surface in gas environment. S. Takeda, H. Yoshida, N. Kamiuchi, T. Tamaoka, R. Aso 9:45 Intermission. 9:55 CATL 24. In situ investigation of the evolution of layered chalcogenide catalysts during synthesis and processing. M. McDowell, N. Kondekar, M. Boebinger 10:30 CATL 25. New insights into the activation and deactivation of gold/ceria-zirconia in the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction. J. Carter, X. Liu, Q. He, S. Althahban, E. Nowicka, S. Freakley, L. Niu, D. Morgan, Y. Li, S. Golunski, C. Kiely, G. Hutchings 11:05 CATL 26. Use of transmission electron microscopy for industrial solid catalysts. C. Akatay 11:40 CATL 27. Structural evolution of metal nanoparticles in operando conditions. Y. Gao, B. Zhu

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

Catalysis for Transformation of Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen to Chemical & Fuel Feedstock J. Huang, Organizer, Presiding Y. Jiang, Presiding 8:00 CATL 28. Thermal and light effect in plasmonic catalysis. X. Zhang, L.X. Li, W. Yang, H. Everitt, J. Liu 8:40 CATL 29. Metal clusters, surface defects, and photoexcited electrons for CO2 photoreduction. S. Iyemperumal, J. Chen, T. Pham, G. Li, N.A. Deskins 9:00 CATL 30. High temperature catalysis at low bulk temperatures using sunlight and nanoparticles: Photothermal production of methane and water from CO2 and hydrogen. T.M. Steeves, A. Esser-Kahn 9:20 CATL 31. Plasmon-assisted Ru catalyzed hydrogenation of CO2 to CH4 using sunlight as energy source. P. Buskens, F. Sastre Calabuig, N. Meulendijks, J. Sweelssen, K. Elen, M. Verheijen 9:40 CATL 32. Surface reconstruction of tin-doped ceria nanorods for the photocatalytic reduction of CO2. T. Martin, Z. Wang, K. Tan, Y.J. Chabal, B.S. Guiton, K.J. Balkus 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 CATL 33. Electroreduction of CO2 catalyzed by a heterogenized Zn−porphyrin complex with a redox-innocent metal center. Y. Wu, J. Jiang, Z. Weng, M. Wang, D. Broere, Y. Zhong, G.W. Brudvig, Z. Feng, H. Wang 10:40 CATL 34. Reactivity and mechanism of carbon dioxide reduction at supported metal phthalocyanines. K. Manthiram 11:00 CATL 35. Preparation and activity studies of supported metal sulfide clusters. Y. Ma, M. Xue, M.G. White 11:20 CATL 36. Quasi-2D Pd/Pt nanoclams for CO2 reduction in tandem with microbial communities. A.B. Wong, F. Kracke, A.D. Antoniuk-Pablant, C. Hahn, A. Spormann, T.F. Jaramillo 11:40 CATL 37. The origin of the elusive first intermediate of CO2 electroreduction. I. Chernyshova, P. Somasundaran, S. Ponnurangam

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level W. Huang, F. Tao, Organizers C. Tsung, Organizer, Presiding Y. Zhang, Presiding 8:00 CATL 38. Design and computational study of active sites in metal-organic frameworks for oxidation of alkanes. R. Snurr

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

Role of Water & Solvent in Heterogeneous Catalysis K. A. Stoerzinger, Organizer L. Arnadottir, Z. Feng, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 46. Calculations of electrochemical reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons and alcohols. J. Hussain, E. Skúlason, H. Jonsson 1:30 CATL 47. In situ and operando investigations of electrochemical interfaces using ambient pressure XPS. E. Crumlin 2:00 CATL 48. Enhancing interface sensitivity of energy materials by resonant X-Ray scattering. I. Cordova, G. Freychet, G. Su, C. Wang 2:20 Intermission. 2:40 CATL 49. Role of surfaces and adsorbed water in indoor and outdoor air chemistry. V.H. Grassian 3:10 CATL 50. Role of water in oxidation of small molecules: Insights from in-situ spectroscopy. K. Akkiraju, D. Weinberger, W.F. Ruettinger, Y. Shao-Horn 3:30 CATL 51. Density functional theory study of the decarboxylation and decarbonylation of acetic acid over Pd (111). K. Chuckwu, S. Seekins, L. Arnadottir 3:50 CATL 52. Controlling solvent effects on heterogeneous catalysts with surface organic groups: Structure-activity relationships for pseudo-solvent effects. D. SingappuliArachchige, J.S. Manzano, I.I. Slowing 4:10 CATL 53. Solvent effects in acid and metal catalyzed reaction systems. M. Neurock, C. Sanpitakseree, P. Bai

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Understanding Catalytic Sites on Amorphous & Disordered Materials B. R. Goldsmith, A. Kulkarni, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 54. Computational insights into structure and catalytic properties of group VI metal oxides on amorphous silica. J. Handzlik 1:40 CATL 55. Interaction of nickel and amorphous aluminosilicate in heterogeneous oligomerization catalysts. F. Nadolny, F. Alscher, S. Peitz, R. Franke, C. Breitkopf, W. Reschetilowski 2:00 CATL 56. Self-sustaining and hysteresis behavior of low-temperature CO oxidation on mesoporous Pd/SiO2 aerogel s catalyst under dynamics conditions. K.M. Saoud, R. Al Soubaihi, J. Dutta 2:20 CATL 57. MCAT-53TM as a novel and first of its class Ruthenium based catalyst. Synthesis of intermediate of Anacetrapib (a CETP inhibitor) in water instead of organic solvents using MCAT-53TM. A. Mehta, B. Saha, A.A. Koohang, M. Chorghade 2:40 Intermission. 2:55 CATL 58. Surface-mounted cluster catalysts: dynamic ensemble nature, and dominance of rare metastable sites in defining catalytic activity, selectivity, and durability. A. Alexandrova 3:35 CATL 59. Characterization of amorphous silica based catalysts and materials using DFT modeling tools. F. Tielens

4:15 CATL 60. Toward an understanding of initiation in the Phillips catalyst. C. Vandervelden, A. Fong, Y. Wang, S.L. Scott, B. Peters

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

Catalytic Insights from In-Situ/Operando X-ray & Neutron Techniques X-ray Catalysis M. Tada, Z. Wu, Organizers F. Tao, Organizer, Presiding Y. Li, P. Zhang, Presiding 1:00 CATL 61. Using x-rays to determine the role of support in hydrogen spillover. J. van Bokhoven 1:40 CATL 62. Well-defined nanocrystals catalysts as active phases and premier materials for spectroscopic studies of catalyst restructuring. M. Cargnello, E.D. Goodman, A. Aitbekova, C.J. Wrasman, A.R. Riscoe, A. Yang, F. AbildPedersen, S. Bare 2:15 CATL 63. In-situ characterization of promoted Rhbased catalysts for ethanol synthesis. P.C. Carrillo, R. Shi, M.G. White 2:40 Intermission. 2:50 CATL 64. Catalytic surface chemistry studied with synchrotron radiation-based x-ray techniques. W. Huang 3:30 CATL 65. In situ XPS as a surface probe for C-H reforming reactions over M-Ceria (M=Co, Ni) catalysts. S.D. Senanayake, Z. Liu, F. Zhang, J. Rodriguez 4:05 CATL 66. Operando study of Cu single site, dimers and clusters over ceria surface. F.R. Wang 4:30 CATL 67. Direct comparison of structure-activityrelationship in ceria by experiment and theory. T. Duchon, D. Mueller, C.M. Schneider, S. Nemsak 4:55 CATL 68. The secret life of Al2O3 supported platinum nanoparticles during CO/O2 redox cycling at room temperature and its relation to CO oxidation to CO2 at room temperature. M. Newton, D. Ferri, S. Checcia, M. Di Michiel, V. Lütz-Bueno, P. Abdala, M. Nachtegaal

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Application of Electron Microscopy to Catalysis Studies Visualization of Catalyst Structure with Electron Microscopy H. Liu, Organizer J. R. Jinschek, F. Tao, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 69. In situ transmission electron microscopy studies of nanocatalysts at atomic resolution. X. Pan, S. Dai, W. Gao, X. Yan, G.W. Graham 1:40 CATL 70. Aqueously synthesized concave Rh nanotetrahedra with defective surfaces for defect- and plasmon-enhanced catalytic energy conversion. C. Kuo, C. Kao, C. Kuo 2:00 CATL 71. Probing synthesis mechanisms of core-shell metal nanoparticle catalysts at the atomic scale using In Situ STEM. M. Chi, W. Gao, X. Pan, K. More, Y. Xia 2:40 CATL 72. Synergistic effect in colloidal Pd/Au single atom alloy nanocrystals for selective oxidations. C. Wrasman, A.R. Riscoe, A.S. Hoffman, A. Boubnov, S. Bare, M. Cargnello 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 CATL 73. Ultrafast imaging of phase reaction dynamics in Au-GaAs nanowires using 4D electron microscopy. B. Chen, Z. Cao, J. He, Z. Liu 3:40 CATL 74. In-situ TEM studies of nanocatalysts under gas environment. Y. Wang 4:20 CATL 75. Phase-pure intermetallic nanocrystals and enhanced hydrogenation chemoselectivity with intermetallic PtCu nanocatalysts. H. Yin, S. Zhou, H. Yu 4:40 CATL 76. Control of catalysis by elemental substitution in Heusler alloys: Demonstration on selective hydrogenation of alkyne. T. Kojima, S. Kameoka, S. Fujii, S. Ueda, A. Tsai

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

Catalysis for Transformation of Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen to Chemical & Fuel Feedstock J. Huang, Organizer, Presiding Z. Wang, Presiding 1:00 CATL 77. New bimetallic Fe-based catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation to C2-C4= olefins and C5+ higher hydrocarbons. C. Song

1:40 CATL 78. Synergistic effect of dual cations co-anchored on ceria for reforming of methane with carbon dioxide. F. Tao, Y. Tang 2:00 CATL 79. CO2 coversion to MeOH with membrane reactor using zeolite membrane. M. Matsukata, D. Yoshida, M. Sakai, M. Seshimo 2:20 CATL 80. Silica-based magnetically retrievable nanocatalysts for various chemical transformations. R. Gaur 2:40 CATL 81. Template-free synthesis of metal-doped ordered mesoporous polymer for carbon dioxide capture and conversion. M. Nabavinia, I. Noshadi, M. Knighton, M. Briguglio 3:00 Intermission. 3:20 CATL 82. Exploiting high-pressure advantages in hydrogenation of carbon dioxide to methanol. A. Urakawa 3:40 CATL 83. La-Fe-Ni-O CO2 hydrogenation catalysts exploiting the reversible segregation of Ni. P. Steiger, D. Ferri 4:00 CATL 84. Imidazole functionalized MIL-101(Cr), via metal coordination, as a highly active catalyst for carbon dioxide utilization. W.R. Webb, M. Potter, D. Stewart, S. Elliott, P. Sazio, L. Zhang, H. Luo, Z. Zhang, J. Teng, C. Ivaldi, I. Miletto, E. Gianotti, R. Raja 4:20 CATL 85. Mechanistic insights into dopant-enhanced carbon dioxide hydrogenation into hydrocarbons over indium oxide/zeolite multifunctional catalysts. S. Li 4:40 CATL 86. Computer-aided bimetallic nanoparticle design for carbon dioxide adsorption and activation. J. Dean, Y. Yang, N. Austin, G. Veser, G. Mpourmpakis

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level F. Tao, C. Tsung, Organizers W. Huang, Organizer, Presiding F. Shieh, Presiding 1:00 CATL 87. AIM-ing for catalyst synthesis with single-atom precision. Z. Li, A. Peters, K. Otake, J. Liu, K.W. Chapman, H. Noh, T. Islamoglu, O.K. Farha, J.T. Hupp 1:30 CATL 88. Carbon dioxide utilization within tetraazamacrocyclic metal organic frameworks. J. Zhu, P. Usov, A.J. Morris 2:00 CATL 89. Controlling the structures of small molecules at the interface between a nanoparticle surface and a metal–organic framework. C. Tsung 2:30 CATL 90. Evaluating substrate diffusion during interstitial MOF catalysis. D.C. Powers 2:55 Intermission. 3:05 CATL 91. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a general platform for bridging hom*ogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. S.T. Nguyen 3:35 CATL 92. Task-specific design and functionalization of porous organic polymers for heterogeneous catalysis. S. Ma 4:05 CATL 93. Insights into MOF biochemistry: A study on the biological functionality of embedding the enzyme into metal-organic frameworks via de novo approach. F. Shieh 4:35 CATL 94. Insights into the binding and degradation of organophosphates on MOFs from a complementary experimental-modeling study. J. Harvey, D.F. Sava Gallis, C. Pearce, J. DeCoste, M. Kinnan, J.A. Greathouse 4:55 CATL 95. A metal–organic framework with exceptional activity for C-H bond amination. X. Yu, S. Cohen

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Role of Water & Solvent in Heterogeneous Catalysis Transport & Reactions in Liquid-Solid & Gas-LiquidSolid Systems K. A. Stoerzinger, Organizer L. Arnadottir, Z. Feng, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 96. Tailoring electro-oxidation kinetics by controlling the shape and composition of nano-scale electrocatalysts. J. Park, M. Navaei, Z. Feng, S.W. Lee 8:30 CATL 97. Highly disordered carbon for electrochemical ammonia synthesis using N2 and H2O in alkaline electrolytes. G. Wu 9:00 CATL 98. Probing the surface of platinum during the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte. K.A. Stoerzinger, M. Favaro, P. Ross, J. Yano, Z. Liu, Z. Hussain, E. Crumlin 9:20 CATL 99. Non-covalent interactions in the solvation shell of one-electron electron transfer reactions. B. Huang, S. Muy, S. Feng, Y. Katayama, Y. Lu, G. Chen, Y. Shao-Horn

107

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

8:30 CATL 39. Metal–organic frameworks as highly functional catalytic arrays. O.K. Farha 9:00 CATL 40. Immobilizing ultrafine metal clusters to porous materials for enhanced catalytic performance. Q. Xu 9:30 CATL 41. Steering oxygen reduction pathways by docking cobalt-porphyrin nanogrids on graphene. X. Huang, Y. Zhang 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 CATL 42. Precise pore engineering of stable metal− organic frameworks for heterogeneous catalysis. H. Zhou, S. Yuan, X. Yang 10:35 CATL 43. In quest of atomically precise catalysts for oxidative C-H bond activation supported in metal-organic frameworks. C.J. Cramer 11:05 CATL 44. Nanoscale metal-organic frameworks: Emerging materials for catalysis. Z. Tang 11:35 CATL 45. Conductive metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for electrocatalytic applications. S. Marinescu

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CATL 9:40 Intermission. 10:00 CATL 100. Hydrogenation of organic compounds on platinum group metals in aqueous media. N. Singh, C.T. Campbell, J.A. Lercher, J. Fulton, O.Y. Gutiérrez 10:30 CATL 101. In situ spectroscopic study of the structure of the electrical double layer in aqueous solutions near gold and platinum electrodes. M. Salmeron 11:00 CATL 102. Towards understanding the convoluted effects of confinement and solvent for alcohol dehydration on zeolites. F. Chen, M. Wang, H. Shi, Y. Liu, O.Y. Gutiérrez, D.M. Camaioni, J. Lercher 11:20 CATL 103. Solvent effects on elementary reactions in solid-acid catalyzed reactions: Acid-base interactions in zeolites. Y. Mu, W. Elliott, L. Wang, R.M. Rioux 11:40 CATL 104. On the stability of supported carbides (Mo,W) for deoxygenation reactions. H. Bitter, T. Haasterecht, Van, T. Wiegersma, D. Stellwagen, R. Gosselink

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

2018 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science: Symposium in honor of Nicholas Turner W. Kroutil, Organizer, Presiding 8:25 Introductory Remarks. 8:30 CATL 105. Biocatalytic synthesis of amides using amide bond synthetases of the McbA family. G. Grogan 9:00 CATL 106. Development of a chemoenzymatic process for a gamma secretase modulator. J.W. Wong 9:30 CATL 107. Biocatalytic cascade catalysis for pharmaceuticals. M. Truppo 10:00 CATL 108. Biocatalysis in drug discovery and drug development- Reimaging the manufacture of medicine at Novartis. R. Snajdrova 10:30 Intermission. 10:40 CATL 109. Oxygen supply for enzyme-mediated biooxidations. J. Woodley 11:10 CATL 110. Recent advances in photoenzyme catalysis. T. Hyster 11:40 CATL 111. Exploring the synergy between biological catalysis and chemical catalysis. H. Zhao

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Catalytic Insights from In-Situ/Operando X-ray & Neutron Techniques Neutron Catalysis M. Tada, F. Tao, Organizers Z. Wu, Organizer, Presiding K. Page, A. Ramirez-Cuesta, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 112. The application of neutron scattering techniques to investigate reactions relevant to gasolineto-olefin formation over zeolite catalysts. D. Lennon, A. Hawkins, A. Zachariou, A. O’Malley, P. Collier, I. Silverwood, R. Howe, S.F. Parker 8:40 CATL 113. Probing solid-gas interfaces in situ with isotope contrasted neutron total scattering. K. Page 9:15 CATL 114. Insight into molecular behaviour in microporous catalysis using quasielastic neutron scattering. A. O’Malley, S.F. Parker, C. Catlow, I. Silverwood, R. Howe, S. Matam, S. Chapman, R. Raja, M. Sarwar, I. Hitchco*ck, A. York 9:40 Intermission. 9:50 CATL 115. Studying reaction on surfaces with inelastic neutron scattering. A. Ramirez-Cuesta, L. Daemen, Y. Cheng 10:25 CATL 116. Platinum-cerium oxide catalysts studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Y. Mueanngern, X. Yang, Y. Tang, F. Tao, L. Baker 10:45 CATL 117. Application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst as a function of time on stream. A.L. Davidson, D.A. Maclaren, P.B. Webb, R.P. Tooze, S.F. Parker, D. Lennon 11:10 CATL 118. Probing the dynamics and structure of confined benzene in MCM-41 based catalysts. D. Dervin, C. Hardacre, R. Catlow 11:35 CATL 119. What effect does confinement have on the structure of liquid benzene? M. Falkowska, D. Bowron, H. Manyar, T.G. Youngs, C. Hardacre

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

108

Application of Ambient Pressure XPS to Catalysis Studies Catalyst Surface Tracked with AP-XPS H. Liu, Organizer L. Baker, F. Tao, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introduction Remarks. 8:05 CATL 120. Copper-cobalt surface alloys in equilibrium with carbon monoxide gas. M. Salmeron 8:45 CATL 121. Present and new frontiers in APXPS catalysis research: Examples from MAX IV. J. Schnadt, J. Knudsen, A. Shavorskiy, S. Zhu 9:25 CATL 122. From classical model catalysts to liquid metal alloys. C. Papp, H. Steinrueck 10:05 CATL 123. Instrumentation for studying surface of a catalyst at high temperature in near ambient pressure with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. D. Wang, L. Nguyen, Y. Tang, F. Tao 10:30 Intermission. 10:40 CATL 124. A key factor for activity of catalytic reaction observed via operando measurements with near ambient pressure XPS. H. Kondoh 11:20 CATL 125. In situ surface characterization of Pt-Cu single atom alloy model system in ambient pressure of gases. I. Waluyo

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Catalysis for Transformation of Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen to Chemical & Fuel Feedstock J. Huang, Organizer, Presiding D. Ferri, Presiding 8:00 CATL 126. Carbon dioxide to formic acid and to methanol: hom*ogeneous catalytic ways in aqueous solution at room temperatures. G. Laurenczy 8:40 CATL 127. Heterogeneous molecular catalysts for green chemical synthesis and carbon dioxide reduction. Y. Jiang 9:00 CATL 128. Fe-based magnetic ionic liquids: Synthesis, characterization, and application for carbon dioxide fixation. M. Leu, I. Cano, A. Gual, I. Vicente, J. Alves Fernandes, V. Sans Sangorrin, J. Dupont, P. Licence 9:20 CATL 129. Bio-inspired complexes for efficient catalytic interconversion between CO2/H2 and formic acid. W. Wang, Y. Himeda, M. Bao 9:40 CATL 130. CO2 hydrogenation for hydrogen storage using iridium catalysts with deprotonated picolinamide ligands. Y. Himeda, R. Kanega, N. Onishi, L. Wang, M. Ertem, J.T. Muckerman, E. Fujita 10:00 Intermission. 10:20 CATL 131. Investigations into carboxylations through a Ni(I)-intermediate. S. Laursen 10:40 CATL 132. Design of nano-gold catalysts for carbon dioxide hydrogenation to formic acid. X. Wang, Q. Liu, X. Yang, Y. Huang 11:00 CATL 133. Carbon dioxide reforming of methane over Ni-based catalysts: Effects of support properties and metal loading. Z. Wang 11:20 CATL 134. Deactivation study on Ni based pyrochlores in dry reforming of methane. S. Bhattar, A. Krishnakumar, S. Kanitkar, A. Abedin, D. Shekhawat, D. Haynes, J.J. Spivey 11:40 CATL 135. Formic acid from CO2 or carbonate via transfer hydrogenation from glycerol: Mechanistic implications for catalyst design. A. Voutchkova

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Brewster

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level F. Tao, Organizer W. Huang, C. Tsung, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 136. New catalytic materials through atomic layer-by-layer deposition. Y. Xia 8:30 CATL 137. Manipulating Au/TiO2 interface for electrondriven heterogeneous catalysis. W. Wei 9:00 CATL 138. Computational study of metal/nitrogen co-doped carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction. G. Wang 9:30 CATL 139. Coupling solar energy into catalytic organic synthesis. Y. Xiong 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 CATL 140. Nanoscale engineering of efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalysts by tailoring the local chemical environment of Pt surface sites. S. Linic

10:45 CATL 141. Architectural design of bimetallic Au-Pd nanocrystals toward utilization of visible light energy for sensing and catalysis. C. Kuo, Y. Chuang, D. Cullen, J. Huang 11:10 CATL 142. Ordered bimetallic nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis. C.R. Bowers, W. Huang 11:40 CATL 143. Understanding the active sites and reaction mechanism for oxygen electrocatalysis on ruthenium dioxide surfaces. R.R. Rao, Y. Shao-Horn

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers K. Lin, J. A. Lopez-Ruiz, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CATL 144. Amphiphilic dipyridinium-phosphotungstate complex as an active, selective and recyclable catalyst for the epoxidation of oils and fatty acids with hydrogen peroxide. L. de la Garza Becerra, A.H. Moores 1:25 CATL 145. Shaping of catalysts: Additive manufacturing for heterogeneous catalysis. T. Ludwig, B. Rieger, C. Troll, R. Fischer, M. Tonigold 1:45 CATL 146. Green synthesis of N-doped multilayer graphene/silver nano-particle composite using tea leave extract and its application as electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction. C. Senarathna, S.P. Randiligama, R. Rajapakse 2:05 CATL 147. Sintering-resistant anionic single atom catalysts for O2 activation. T. Kropp, M. Mavrikakis 2:25 CATL 148. Gold nanoparticles decorated, “Click” chemistry assisted Fe3O4-CNT nanohybrid heterostructure and appraisal of their catalytic activity. D. Samanta, S. Konar, A. Pathak 2:45 CATL 149. Pd nanoparticles and aminopolymers encapsulated in hollow silica spheres as stable heterogeneous catalysts for semihydrogenation of alkynes. Y. Kuwahara, H. Yamash*ta 3:05 CATL 150. Double-shelled nanoreactor as support for confined catalytic reactions. G. Arora 3:25 CATL 151. Ti-catalyzed radical alkylation of secondary and tertiary alkyl chlorides. X. Wu 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 CATL 152. Encapsulated heterogeneous catalysts in monolithic structures for continuous flow catalytic reactions. S. Smith, S. Ghobadi, S.E. Gilliland, C.E. Castano, F. Gupton 4:15 CATL 153. Construction of an operando dual-beam fourier transform infrared spectrometer and its application in heterogeneous catalysis characterization. J. Liu, W. Zhou, Q. Xin, H. Guo 4:35 CATL 154. Automatic microkinetic mechanism generation for heterogeneous catalysis. R.H. West, E. Mazeau, F. Goldsmith 4:55 CATL 155. Sandwich-structured Pt@ZSM-5 nanosheet hybrid composites for catalytic combustion of toluene. G. Liu, Y. Tian, B. Zhang, L. Wang, X. Zhang 5:15 CATL 156. Reactions of formaldehyde in methanol conversion to olefins on H-ZSM-5 catalysts. F.M. Kirchberger, Y. Liu, S. Müller, M. Tonigold, M. Sanchez-Sanchez, J.A. Lercher

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

2018 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science: Symposium in honor of Nicholas Turner W. Kroutil, Organizer G. Grogan, Presiding 1:00 Introduction Remarks. 1:05 CATL 157. Conformational heterogeneity in the evolution of enzyme function. S. Osuna, C. Curado, E. Serrano-Hervás, G. Casadevall, A. Romero-Rivera, M. Garcia-Borràs, F. Feixas 1:35 CATL 158. Interfacing between experimental and computational enzyme engineering. J. Pelletier 2:05 CATL 159. Biocatalytic sp2-sp2/sp3 C-C bond formation and chiral amines. W. Kroutil, E. Eger, J. Farnberger, J. Pletz, A. Zadlo-Dobrowolska, G. Grogan, K.N. Houk, A. Simon 2:35 Intermission. 2:50 CATL 160. Development of a protease-stable Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase as orally-administered enzyme therapy for potential treatment for PKU. G.W. Huisman, W. Hallows, C. Chng, N. Dellas

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Heterogeneous Catalyst Development for Biomass Upgrading F. G. Baddour, D. A. Ruddy, Organizers S. Habas, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CATL 164. Catalytic deoxygenation on transition metal carbides. A. Bhan 1:25 CATL 165. Late transition metal modified β Mo2C catalysts for enhanced hydrogenation during guaiacol deoxygenation. D. Ruddy, F. Baddour, V. Witte, C. Nash, M. Griffin, J.A. Schaidle 1:45 CATL 166. Developing electrocatalytic processes for the hydrogenation of biomass-derived molecules at normal temperature and pressure. J.A. Lopez-Ruiz, K. Koh, U. Sanyal, J. Egbert, A. Padmaperuma, J. Holladay 2:05 CATL 167. A molecular approach to the design and synthesis of metal carbide catalysts for biomass upgrading. F. Baddour, D. Ruddy, C. Nash, S. Habas, J.A. Schaidle 2:25 CATL 168. High-throughput synthesis of nanostructured catalysts for biomass conversion processes. S. Habas, E.J. Roberts, D. Ruddy, E. White, F. Baddour, M. Griffin, J.A. Schaidle, N. Malmstadt, R.L. Brutchey 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 CATL 169. Enhanced ethanol conversion to ethylene on supported single site Co catalysts. P.D. Srinivasan, J.J. Bravo-Suarez 3:25 CATL 170. Cost insight for catalyst R&D and commercialization decisions with the catalyst cost estimation tool. K.M. Van Allsburg, J.D. Super, J.F. White, J.G. Frye, L. Snowden-Swan, J.A. Schaidle, F.G. Baddour 3:45 CATL 171. Catalytic site elucidation on Cu,Znpromoted MgO/SiO2 catalyst using in situ/operando measurements and DFT calculations. W. Taifan, J. Baltrusaitis 4:05 CATL 172. Aldol condensation on oxide catalysts: Mechanisms and effects of thermal treatments and metal identity. D. Flaherty, H. Zhang, D. Bregante 4:25 CATL 173. Unique active sites at the metal/support interface for the production of high value products from furanics. A. Gomez, L. Herrera, L. Barrett, S. Crossley

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

Application of Ambient Pressure XPS to Catalysis Studies Catalyst Surface Tracked with AP-XPS H. Liu, Organizer L. Baker, F. Tao, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 174. Near ambient pressure photoemissionbased surface techniques for surface catalysis. Q. Fu 1:40 CATL 175. Interactions of gaseous molecules with X-ray photons and photoelectrons in AP-XPS study of solid surface in gas phase. F. Tao 2:05 CATL 176. Ambient pressure XPS for catalysis studies of binary alloys. M. van Spronsen, C. O’Conner, T. Egle, C.M. Friend, R.J. Madix 2:45 Intermission. 2:55 CATL 177. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for electrode/electrolyte interfaces. T. Masuda 3:35 CATL 178. Ambient XPS studies of surface intermediates in alcohol conversions over perovskites. Y. Zhang, A. Savara, D.R. Mullins 3:55 CATL 179. Intermetallic nanoparticles with atomic precision for selective hydrogenation of nitroarenes. W. Huang, Y. Pei 4:35 CATL 180. Palladium oxidation and catalytic activity towards CH4, C2H4, CH3OH. D. Zemlyanov, B. Klötzer 4:55 CATL 181. Understanding adsorption processes on iron oxide surfaces for ammonia formation using ambient pressure-XPS. K.A. Perrine, M. Trought, S. Nemsak, E. Crumlin

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Catalysis for Transformation of Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen to Chemical & Fuel Feedstock J. Huang, Organizer, Presiding A. Urakawa, Presiding 1:00 CATL 182. Ammonia synthesis catalyst: Today and tomorrow. H. Liu 1:30 CATL 183. Physical catalysis for the conversion of dissolved nitrogen gas to ammonia at room temperature. A. Rondinone 1:50 CATL 184. Developing metal catalysts for efficient electroreduction of nitrogen to ammonia. X. Feng 2:10 CATL 185. Electrochemical reduction of N2 to ammonia under ambient conditions on N-doped porous carbon. X. Quan, Y. Liu 2:30 CATL 186. Photocatalytic N2 fixation: A new route for NH3 fuel. W. Wang, X. Sun, X. Li, S. Sun 2:50 Intermission. 3:10 CATL 187. Computational design of high-performance single-atom electrocatalysts for nitrogen fixation. Z. Chen 3:30 CATL 188. Semiconductor photocatalyst for solar fuels production. S. Sun 3:50 CATL 189. Investigation of intramolecular electron transfer of Ru(II)-Ru(II) and Ru(II)-Re(I) supramolecular photocatalysts for CO2 reduction. R. Sampaio, D.C. Grills, K. Koike, Y. Tamaki, O. Ish*tani, E. Fujita 4:10 CATL 190. Suppression of deactivation processes in hom*ogeneous photocatalytic reduction of CO2. M. Pschenitza, S. Meister, B. Rieger 4:30 CATL 191. Biogas dry reforming using solid waste derived catalyst: a green pathway from waste to hydrogen energy. Y. Gao, J. Jiang, Y. Meng, Y. Xu, M. Yang 4:50 CATL 192. Highly-selective hydrogenation of CO2 to 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. S. Ni, J. Zhu, C. Li, R. Lennox

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Brewster

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level W. Huang, F. Tao, Organizers C. Tsung, Organizer, Presiding M. Waegele, Presiding 1:00 CATL 193. Nanoparticle catalysis controlled at atomic level. S. Sun 1:30 CATL 194. Atom-level control of active structures of rare earth/noble metal nanocatalysts for enhanced catalytic properties. Y. Zhang 2:00 CATL 195. Atomic-level control: From single atom to one-atom-thin interface. D. Jiang 2:30 CATL 196. Appearance of an electrochemically inert CO sub-population on Cu electrodes under CO reduction conditions in alkaline pH. M. Waegele, C. Gunathunge, V. Ovalle, Y. Li, M.J. Janik 2:55 Intermission. 3:05 CATL 197. Fundamental aspects of electrocatalysis by transition metal-nitrogen coordinated structures. S. Mukerjee 3:35 CATL 198. Immobilizing molecular catalysts for solar water oxidation. D. Wang, Y. Zhao, W. Li, D. He 4:05 CATL 199. Catalyst materials development for electrochemical CO2 splitting devices. H. Wang 4:30 CATL 200. Electrode-electrolyte interfaces in energy conversion and storage. M. Toney

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Thermochemical & Biochemical Processes Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix K. K. Ramasamy, F. Tao, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 302, 312, 314, 316, 318, 320-321, 324, 329, 333, 335, 338, 341, 343, 346, 350, 352, 353. See subsequent listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers K. Lin, J. A. Lopez-Ruiz, Presiding 8:00 CATL 201. 3D graphene aerogel supported MoS2 and WS2 heterostructures as high performance electrocatalysts. S. Lonkar, V.V. Pillai, S. Al Hassan 8:20 CATL 202. A hybrid organic linker forms an efficient non-supported non-precious-metal-based metal–organic coordination network porous material for oxygen reduction reaction. K. Ping, R. Bhadoria, N. Kongi, P. Starkov, K. Tammeveski 8:40 CATL 203. Super small polymeric carbon nitride nanosphere for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. H. Wang, S. Zhang, M. Li, X. Zhu, X. Liu, Q. Ge 9:00 CATL 204. Hypervalent iodine (III) supporting UiO-67 and DUT-5 as catalysts for the oxidation of aromatic diols. B. Tahmouresilerd, L. Agogo, A.F. Cozzolino 9:20 CATL 205. Synthesis and characterization of templatefree ordered mesoporous catalyst. M. Nabavinia, I. Noshadi, A. Hesketh, P. Philip Wall, M. Knighton, E. Kuhlman, S. Rittweger, J. Ryan 9:40 CATL 206. Characterization of organometallic complexes supported by β-diketonate ligands. E.J. Hopkins, S.J. Scappaticci, A.S. Crossman, M.P. Marshak 10:00 CATL 207. Transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds with isopropanol under base-free conditions catalyzed by a metal−ligand bifunctional iridium catalyst. F. Li 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 CATL 208. Hexamethyl-1, 1’-spirobiindane-based bisoxazoline (HMSI-BOX) ligands for Fe-catalyzed asymmetric reactions. H. Gu, L. Xu-Feng 10:50 CATL 209. Magnesium salts and imidazole: Cost-effective and sustainable catalysts for the efficient synthesis of primary amides from unactivated carboxylic acids. P. Marce-Villa, A. Chhatwal, H. Lomax, A. Blacker, J. Williams 11:10 CATL 210. Abnormal N-heterocyclic carbenes as ligands in catalytic transfer hydrogenation and as central modules in heterobimetallic complexes. L. Pardatscher, M.J. Bitzer, R. Reich, W. Baratta, F.E. Kuehn 11:30 CATL 211. Functionalizing olefins via a new radical catalytic mechanism of nitroxides. J.C. Siu 11:50 CATL 212. Stable CAAC-based complexes in dynamic olefin metathesis. O. Kravchenko, B. Timmer, M. Biedermann, K. Inge, O. Ramstrom

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon F

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach Electrochemical Interfaces & Catalysis D. Jiang, Organizer, Presiding F. Jiao, Presiding 8:00 CATL 213. Catalytic cycle elucidation for oxygen reduction on graphite-conjugated catalysts. N. Ricke, T. Marshall-Roth, A.T. Murray, Y. Surendranath, T.A. Van Voorhis 8:20 CATL 214. Electrochemical CO2 conversion to valuable chemicals. F. Jiao, M. Jouny 9:00 CATL 215. New active electrode systems for electrosynthesis. S.R. Waldvogel 9:40 Intermission. 10:10 CATL 216. Strong metal-oxide interactions and materials design for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reactions. H. Wang 10:50 CATL 217. Chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxide surfaces in energy conversion: Mechanisms and improvements. B. Yildiz 11:30 CATL 218. Non-covalent interactions at electrified interfaces in energy conversion and storage reactions. B. Huang, Y. Katayama, R.R. Rao, Y. Shao-Horn

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Heterogeneous Catalyst Development for Biomass Upgrading F. G. Baddour, S. Habas, Organizers D. A. Ruddy, Organizer, Presiding

109

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

3:20 CATL 161. Biocatalysis: Harnessing the power of nature’s catalysts to build complex molecules. A.R. Narayan 3:50 CATL 162. Directed evolution of artificial metalloenzymes. J.C. Lewis 4:20 Presentation of ACS Catalysis Lectureship Award. 4:25 CATL 163. Design and evolution of new biocatalysts for organic synthesis. N. Turner 5:05 Concluding remarks.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CATL 8:00 CATL 219. Selectivity dependence in catalytic hydrogenolysis of lignin and lignin model compounds on the choice of metal and support. S.L. Scott 8:20 CATL 220. In-situ NMR of the catalytic depolymerization of lignin model polymers. Y. Gao, M.B. Foston, H. Duan 8:40 CATL 221. Lignin valorization by pyrolysis and catalytic oxidation over supported vanadia catalysts. M. Yung, C. Mukarakate, M.R. Nimlos 9:00 CATL 222. Direct biomass conversion into fuels and chemicals over multifunctional nanozeolite-Y based catalyst. D. Verma, R. Insyani, J. Kim 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 CATL 223. Low temperature C-H bond breaking on an inexpensive metal oxide: Methanol to formaldehyde on cerium oxide. J.E. Sutton, T. Danielson, A. Beste, A. Savara 10:00 CATL 224. Highly selective production of acrylic acid from glycerol via two-step pathway using Au/CeO2 catalysts. M. Kim, H. Lee 10:20 CATL 225. Controlling catalytic activity and selectivity of bioprivileged 2-pyrone platform intermediates to functionalized aromatics: The influence of acid sites and solvents. M. Neurock, A. Chemburkar, T. Pfennig, B.H. Shanks 10:40 CATL 226. Acid catalyzed production of 1,3-butadiene from biomass derived tetrahydrofuran. O. Abdelrahman, P.J. Dauenhauer

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Catalytic Activation & Chemical Transformation of Light Alkanes K. K. Ramasamy, F. Tao, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 227. Selective oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride over multi-walled carbon nanotube doped VPO catalyst. X. Chen, B. Wen, R. Liu, S. Zhang 8:30 CATL 228. Hydrocarbon upgrading on sulfur containing catalysts. L. Sharma, R. Upadhyay, A. Wang, G. Yan, M. Ford, I.E. Wachs, Z. Wu, S. Rangarajan, J. Baltrusaitis 9:05 CATL 229. Reactivity of PdZn surfaces: From simplicity of atomically flat surfaces to complexity of technical catalysts. C. Milligan, J.T. Miller, F. Ribeiro, D. Zemlyanov 9:35 CATL 230. Dry reforming of methane over CeO2supported Pt-Co catalysts with enhanced activity. Z. Xie, B. Yan, S. Kattel, J. Lee, S. Yao, Q. Wu, J.G. Chen 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 CATL 231. Role of confinement in selective C-H bond activations in MoV oxides. Y. Liu, A. Leelavathi, S. Ezenwa, P. Deshlahra 10:25 CATL 232. Brønsted and Ga Lewis acid synergy in ZSM-5 for alkane dehydrogenation. M. Schreiber, C. Plaisance, R. Bermejo de Val, J. Lercher 11:15 CATL 233. PtCu single atom alloys for selective CH activation. P. Kress 11:45 CATL 234. Effect of the surface termination of perovskite catalysts on acid-base catalysis and methane activation. F. Polo-Garzon, V. Fung, X. Liu, S. Yang, G. Foo, E. Bickel, L. Bai, M. Chisholm, M. Chi, D. Jiang, Z. Wu

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

New Vistas in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Symposium in honor of Robert Grasselli D. Buttrey, W. A. Goddard, A. F. Volpe, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 235. Remembering Robert K. Grasselli: Reflections on three decades of collaboration on complex oxides for selective oxidation. D.J. Buttrey 8:40 CATL 236. Quantum mechanics based mechanisms for selective activation of hydrocarbons by mixed metal oxide heterogeneous catalysts – A tribute to Robert Grasselli. W.A. Goddard 9:15 CATL 237. Irsee symposium revisited – My memories of Professor Robert Grasselli. M. Bhasin 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 CATL 238. Support effect in oxide catalysis: C-H bond activation on vanadia/ceria compared to vanadia/ silica. J. Sauer 10:45 CATL 239. Low temperature selective oxidation of ethylbenzene by catalyzed co-oxidation using Co-ZSM-5 and solubilized Au clusters catalysts. A. Peng, M. Ross, L. Qian, M. Kung, B.M. Hoffman, H. Kung

110

11:20 CATL 240. Modern insights into bulk mixed metal oxide catalysts. I.E. Wachs

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level F. Tao, C. Tsung, Organizers W. Huang, Organizer, Presiding L. Baker, Presiding 8:00 CATL 241. Alloy catalysis spanning composition space: Hydrogenation on CuxAuyPd1-x-y. A.J. Gellman, I. Sen, P. Kondratyuk 8:30 CATL 242. Tailoring the activity of Pt/CeO2 catalysts via high temperature synthesis. X. Pereira-Hernandez, A. DeLaRiva, D. Kunwar, H. Xiong, B. Sudduth, M. Engelhard, L. Kovarik, Y. Wang, A.K. Datye 9:00 CATL 243. Parahydrogen spin labelling studies of hydrogenation catalysis over silica-encapsulated Pt-Sn intermetallic nanoparticles. E. Zhao, H. Hagelin-Weaver, W. Huang, C.R. Bowers 9:30 CATL 244. Effects of co-processing organic chlorides on rates and selectivity of ethylene epoxidation on promoted Ag/Al2O3 catalysts. J.W. Harris, C. Chen, A. Bhan 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 CATL 245. The challenge of creating well-defined cation sites in zeolite: A study of propane dehydrogenation on Ga/H-MFI. A.T. Bell 10:40 CATL 246. Single rhodium atoms anchored in micropores for efficient transformation of methane to acetic acid and methanol under mild conditions. F. Tao 11:10 CATL 247. Catalysis at multiple length scales: Bifunctional activation at nanoscale and mesoscale interfaces in platinum–cerium oxide catalysts. L. Baker, Y. Mueanngern 11:35 CATL 248. Nano-catalysts for the synthesis/ dehydrogenation of formic acid as a renewable hydrogen carrier. K. Mori, S. Masuda, H. Yamash*ta

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Hydrogen, Biofuels & Biomass Upgrading Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers K. Lin, J. A. Lopez-Ruiz, Presiding 1:00 CATL 249. Microwave catalytic conversion of ethane to higher value chemicals. X. Bai, B. Robinson, S. Tiwari, J. Hu 1:20 CATL 250. Insights into the structure-performance of Fe-based Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis catalysts: From the surface to the bulk. J. Wang, S. Huang, X. Ma 1:40 CATL 251. Synthesis of doped layered double hydroxides in a meso-scale continuous flow reactor. P. Yaseneva, N. An, M. Finn, N. Tidemann, N. Jose, A. Voutchkova, A. Lapkin 2:00 CATL 252. Reactivity of inverse catalysts prepared by size-selected deposition of metal oxide clusters. K. Goodman, M. Xue, J. Wang, M.G. White 2:20 CATL 253. Development of a new generation of stable, tunable, and catalytically active nanoparticles produced by the helium nanodroplet deposition and doping segregation methods. A. Orlov, Q. Wu, J.G. Chen, E. Stach, M. Lindsay, C. Ridge, A. Frenkel 2:40 CATL 254. Optimized phase heterojunctions in enhancing the photoelectrochemical activity of TiO2 photoanodes: A surface energy insight. A.R. Ballestas Barrientos, T. Maschmeyer, A. Masters 3:00 CATL 255. Study of parameters affecting carburization extent of active metallic species for the non-oxidative valorization of natural gas. S. Balyan, S. Mishra, M. Haider, K.K. Pant 3:20 CATL 256. Highly active and stable carbon nanosheets supported iron oxide nanocatalysts for Fischer-Tropsch to olefins synthesis. Y. Zhou, S. Natesakhawat, T. Nguyen Phan, C. Marin, D. Kauffman, J. Lekse, C. Matranga, H. Xin, E. Stavitski, K. Attenkofer, I. Waluyo, Y. Tang, Y. Guo, A. Roy, C. Wang 3:40 Intermission.

3:50 CATL 257. Improving methanol-to-olefins turnover capacity of CHA materials by controlling methanol transfer dehydrogenation rates. P. Bollini, A. Bhan 4:10 CATL 258. Taming hydrogen cyanide and methyl mercaptan for hom*ogeneous catalysis. S. Kristensen, T. Skrydstrup 4:30 CATL 259. Insights into the effect of metal mole ratio in PtNiCu catalysts for the study of the ethanol oxidation reaction. S. Jilani, E. Iyanobor, D. Zager, Y. Tong 4:50 CATL 260. Elucidation of methanol poisoning mechanism of sulfonic acid catalysts. M. Salazar, C. Chi, S. Fetsko 5:10 CATL 261. Determining molecular mechanisms for gas adsorption in metal-organic frameworks using X-ray spectroscopy. W. Drisdell, G. Su, L. Wan, D. Prendergast, J. Kortright

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon F

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach Hydrogen Evolution & Related Reactions D. Jiang, Organizer Z. Chen, Y. Sun, Presiding 1:00 CATL 262. High activity hydrogen evolution catalysis by uniquely designed amorphous/metal interface of core– shell phosphosulfide/N-doped CNTs. B. Han 1:20 CATL 263. Interfacing metals and metal nitrides creates superior electrocatalysts for both hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions. Y. Sun 2:00 CATL 264. Theoretical suggestion and experimental proof for functionalization of h-BN by gold as electrocatalysts for ORR and HER. T. Taketsugu, A. Lyalin, M. Gao, K. Uosaki 2:40 Intermission. 3:00 CATL 265. Molecular mimics of MoS2 edges for hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysis. Y. Wu 3:40 CATL 266. Chemistries of layered transition metal compound materials. A. Vojvodic 4:20 CATL 267. Computational quest for high-performance single-atom electrocatalysts. Z. Chen 5:00 CATL 268. Co-activation of CO2 and CH4 on ZnO/ In2O3 for direct C-C formation. Y. Zhao, X. Zhu, H. Wang, J. Han, D. Mei, Q. Ge

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Heterogeneous Catalyst Development for Biomass Upgrading S. Habas, D. A. Ruddy, Organizers F. G. Baddour, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CATL 269. Opportunities and limitations for surface science-informed design of deoxygenation catalysts. J.W. Medlin 1:25 CATL 270. Insights into the electrochemical conversion of biomass derivatives to fuels and chemicals. A. Román, Z. Barton, A. Holewinski 1:45 CATL 271. Increasing conversion selectivity for biomass relevant reactions through molecularly tuning catalyst design. N.A. Brunelli, N. Deshpande, C. Yang, E. Cho, M. Whitaker, L. Pattanaik, L. Lin 2:05 CATL 272. Hydrophobic modification of grafted sulfonic acid/silica catalysts does improve their tolerance to water during esterification. W. Elliott, I. Burgos, J. Sutyak, Y. Mu, R.M. Rioux 2:25 CATL 273. Various nanocatalysts for catalytic furfural hydrogenation. K. An 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 CATL 274. Biphasic catalytic process for production of renewable fuels and chemicals. H. Lin 3:25 CATL 275. Preventing the deactivation of Sncontaining zeolites during continuous biomass processing. C. Hammond 3:45 CATL 276. One-pot direct conversion of cellulosederived compounds into highly selective 2,5-dimethylfuran over multifunctional Cu-Pd/Zr-based metal-organic framework heterogeneous catalyst. R. Insyani, D. Verma, J. Kim 4:05 CATL 277. Mesoporous catalyst for microalgae liquified biocrude upgrading: Kinetics and mechanism study. J. Bian, J. Li, C. Li, L. Feng

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

A. Orlov, Organizer D. Su, S. Zhang, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 278. Subphthalocyanine-based covalent organic frameworks for organic photovoltaics. S.A. Lopez, J.M. Cox 1:20 CATL 279. Photochemical synthesis route to typical transition metal sulfides as highly efficient cocatalyst for hydrogen evolution: From the case of NiS/g-C3N4. H. Zhang, Y. Dong, G. Wang, P. Jiang 1:40 CATL 280. Photocatalysis facilitated by heterojunctions in two dimensional materials. Z. Wu 2:10 CATL 281. The role of grain boundaries and dopants in crystalline BiVO4 thin film solar water splitting photoanodes. M. Liu 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 CATL 282. Photocatalysis on quantum-sized nanoparticles. Y. Sun 3:15 CATL 283. Facet-dependent activity in the photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol using bismuth vanadate. W. Zhu, M. Shen, G. Fan, A. Yang, J. Meyer, Y. Ou, J. Fortner, M.B. Foston, Z. Li, Z. Zou, B. Sadtler 3:40 CATL 284. Construction of TiO2 p-n hom*ojunctions for photocatalytic applications. X. Zhang, S. Guoqiang, Y. Chen, L. Pan, L. Wang, J. Zou 4:00 CATL 285. Passivated porous m-BiVO4/m-Bi4V2O11 nanocomposite for highly efficient water oxidation. H. Ren, T. Dittrich, C. Zhao, C.C. Sorrell 4:20 CATL 286. Visible light photocatalysis mechanism on designed O/Ba co-functionalized amorphous carbon nitride. F. Dong, W. Cui, Y. Sun 4:40 CATL 287. Improvement of visible light response photoatalyst ZnIn2S4 based on bandgap engineering with metal co-doping. I. Tateishi, M. Furukawa, M. Inoue, H. Katsumata, S. Kaneco

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 3

New Vistas in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Symposium in honor of Robert Grasselli D. Buttrey, W. A. Goddard, A. F. Volpe, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 288. Memories of Robert K. Grasselli at SOHIO – A visionary and revered mentor. J. Bartek 1:35 CATL 289. Mechanisms of selective oxidation and ammoxidation catalysis: A tribute to the legacy of R. K. Grasselli. J.D. Burrington 2:10 CATL 290. Thin films as model materials in catalysis: A perspective at the atomic level. H. Freund 2:45 Intermission. 3:05 CATL 291. Metal-decorated metal–organic frameworks active for propane functionalization: A combined computational and experimental study. L. Gagliardi 3:40 CATL 292. Phase transitions on the surface of alkane oxidation catalysts. A. Trunschke 4:15 CATL 293. Energy and economic metrics for evaluating chemical processing technologies associated with oxidative dehydrogenation: Ethylene case study. A. Gaffney 4:50 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level W. Huang, F. Tao, Organizers C. Tsung, Organizer, Presiding N. Fang, Presiding 1:00 CATL 294. Hydrogen production without CO2: Experiments and computations. D. Upham, C. Palmer, J. Zeng, S. Su, V. Agarwal, H.H. Kristoffersen, M.J. Gordon, E.W. McFarland, H. Metiu 1:30 CATL 295. Surface acidity of atomic dispersed aluminum species in silica for sustainable fuels and chemicals production. J. Huang, Z. Wang 2:00 CATL 296. Elucidating the chemical nature of single-site catalysts from first principles. A.J. Hensley, A. Therrien, M. Marcinkowski, R. Zhang, K. Groden, F.R. Lucci, B. Coughlin, A. Schilling, E.H. Sykes, J. McEwen 2:30 CATL 297. Atomically-dispersed Re sites via an anhydrous perrhenate grafting strategy for high activity olefin metathesis catalysts. S.L. Scott 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 CATL 298. Shape matters: Oxide nanocrystals as catalysts and catalyst supports. Z. Wu

3:40 CATL 299. In situ quantitative study of nanoconfinement effects in heterogeneous catalysis at the single-molecule and single-particle level. N. Fang, W. Huang, B. Dong, Y. Pei 4:10 CATL 300. Intermetallics enable rational control of catalytic active site nuclearity and composition. A. Dasgupta, H. He, E. Zimmerer, M. Janik, R.M. Rioux 4:40 CATL 301. Rhodium copper for selective C-H activation at the single-atom limit. R.T. Hannagan, E.H. Sykes

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Biochars & Renewable Carbons Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

Novel Catalytic Materials Frontier Catalysts Progress Sponsored by ENFL, Cosponsored by CATL

TUESDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers 6:00 – 8:00 CATL 302. New phase-separable polyisobutylene palladium catalysts for Buchwald-Hartwig amination reaction. E.P. Sliwinski, J. Balogh, A.R. Hlil, I. El-Zoghbi, M. Ghufran Rafique, D. Chouikhi, M. Al-Hashimi, H.S. Bazzi CATL 303. Facile synthesis of 3D flower-like Ni2P composed by nanoplates towards electrochemical water splitting. H. Zheng, X. Huang, G. Wang CATL 304. Development of a novel Pd based heterogeneous catalyst for catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2. Q. Zhao, C. Zhang CATL 305. Catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 to value-added products over novel Pd-Pt based heterogeneous catalysts. A. Salzano, C. Zhang CATL 306. A novel Fe based heterogeneous catalyst for carbon dioxide catalytic conversion to value-added products. A. Tripoli, C. Zhang CATL 307. A novel Co-Ni based heterogeneous catalyst for catalytic reduction of CO2 by H2 to value-added products. C. Velasquez, C. Zhang CATL 308. Converting carbon dioxide to value-added products over a novel palladium based catalyst supported on iron oxide. T. Reid, C. Zhang CATL 309. Development of a novel Ni-polyoxometalate based heterogeneous catalyst for carbon dioxide conversion to value-added products. M. Mohtarami, C. Zhang CATL 310. Strongly reducing organic photoredox catalysts for small molecule and macromolecular synthesis. B. Buss, G. Miyake CATL 311. Solvent effect in the efficiency of V- and Ceincorporated MCM-41 for liquid phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol. C.M. Aiube, J.L. de Macedo CATL 312. Photodecomposition of liquids in carbon dioxide enriched enviroment by nanostructured colbalt catalyst. E. Farrell, D.K. Ryan, K. Davies CATL 313. Synthesis and research of metal-organic frameworks materials based on the nitrogen and carboxylic acid ligands. D. Sheng CATL 314. Mesoporous manganese oxide catalyzed aerobic oxidation of alkyl arenes to carbonyl compounds. D. Rathnayake, S.L. Suib CATL 315. Double donor Sb5+ doped hematite (Fe3+) photoanodes for surface-enhanced PEC water splitting. A. Annamalai, R. Sandström, E. Gracia Espino, N. Boulanger, J. Boily, I. Muehlbacher, T. Wagberg CATL 316. Efficient catalytic oxidation of aldehydes to carboxilic acids in the presence of Zn doped MCM-41. E. Pimentel Martínez, D. Perez Martinez, L. Lomas Romero, G. Negron Silva, D. Ángeles Beltrán CATL 317. Study of protein and peptide-directed nanoparticle synthesis for catalytic materials. A. Mosleh, R. Beitle, M. Beyzavi CATL 318. Characterization and photophysical properties of porphyrins based metal organic framework (RWLCAA-1) obtained by self-assembly of zinc 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)21H,23H-porphine. A. Alanazi, R.W. Larsen CATL 319. Methane decomposition for the production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes over transition metal aerogel catalysts. B. Bao, I. Wang, T. Haines, L. Ren, H. Tian, J. Hu

CATL 320. Applications of microwave plasma catalysis. A.M. Caiola, S. Tiwari, X. Bai, A.D. Lalsare, J. Hu CATL 321. Stability of Fe and Zn promoted Mo/ZSM-5 catalysts for ethane dehydroaromatization in cyclic operation mode. B. Robinson, X. Bai, V. Abdelsayed, D. Shekhawat, J. Hu CATL 322. Direct conversion of methane to methanol using supported Pt/CeO2 catalysts. H. Park, S. Kye, K. Lee, H. Suh, J. Kim, N.H. Hur CATL 323. Catalyst screening for the depolymerization of alkali lignin in the presence of subcritical water. B. Jadhav, R. Roy, D.E. Raynie CATL 324. co*ke resistance in dry reforming of methane over supported Ni-In catalysts under high-pressure conditions. H. Dang, S. Roshandel, A. Goeppert, N. Entesari, S.G. Prakash CATL 325. Interface engineering for a poison-free CO oxidation by Pt@Cu core@shell nanoparticles. K. Shin, L. Zhang, H. An, H. Ha, G.A. Henkelman, H. Kim CATL 326. In-situ near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the catalytic and gas sensing properties of copper and tin oxides. M. Vorokhta, I. Khalakhan, P. Hozák, M. Novotný, J. Vlcek, P. Fitl, M. Vondráček, J. Lančok, V. Matolin CATL 327. Methane pyrolysis for carbon nanotubes and CO2-free H2 over transition metal catalysts. I. Wang, D. Ayillath Kutteri, B. Bao, E. Chia, H. Tian, J. Hu CATL 328. Metal-organic framework host/guest photocatalysts for CO2 reduction. J. Martin CATL 329. Understanding the dynamics of ceria-based catalysts using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). J. Sung, B. Choi, B. Kim, J. Park CATL 330. Parametric study on production capacity of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) reactor using ASPEN HYSYS as a simulating tool and zeolite as catalyst, a case study of Kaduna Refining and Petrochemical Company (KRPC) FCC reactor. J.O. Olujinmi, G. Olugbenga CATL 331. Two-dimensional ZnxCd1-xS solid solution nanosheets for highly efficient visible-light-driven hydrogen generation. J. Lu, J. Shi CATL 332. Synthesis of cerium doped CuMgAl mixed metal oxides and utilizing their properties for enhanced visible light photocatalysis. K. Goswami, R. Ananthakrishnan CATL 333. Examination of catalytic hydrolysis of a methylparaoxon (MPO) nerve-agent simulant with intrinsically controlled UiO-66 in particle size and defect site density. K. Baek, K. Cho CATL 334. Concave Bi2WO6 nanoplates with oxygen vacancies achieving enhanced electrocatalytic and photocatalytic activitie. M. Dekun CATL 335. Nickel nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation reaction produced under galvanostatic control. M.P. Salinas, M. Videa, D.A. Crespo-Yapur CATL 336. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations of substrate binding in a pH-affected fungal beta-glucosidase. M. Solhtalab, D. Flannelly, L. Aristilde CATL 337. Hydrodeoxygenation pathways on the bimetallic phosphide catalysts. V. Jain, N. Rai CATL 338. Electrochemical difunctionalization of alkenes. N. Fu CATL 339. In situ FTIR determination of surface adsorption species over bimetallic alloy catalysts in catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. R. Robinson, D. Caracciolo, S. Shan, S. Wang, J. Luo, C. Zhong CATL 340. Probing hydrogen nanobubble evolution at single catalytic sites on polycrystalline platinum and gold surfaces. R.T. Perera, C.E. Arcadia, J. Rosenstein CATL 341. Urea H-bond donating catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of lactones: Mechanistic insights via Hammett relationship. R.S. Hewawasam, J.U. Pothupitiya, M.K. Kiesewetter CATL 342. Low temperature electrocatalytic carboxylation of aryl halides via platinum-decorated graphene nanoplatelet electrodes. S. Ghobadi, S. Smith, S.E. Gilliland, C.E. Castano, T. Roper, F. Gupton CATL 343. Microwave-assisted catalytic synthesis of ammonia from CH4 and N2 under ambient pressure. S. Tiwari, X. Bai, J. Hu CATL 344. Configuration dependent adsorbate interactions study using support vector machine model. S. Zhengjiang CATL 345. Low temperature ethylene oxidation over Pt supported hydrophobic mesopores of SBA-15. S.S. Satter, K. Nakajima, A. f*ckuoka CATL 346. Synthesis, characterization of benzyl sulphonic acid functionalized MCM-41 and its catalytic application in preparation of CL-20 via HNO3 electrolyte involved nitration of TAIW. S. Chen, C. Yang, H. Qian, D. Liu

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

Advanced Catalytic Materials with Well-Defined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CATL CATL 347. Intramolecular reactions of alkyne-acids using a gold functionalized cavitand. T.D. Ho, M. Schramm CATL 348. Novel and selective palladium (II) OCO pincer catalysts for the α-arylation of ketones. W. Kai, H. Qian, Z. Ye, D. Liu CATL 349. Steerable transition of Ru(0001)/FeO(111) through reduction by hydrocarbons. W. Rong, K. Wu CATL 350. Facile approach for the oxidation of aniline to nitrosobenzene using mesoporous W/Ti mixed metal oxide. W. Thalgaspitiya, T. Premalal, S.L. Suib CATL 351. A novel biphosphine ligands with Fe-center promoted rhodium –catalyzed hydroformylation of vinyl acetate to give n-product. X. Xu, J. Jiang, D. Liu, H. Feng CATL 352. Reduction of nitric monoxide studied by in situ modulation excitation IR spectroscopy. X. Wang, N. Maeda CATL 353. Selective oxidation of olefins to ketones over palladium supported on reduced graphene oxide. X. Peng, X. Gao CATL 354. Benzyl alcohol selective oxidative dehydrogenation over supported gold nanoparticle catalysts: A density functional theory study. Z. Wang, X. Gong CATL 355. Selective ethylene tetramerization with actived metal−organic framework MIL-100(Fe). Y. Han, Y. Zhang, X. Guang, X. Liu, G. Feng CATL 356. Bimass derived acetic acid hydrodeoxygenation over Pt-based bimetallic catalysts. Y. Zheng, S.G. Podkolzin CATL 357. Perovskite CsPbBr3 nanocrystals as efficient photocatalyst for synthesis of 1,3,5-trisubstituted pyrazoles and 2,5 diaryl-substituted pyrroles via visible light illumination. Y. Lin, Y. Sun, X. Zhu, Y. Yan CATL 358. Identifying the role of photogenerated holes in photocatalytic methanol dissociation on rutile TiO2(110). Z. Jiawei, H. Wang, P. Hu

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

Hybrid Biological & Chemocatalytic Processes for Biomass Upgrading K. K. Ramasamy, D. Vardon, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 CATL 359. Active site requirements for upgrading biologically-derived platform molecules. H. Abdulrazzaq, T.J. Schwartz 8:40 CATL 360. Directed evolution of oxalate decarboxylase for the enhancement of a hybrid enzymatic and organic electrolytic cascade. V. Russell, S. Abdellaoui, S.D. Minteer 9:00 CATL 361. Atomic layer deposition with Al2O3 for enhanced Pd/TiO2 stability during biobased adipic acid production. D. Vardon, A. Settle, N. Cleveland, X. Huo, A. York, A. Devaraj, E. Kautz, K.K. Ramasamy, G. Beckham, M. Griffin, K.E. Hurst, C. Farberow, E. Tan, S. Christensen 9:20 Intermission. 9:40 CATL 362. Mechanistic understanding of C-C bond formation and O removal over Lewis acid-base pairs. H. Li, J. Sun, Y. Wang 10:10 CATL 363. Experimental and computational studies on catalytic upgrading of biochemical intermediates from biomass. J. Alegre-Requena, S. Kim, A. Settle, J. Stunkel, D. Robichaud, D. Vardon, D.K. Johnson, R. Paton 10:30 CATL 364. Mild pretreatment conditions resulting in reduced impurities, lower acidity, and high furan yields from biomass using heterogenous catalysts. J. Romo, T. Wu, J. Lucero, M.A. Carreon, S. Wettstein

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach Electrochemical & Photoelectrochemical Synthesis D. Jiang, Organizer T. Taketsugu, S. R. Waldvogel, Presiding 8:00 CATL 365. Fundamental investigations of electrocatalyzed transformations of organic compounds. S.A. Akhade, M. Lee, N. Singh, U. Sanyal, O.Y. Gutiérrez, J. Lercher, V. Glezakou, R. Rousseau 8:20 CATL 366. Direct oxidative functionalization of alcohols at electrode surfaces. K. Manthiram 9:00 CATL 367. The atomistic description of the electrolyte at the electrode-electrolyte interface (EEI). W.A. Goddard, A. Fortunelli, T. Cheng 9:40 Intermission.

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10:00 CATL 368. High-potential porphyrins supported on semiconductor surfaces for photoelectrochemical applications. C.A. Schmuttenmaer, R.H. Crabtree, G.W. Brudvig, V.S. Batista 10:40 CATL 369. Carbon-based catalytic materials for energy conversion. J. Chen 11:20 CATL 370. Selective reforming of methane to CO by photoelectrochemical reactions on TiO2. D. Wang, W. Li, D. He, M. Waegele, D. Jiang, G.W. Brudvig

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Advanced Catalytic Materials with Well-Defined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability A. Orlov, Organizer D. Su, S. Zhang, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 371. Nanostructured multi-component oxide catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation. S. Dai 8:30 CATL 372. Bimetallic catalyst with a core-shell structure for CO2 reduction. F. Jiao, W. Luc, M. Jouny 9:00 CATL 373. Promoting effects of hydrothermal treatment on catalytic performance of Pd/CeO2 for CO Oxidation. H. Jeong, H. Lee 9:20 CATL 374. Manganese promoter effects in carbonsupported copper-based ester hydrogenation catalysis. R. Beerthuis, N. Visser, J. Deeley, G. Sunley, K. De Jong, P. de Jongh 9:40 CATL 375. Green application of hydrogenation catalyst YN-1 on C4 and C5 cut. Z. Du 10:00 CATL 376. Insights for catalyst cesign: Using welldefined metal oxide nanocrystals to elucidate structureactivity relationships. P.A. Pepin, J.M. Vohs 10:20 Intermission. 10:30 CATL 377. Understanding and tuning catalytic materials using well-defined nanocrystal precursors. M. Cargnello, J. Willis, E.D. Goodman, C. Wrasman, A. Yang, F. Abild-Pedersen, S. Bare 11:00 CATL 378. Preparation of Ni@Silicalite-2 as a high stability catalyst for dry reforming of methane. Y. Lu, Y. Zhao, X. Ma, S. Wang 11:20 CATL 379. Nanotube-assembled hollow sphere nanoreactor for dimethyl oxalate hydrogenation to ethylene glycol: The morphology effect. D. Yao, Y. Wang, Y. Zhao, X. Ma 11:40 CATL 380. Dry reforming of methane over organized mesoporous alumina materials derived from EISA and MOF routes. L. Karam, J. Reboul, S. Casale, N. El Hassan, P. Massiani

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Thompson

Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems Influence of Water on Heterogeneous Catalysts J. Faria, F. Neira Dangelo, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CATL 381. Initial particle size effects on the stability of nickel catalysts in aqueous conditions. H. Bitter, T. van Haasterecht, M. Swart, K. De Jong 8:25 CATL 382. Trends in activity and stability of supported Ru during aqueous-phase hydrogenation of levulinic acid. J. Bond 8:55 CATL 383. Watching solid catalysts at work in the liquid phase. D. Ferri 9:25 CATL 384. Continuous synthesis of DMC from CO2 and methanol over CeO2 using 2-cyanopyridine as dehydrating agent: Catalyst stability and the reaction mechanism. A. Urakawa 9:55 CATL 385. Molecular simulations for calculating the free energies of adsorption and reaction in aqueous phase heterogeneous catalysis. X. Zhang, T. Xie, R.B. Getman 10:25 Intermission. 10:40 CATL 386. Understanding the role of solvent effects in the thermal and electrochemical hydrogenation of organics. S.A. Akhade, M. Lee, M. Nguyen, V. Glezakou, R. Rousseau 11:10 CATL 387. Controlling mass transport at electrocatalytic interfaces: Towards air-based water splitting devices. M.A. Modestino 11:40 CATL 388. Multicatalytic, light-driven polymerization of phenols for flocculation of wastewater impurities. G. Hafenstine, R.E. Patalano, O. Yehezkeli, K. Ma, A.P. Goodwin, J.N. Cha

SECTION F Renaissance Boston Waterfront Mediterranean

Meeting the Challenges of Heterogeneous Catalysis Controlled at Atomic Level F. Tao, Organizer W. Huang, C. Tsung, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introduction Remarks. 8:05 CATL 389. Novel preparation of reverse model catalyst, FeO/Pt(111), for CO oxidation and H2O dissociation. R. Paul, R.G. Reifenberger, T. Fisher, D. Zemlyanov 8:25 CATL 390. Multidimensional scaling of catalyst performance: From UHV to operating conditions. C. Reece, E. Redekop, S.G. Karakalos, R.J. Madix 8:45 CATL 391. Mimicking phosphotriesterase enzyme via engineering defects in metal-organic frameworks. One step closer to achieving more robust and reactive heterogeneous catalysts for detoxification of chemical warfare agents. M. Momeni, C.J. Cramer 9:05 CATL 392. Single-site supported metal complexes: Tunable catalytic performance with ionic liquid coatings. M. Babucci, C. Fang, A.S. Hoffman, S. Bare, B.C. Gates, A. Uzun 9:25 CATL 393. An atomic-scale study of oxygen dissociation on Ag on Cu(111). L. Cramer 9:45 CATL 394. Facile chemical approach to regio control synthesis of gold-BINOL hybrid nanostructures. P.R. Reddy 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 CATL 395. Surface structure and reactivity of Ni-Cu single-atom alloys. D. Patel, E.H. Sykes 10:35 CATL 396. From single atoms to clusters, manipulating CO2 reduction pathways on Rh catalysts. Y. Zhu, O.Y. Gutiérrez, J. Fulton, L. Kovarik, J. Szanyi, J. Lercher 10:55 CATL 397. X-ray emission spectroscopy studies of metal–organic frameworks. J.V. Lockard 11:15 CATL 398. Single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on MnO2 for catalytic decomposition of caproaldehyde at room temperature. H. Zhang, P. Zhang 11:35 CATL 399. Molecular level characterization of 1:1 chiral docking on Cu(111). A. Larson, R. Hannagan, E.H. Sykes

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

Hybrid Biological & Chemocatalytic Processes for Biomass Upgrading K. K. Ramasamy, D. Vardon, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 400. Electrocatalytic energy upgrading of lignin to fuels and chemicals: A path to organic reaction discovery? J.E. Jackson, P. Hao, G. Klinger, Y. Zhou, E.L. Hegg, S. Christopher 1:30 CATL 401. Effects of impurities in two-Step vs. one-step hydroprocessing of algae oils. J. Kruger, E. Christensen, T. Dong, G. Chupka, P.T. Pienkos, R.L. McCormick 1:50 CATL 402. Multi-functional mixed oxide catalysis in cascade chemistry to convert ethanol to C5+ ketones. K.K. Ramasamy, M. Guo, M. Gray, S. Subramaniam 2:10 Intermission. 2:25 CATL 403. Biological valorization of aqueous waste carbon from catalytic fast pyrolysis. G. Beckham, B.A. Black, M. Franden, L.N. Jayakody, C.W. Johnson, A. Meyers 2:55 CATL 404. A kinetic analysis of selective carboxylic hydrodeoxygenation over supported Pt and Ru catalysts. J. Bond, J. Gopeesingh 3:15 CATL 405. Active surface and mechanism for propionic acid reduction over RuSn. V. Vorotnikov, T. Eaton, A. Settle, K. McKinney, E. Wagner, C. Yang, J.T. Miller, G. Beckham, D. Vardon 3:35 CATL 406. The hyper-thermophilic and catalytic mechanism of extremophile cellulase TmCel12A. P. Lian, H. Guo, J. Smith 3:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

D. Jiang, Organizer C. T. Campbell, F. Zaera, Presiding 1:00 CATL 407. Designing heterogeneous alloy catalysts from first principles and surface science. E.H. Sykes, M. Stamatakis, M. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, A. Michaelides, T. Thuening 1:40 CATL 408. Au-TiO2 interfaces in the catalysis of low-temperature oxidation and H2 photoproduction from water. F. Zaera 2:20 CATL 409. Eleectride-based catalysts for ammonia synthesis at mild conditions. H. Hosono 2:40 Intermission. 2:50 CATL 410. Mechanistic understanding of methanol carbonylation: Interfacing hom*ogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis via carbon supported Ir-La. A.J. Hensley, J. Zhang, I. Vincon, X. Pereira-Hernandez, D. Tranca, G. Seifert, J. McEwen, Y. Wang 3:30 CATL 411. Where computational catalysis meets experiment. C.T. Campbell, Z. Mao 4:10 CATL 412. Strong metal-support interaction (SMSI): An extension from oxide support to carbide and nitride. J. Dong, Q. Fu, X. Bao 4:50 CATL 413. Elucidating active VOx/TiO2 surfaces for lignin oxidation using model compounds. V. Vorotnikov, A. Robinson, G. Beckham

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

Operando Spectroscopy for Catalysis J. J. Bravo-Suarez, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 CATL 414. Operando vibrational spectroscopy during selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 by VOx/TiO2 catalysts. I.E. Wachs, M. Zhu, J. Lai, Z. Wu 1:30 CATL 415. Operando spectroscopy: Transients, cells, hyphenation. D. Ferri 1:55 CATL 416. Space- and time-resolved operando spectroscopic studies of heterogeneous catalysts under unsteady-state operations. A. Urakawa 2:20 CATL 417. Developing a Raman-spectrokinetic approach to gain insights into the structure-reactivity relationship of supported metal oxide catalysts. C.A. Carrero, J. Moncada 2:45 CATL 418. Shining light on catalysts at work: Multi-wavelength and time-resolved operando Raman spectroscopy. C. Hess 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 CATL 419. On the genesis of early transition metal carbide and nitride supported metal catalysts. W. Wen, Z. Wang, L.T. Thompson 3:45 CATL 420. Monitoring catalyst composition during synthesis and pretreatment with in situ spectroscopy. F.E. Celik, A. Pennington, G. Tsilomelekis 4:10 CATL 421. What can operando Cu K-edge XAS tell us about the mechanism and active sites in the selective conversion of methane to methanol by Cu/Zeolites and silica or alumina-supported well-defined Cu-sites? M. Newton, A.J. Knorpp, J. Meyet, V. Sushkevich, D. Palagin, A.B. Pinar, C. Coperet, J. van Bokhoven 4:35 CATL 422. Non-Innocent Solvents, Hydrogen Transfer, Oxygen Dissociation on Nanoparticles during the Direct Synthesis of H2O2. J. Adams, N. Wilson, P. Priyadarshini, A. Chemburkar, Y. Lu, A.M. Karim, M. Neurock, D. Flaherty 5:00 CATL 423. In situ/operando spectroscopy and DFT studies of OCM catalyst electronic/molecular structure. D. Kiani, S. Sourav, I.E. Wachs, J. Baltrusaitis

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Advanced Catalytic Materials with Well-Defined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability A. Orlov, Organizer D. Su, S. Zhang, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 424. Catalytic water oxidation over graphenesupported cobalt catalysts. M. Zaheer 1:20 CATL 425. Hydrophilic-hydrophobic dual catalyst layer electrode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells under low humidity. C. Roh, J. Choi, H. Lee 1:40 CATL 426. Intermetallic core/shell L10-FePt/Pt nanoparticles for efficient oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. S. Sun, J. Li 2:10 CATL 427. Structural behavior of shaped alloy during electrocatalysis. C. Cui

2:40 Intermission. 3:00 CATL 428. Atomically precise metal nanoclusters for water splitting and CO2 reduction. D. Jiang 3:30 CATL 429. Materials design on highly efficient water splitting catalysis. S. Guo 4:00 CATL 430. Physical and chemical tuning of catalysts for water splitting and fuel cell electrocatalysis. H. Wang 4:30 CATL 431. Advanced nano-engineered oxygen electrocatalysts for fuel cells and batteries. Z. Chen

SECTION E Renaissance Boston Waterfront Thompson

Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems Transport & Reactions in Liquid-Solid & Gas-LiquidSolid Systems J. Faria, F. Neira Dangelo, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CATL 432. Stimuli responsive partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems and opportunities for catalyst recycling. B. Schuur 1:35 CATL 433. Catalytic induced flow: Increasing production by using less catalyst. A. Visan, R.G. Lammertink 2:05 CATL 434. Towards improving reactor performance through combined monitoring and modelling of multiphase flows. K. Buist, J. Kuipers 2:35 CATL 435. Mass transfer inside porous catalyst bodies in liquid phase operation. L. Lefferts, P. Xu, R. Espinosa, S. Agarwal, F. Mugele 3:05 CATL 436. Limitations of heat and mass transfer processes in reactive gas-liquid-solid systems. M. Baltussen 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 CATL 437. Acceptorless dehydrogenative cyclization for the synthesis of heterocylces in water catalyzed by a water-soluble metal-ligand bifunctional catalyst. F. Li 4:10 CATL 438. Polyphenylene as an exceptional catalyst platform for cross coupling and hydration at water-oil interface. F.R. Wang 4:40 CATL 439. Water microdroplets catalyze chemical reactions. J. Lee, H. Nam, R.N. Zare

WEDNESDAY EVENING Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon G

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers K. Lin, J. A. Lopez-Ruiz, Presiding 8:00 CATL 440. Heterogeneously catalyzed hydration of alkynes by tin-molybdenum mixed oxide. D. Rathnayake, S.L. Suib 8:20 CATL 441. “Green” route for the alkylation of cyclohexene using mesoporous molybdenum oxide. W. Thalgaspitiya, T. Premalal, S.L. Suib 8:40 CATL 442. Pathways mediating byproduct formulation in partial oxidation of acrolein to acrylic acid. J.H. Miller, A. Bhan 9:00 CATL 443. Investigating the acid site distribution of a new generation methyl chloride synthesis catalyst. D. Lennon, J. Winfield 9:20 CATL 444. In situ DRIFTS investigation of the interactions between methanol and ceria nanoparticles as a function of temperature. P. Huttunen, S. Martell, M.C. Foster 9:40 Intermission. 10:10 CATL 445. Evaluating the positive role of water on solid acid catalyzed reactions. S. Crossley 10:50 CATL 446. Photoreactions of monolayer MoS2 in ambient conditions. B. Birmingham, J. Yuan, M. Filez, D. Fu, J. Hu, M.O. Scully, J. Lou, B.M. Weckhuysen, Z. Zhang 11:10 CATL 447. NiAu single atom alloys for the for the oxidative coupling of methacrolein with methanol. A. Trimpalis, G. Giannakakis, M. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos 11:30 CATL 448. Benzylamine hom*o coupling by ordered mesoporous nano-cobalt oxide: Relationship to the mammalian monoamine oxidase. T. Premalal, W. Thalgaspitiya, S.L. Suib 11:50 CATL 449. In operando FTIR spectroscopy of challenging to monitor catalytic reactions. J. Speed

SECTION B Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon H

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach Novel Materials & Interfaces D. Jiang, Organizer, Presiding A. Vojvodic, Presiding 8:00 CATL 450. Designing metal and 2D-material interfaces for active and stable single atom catalysts. V. Fung, Z. Wu, D. Jiang 8:20 CATL 451. Fundamental understanding of optimal interlayer spacing of MoS2 catalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction. Q. Jin, N. Liu, B. Chen, D. Mei 8:50 CATL 452. Influence of surface adsorbate interactions on the reaction kinetics of methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. P. Wu, B. Yang 9:10 CATL 453. Reaction mechanisms of dry reforming of methane on nickel. W. Lin, G.C. Schatz 9:30 Intermission. 9:40 CATL 454. Tailoring interface and surface in metalsupport microenvironment for catalysis. H. Zhu, Z. Wu, S. Dai 10:15 CATL 455. C–H bond activation at ceria-supported vanadia clusters. T. Kropp, J.A. Paier, J. Sauer 10:35 CATL 456. Free energy surfaces for the Volmer reaction. Y. Lam, Z. Goldsmith, A. Soudackov, S. HammesSchiffer 11:05 CATL 457. Computational studies of alkanol catalysis on SrTiO3 perovskite surfaces. R.C. Chapleski, S. Roy 11:25 CATL 458. H2 adsorption on Pd/Ag(111) studied with STM, XPS, and DFT. M. van Spronsen, K. Duanmu, P. Sautet, C.M. Friend 11:45 CATL 459. Efficient increase in CO oxidation activity of Pt catalysts stabilized at CeOx-TiO2 interface: Combinatorial study of theory and experiment. M. Yoo, H. Ha, S. Lee, J. Choi, E. Kang, C. Kim, W. Jung, H. Kim 12:05 CATL 460. High-surface-area, intelligent Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition. C. Lin

SECTION C Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 1

Operando Spectroscopy for Catalysis J. J. Bravo-Suarez, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 CATL 461. Time-resolved XAFS spectroscopy uncovers multiple roles of the Ce4+/Ce3+ redox couple in the mechanism of low temperature CO oxidation. O.V. Safonova, R. Kopelent, J. van Bokhoven, M. Nachtegaal 8:25 CATL 462. Infrared absorption spectroscopy in operando studies of catalytic reactions. F. Zaera 8:50 CATL 463. Carbocation chemistry on solid acid catalysts observed by in situ spectroscopy. F. Jentoft 9:15 CATL 464. CO adsorption and reaction on catalytic surfaces: examples of reaction intermediates, spectator species and alloy segregation triggered by CO dissociation. F.C. Meunier, Y. Schuurman, N. Guilhaume, L. Cardenas 9:40 CATL 465. In-situ/operando study of ceria supported Ru and Ru alloys: Identifying the catalytic active structure for methane dry reforming. Z. Liu, S.D. Senanayake 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 CATL 466. Kinetic analysis of methane dry reforming on Rh in operando-Raman annular reactor. G. Moroni, A. Donazzi, M. Maestri 10:40 CATL 467. In situ ATR-IR studies in aqueous phase reforming of hydroxyacetone on Pt catalysts. K. Koichumanova, R. Cortese, L. Lefferts 11:05 CATL 468. Operando UV-visible spectroscopy of high temperature water gas shift catalysts. B. Hallac, J.C. Brown, E. Stavitski, R.G. Harrison, M. Argyle 11:30 CATL 469. Mapping the reverse water-gas shift reaction network over oxide-based catalysts using operando SSITKA coupled with time-resolved IR spectroscopy. N.C. Nelson, M. Nguyen, V. Glezakou, R. Rousseau, J. Szanyi 11:55 CATL 470. Operando spectroscopy of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. E.S. Smotkin, J.H. Doan, N. Loupe, J. Goulart

SECTION D Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Advanced Catalytic Materials with Well-Defined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability A. Orlov, Organizer D. Su, S. Zhang, Organizers, Presiding

113

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

Fundamental Understanding of Catalysis at Interface through Computational Approach Interfaces for Thermal Catalysis

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CATL/CELL 8:00 CATL 471. Advanced architectures of nanostructured electrocatalysts guided by well-defined surface studies. N. Becknell, P. Papa Lopes, H. Lv, E. Coleman, D. Strmcnik, N.M. Markovic, V. Stamenkovic 8:30 CATL 472. Stabilizing M (Fe, Co) by intermetallic L10-MPt and enhanced oxygen reduction reaction catalysis in core/shell L10-MPt/Pt for fuel cells. J. Li, S. Sun 8:50 CATL 473. Electrocatalysts from surface atom engineering via bulk synthesis. Y. Shao 9:20 CATL 474. Composition-tunable PtPdCu nanoparticle catalysts with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction. Z. Wu, E. Hopkins, K. Park, J. Wen, J. Wang, J. Luo, V. Petkov, L. Wang, C. Zhong 9:40 CATL 475. Fully ordered Pt3Co intermetallic nanoparticles derived from metal-organic framework for oxygen reduction. G. Wu 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 CATL 476. Advanced electrocatalysts from nanostructured pyrite-type materials. M. Gao 10:50 CATL 477. Low overpotential for electrochemically reducing CO2 to CO on nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots-wrapped single crystalline gold nanoparticles. J. Fu, J. Zhu 11:10 CATL 478. Non-noble-metal-based electrocatalysts for water electrolysis. S. Chen 11:40 CATL 479. Electrocatalytic hydrodechlorination reaction on Pd-based materials and the related environmental applications. G. Jiang

9:20 CATL 493. Highly efficient quinone-catalyzed aerobic dehydrogenation of N-substituted indolines to indoles. B. Li, S.S. Stahl, A. Wendlandt 9:40 CATL 494. Oxidase catalysis via aerobically generated hypervalent iodine intermediates. D.C. Powers 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 CATL 495. Effect of peptide/protein purity on biotemplated nanoparticle synthesis: Morphologies, properties, and ultimate cost. A. Mosleh, R. Tejada, L.F. Greenlee, N. Bedford, M. Beyzavi, R. Beitle 10:30 CATL 496. Rational design of mimic multi-enzyme systems in hierarchically porous biomimetic metal-organic frameworks. X. Liu, W. Qi, Y. Wang 10:50 CATL 497. Photo-induced polymerization and reconfigurable assembly of multifunctional ferrocenetyrosine: Applications in mimic enzyme and energy storagy. X. Yang, Y. Wang, W. Qi 11:10 CATL 498. Cleaning up biocatalysis: A modular heterogeneous platform for H2-driven enzymatic reactions. J. Rowbotham, H. Reeve, O. Lenz, K. Vincent 11:30 CATL 499. Activation mode and origin of selectivity in chiral phosphoric acid-catalyzed oxacycle formation by intramolecular oxetane desymmetrizations. R. Maji, S.E. Wheeler 11:50 CATL 500. Carbon dioxide mediated C-H activation for the functionalization of amines: A traceless directing group strategy. M. Kapoor, M. Young, P.C. Thakuri

SECTION E

THURSDAY AFTERNOON

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon F

SECTION D

Water (The Greenest Solvent): Catalysis in Aqueous & Bi-Phase Systems Tailoring Catalysts for Operating in Liquid Environments

Advanced Catalytic Materials with Well-Defined Nanostructures for Energy & Fuel Sustainability

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Atlantic Ballroom 2

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Brewster

A. Orlov, Organizer D. Su, S. Zhang, Organizers, Presiding 1:00 CATL 501. Stabilization of catalytic surfaces using bimetallic core-shell structures. W. Diao, A. Wong, J. Tengco, J.R. Regalbuto, J.R. Monnier 1:20 CATL 502. Metal-organic framework-derived highly nitrogen doped carbon support for palladium catalyzed deoxygenation at room temperature. S. Dutta, B. Saha, D.G. Vlachos 1:40 CATL 503. Platinum-silver bimetallic nanostructures for high-performing catalysis. H. Yang 2:10 CATL 504. Production of hydrogen gas from water under mild hydrothermal conditions using nanostructured cobalt. A. Jawhari, D.K. Ryan 2:30 Intermission. 2:40 CATL 505. In situ investigation of nucleation, growth, and corrosion behaviors of core-shell electocatalysts. H. Shan, Y. Ma, W. Chen, T. Deng, J. Wu 3:10 CATL 506. Nanocubic Cu catalysts for selective C–C coupling in electrochemical CO2 reduction. K. Jiang, H. Wang 3:30 CATL 507. Embedding enzymes into metal-organic frameworks via a de novo approach. C. Tsung 4:00 CATL 508. Polycarbonate assisted bi-walled multiscale cathode for high-performance solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) at 500 °C. S. Shin, J. Kil, J. Choi, C. Lee, H. Kim, J. Son, H. Shin, M. Choi 4:20 CATL 509. Nanosized zeolite Y synthesis using novel heterocyclic amines as structural directing agents. V. Tzitzios, M. Katsiotis, T. Kranidis, T. Anjana, S. Al Hassan 4:40 CATL 510. MOF nanocrystals confined within mesoporous materials (HyperMOFs) as novel platform for developing well-defined nanostructured catalysts. I. Luz, M. Soukri, M.A. Lail

General Catalysis

SECTION E

K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers J. Kruger, D. Vardon, V. Vorotnikov, Presiding 8:00 CATL 489. Renewable isoprene by sequential hydrogenation of itaconic acid and dehydra-decyclization of 3-methyl-tetrahydrofuran. O. Abdelrahman, P.J. Dauenhauer 8:20 CATL 490. In-situ synthesized SAPO-34@kaolin composite catalyst and its application in methanol to olefins. L. Zhang 8:40 CATL 491. Hydrophobic Ce/SBA-15 catalyst for the direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from CO2 and methanol. Y. Pu 9:00 CATL 492. Mesoporous manganese doped cobalt oxide catalysts for selective aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-diformylfuran. S. Biswas

Renaissance Boston Waterfront Pacific Grand Ballroom Salon F

J. Faria, F. Neira Dangelo, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 CATL 480. From biomass to chemicals: Swimming lessons for heterogeneous catalysts. C. Mondelli, G.M. Lari, P.Y. Dapsens, J. Perez-Ramirez 8:30 CATL 481. Kinetics of catalytic reduction of nitrates in water streams. Effects of catalyst deactivation and ammonia adsorption. A. Monzon, E. Romeo, P. Tarifa 9:00 CATL 482. Designing supported bimetallic catalysts for selective oxidation and selective reduction reactions. S. Meenakshisundaram, J. Edwards, Q. He, G. Hutchings 9:40 CATL 483. Colloidal Pd nanoparticles with hydrophobic catalytic sites: Biphasic hydrogenation of olefins in water. C. Garcia, S. Poudel, D. Ortega, Y. Shon 10:00 CATL 484. Hydrogenation of furanics in an aqueous phase: A combined experimental and computational study. R.M. Bababrik, Z. Zhao, D.E. Resasco, B. Wang 10:30 CATL 485. Catalytic processes for hemicelluloses valorisation in batch and continuous modes. L. Vilcocq, Y. Cheah, H. Oliva, E. Rebmann, P. Fongarland 11:00 CATL 486. Stabilization of active Lewis acid metal species through intrapore condensation of alkene reactants during dimerization reactions. I. Aguirrezabal, I. Luz, M. Soukri, M.A. Lail, M.A. Ortuno, N. Lopez, P. Arias 11:20 CATL 487. Reactions in liquid environments - 1. J. Faria 11:40 CATL 488. Consecutive condensations of light oxygenates in aqueous phase over Tin-Niobium mixed oxides acid catalysts. M.E. Domine, A. Fernández-Arroyo, J.M. López-Nieto

SECTION F

114

General Catalysis K. K. Ramasamy, D. E. Resasco, F. Tao, Organizers J. Kruger, D. Vardon, V. Vorotnikov, Presiding 1:00 CATL 511. Regioselectivity of epoxide ring opening with alcohols using heterogeneous Lewis acid catalysts. N.A. Brunelli, N. Deshpande, A. Parulkar, R. Joshi, B. Diep 1:20 CATL 512. Effect of soft template on the synthesis of manganese oxide nano-materials and thier catalytic properties for the selective oxidation of toluene. A. Altaf, A. Badshah 1:40 CATL 513. Molecular engineering of multifunctional monolayers for the cooperative aerobic oxidation of alcohols. A.E. Fernandes, P. Chandra, A.M. Jonas

2:00 CATL 514. Hydrothermal stability of core-shell Pd@ Ce0.5Zr0.5O2/Al2O3 catalyst for automobile three-way reaction. L. Li 2:20 CATL 515. Fabrication of spinel-type PdxCo3-xO4 active sites on 3D ordered meso-macroporous Ce-Zr-O2 with enhanced catalytic activity for soot oxidation. J. Xiong, Y. Wei, J. Liu 2:40 CATL 516. Catalytic behaviors of oxide interface in catalytic oxidation. K. Li 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 CATL 517. On the way to functionalize CO2. A. Poater 3:30 CATL 518. Zirconium hydroxide-based sorptive and catalytic textiles. E.E. Anderson, N. Dugan, N. Hoffman, N. Pomerantz, J. Rossin, R. Rossin, P. Yip 3:50 CATL 519. Enantioselective fluorescent recognition of chiral secondary amino alcohols in the fluorous phase: Leading to high-throughput chiral catalyst screening. X. Wu, J. Marks, C. Wang, C. Zeng, L. Pu 4:10 CATL 520. Recyclable stereoselective heterogeneous secondary amine organocatalysts for enal activation. M. Meazza, R. Rios-Torres, R. Raja 4:30 CATL 521. ReaxFF studies on platinum catalyzed decomposition of space propulsion fuels. D. Depew, J. Wang, S.D. Chambreau, G.L. Vaghjiani 4:50 CATL 522. Self-assembled Salen-Co(III) catalyst through aromatic donor-acceptor interaction and its application in hydrolytic kinetic resolution of epoxides. Y. Liu

CELL

Division of Cellulose and Renewable Materials W. Thielemans, Program Chair

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY C. Cai, M. Dean Smith, Organizers L. Petridis, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:10 CELL 1. Experimental-computational studies on catalytic oxidation of lignin. V.N. Nziko, R. Key, S. Alam, A. Ivanov, J.J. Bozell, J.M. Parks, A. Rudie, T.J. Elder 8:40 CELL 2. Understanding cellulose mechanical properties through imaging, manipulation, and molecular simulation. M.F. Crowley, P.N. Ciesielski, R. Wagner, V.S. Bharadwaj, J. Kilgore, M.E. Himmel 9:10 CELL 3. Binding affinity dependence of lignin-cellulose complexes on cellulose faces and lignin composition. J.V. Vermaas, G. Beckham, M.F. Crowley 9:40 CELL 4. Integrating molecular dynamics, quantum mechanics and solid-state NMR to probe the structure of cellulose in planta. D. Oehme, H. Yang, M. Hong, J.D. Kubicki 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 CELL 5. Modification of lignin and its incorporation into polymers and composites for sustainable building technologies. M. Karunarathna, M.K. Lauer, T. Thiounn, A.G. Tennyson, R.C. Smith 11:00 CELL 6. Diamond-anvil cell spectroscopic studies of the hydrothermal gasification of biomaterials. I.S. Butler, J. Kozinski, M. Thomas, S. Nanda, A.K. Dalai, Z. Fang 11:30 CELL 7. Real-time and online monitoring of biomass consumption processes using FTIR spectroscopy. J. Speed

Excellence in Undergraduate Research in Glycoscience Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Synergistic Approaches to Lignocellulosic Biomass Research Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY C. Cai, L. Petridis, Organizers M. Dean Smith, Presiding 1:30 Introductory remarks. 1:35 CELL 8. Molecular-level driving forces in lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction. J. Smith 2:05 CELL 9. In-situ small-angle neutron scattering investigation of cellulose dissolution. S. Chundawat, L.d. Sousa, S. Pingali, H.M. O’Neill 2:35 CELL 10. Combining deuterium-labeling and neutron scattering to gain molecular-level insights relevant to biomass deconstruction. H.M. O’Neill, R. Shah, S. Pingali, B.R. Evans, L. Petridis, D. Sawada, V. Urban, J. Smith, P. Langan, B.H. Davison 3:05 CELL 11. Fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass and the relationship between the lignin structure and its suitability for catalytic valorization. P.J. Deuss, I. Hita, D. Zijlstra, A. de Santi, K. Barta, E. Heeres 3:35 Intermission. 3:45 CELL 12. Biodiesel as a green solvent to improve the dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. A. Muhammad Ajaz, A. Umer, E. Ahmed Adil 4:15 CELL 13. Real-time visualization of biomass deconstruction during various thermochemical reactions. S. Pingali, H.M. O’Neill, L. Petridis, C. Cai, V. Urban, C. Wyman, A. Ragauskas, J. Smith, B.H. Davison 4:45 CELL 14. Understanding lignocellulose dissolution with atomistic simulations. B. Mostofian 5:15 Concluding Remarks and Discussion.

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

General Posters W. Thielemans, Organizer 7:00 – 9:00 CELL 15. Mechanochemical functionalization of polymers with solid phosphorylating agents and synthesis of flameretardant cellulose nanocrystals. B. Fiss, L. Hatherly, R. Stein, T. Friscic, A.H. Moores CELL 16. Effect of epoxidized cardanol on poly(vinyl chloride) as secondary plasticizer. J. Chen, K. Li CELL 17. Impurities in cellulose nanocrystals and their retardation effects in the hydration of Portland cement pastes. F.J. Montes, R.A. Chowdhury, M. Mavlan, J.P. Youngblood CELL 18. Extraction of nanocellulose from a unique grass spinifex via different methods and it’s application in water purification. R. Joshi, B.S. Hsiao CELL 19. Effect of source and purity of cellulose pulp on the yield and properties of cellulose nanocrystals extracted from forest biomass. G. Kandhola, A. Djioleu, K. Rajan, B.A. Babst, W.L. Headlee, D.J. Carrier, J. Kim CELL 20. Gram-scale synthesis of single-crystalline graphene quantum dots derived from lignin biomass. Z. Ding, X. Wang, R. Sun CELL 21. Fully water-soluble and biodegradable highperformance transient sensors on a low-cost, ultrathin galactomannan substrate. Z. Cheng, N. Yi, H. Zhu

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

General Posters Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials CNC/CNF Nanocellulose Composites Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY A. Albertsson, S. Percec, Organizers U. Edlund, S. Percec, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CELL 22. Understanding and modulating surface interactions at cellulose nanocrystal surfaces. S. Lombardo, W. Thielemans 8:35 CELL 23. Preparation of interpenetrating polymer networks from natural rubber and polysaccharide. P. Yu, H. He, Y. Luo, D. Jia, A. Dufresne 9:05 CELL 24. Preparation, characterization and utilization of low density networks from cellulose nanofibrils. L. Wagberg 9:35 CELL 25. Advanced TEMPO-mediated oxidation of cellulose: Preparation of TEMPO-CNCs and layer-bylayer peeling of surface cellulose molecules on cellulose microfibrils. A. Isogai 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 CELL 26. Biobased polymers for the development of structure and functions: from bio-fabrication to arts and design. B. Tardy, J. Lehtonen, L. Greca, N. Yau, B. Mattos, J. Beidler, O.J. Rojas 10:45 CELL 27. Engineered polysaccharide materials from biorefining of terrestrial and marine biomass. U. Edlund, A. Svärd, M. Sterner, N. Wahlström 11:15 CELL 28. Super gas barrier and flame retardant behavior of clay/cellulose nanofibril multilayer thin films. S. Qin, M. Pour, S. Lazar, Y. Song, J. Gerringer, L. Wagberg, J.C. Grunlan 11:35 CELL 29. Cage-like cellulose nanofiber-based microcapsules for electrochemical and biosensor applications. T. Paulraj, G.A. Crespo, A. Svagan 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials Synthesis of Renewable Materials Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY A. Albertsson, S. Percec, Organizers A. M. Kasko, M. K. Osterberg, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CELL 30. Selective modification of polysaccharides: Towards controlled and useful architectures. K.J. Edgar, J. Chen, B.L. Nichols, C.E. Frazier, A. Norris 1:35 CELL 31. Synthesis and physical properties of polysaccharide linear and branched ester derivatives. T. Iwata 2:05 CELL 32. Novel applications of lignin: Spatially confined lignin nanospheres for biocatalytic ester synthesis in aqueous media. M.H. Sipponen, M. Farooq, M.K. Osterberg 2:35 CELL 33. Aromatic-aliphatic poly(ester-amides) and poly(ether-amides) synthesized from monolignol-based precursors. B. Upton, R. Foley, A.M. Kasko 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 CELL 34. Design of biodegradable cellulosic nanomaterials combining mechanical strength and optical transmittance. L. Berglund, X. Yang 3:45 CELL 35. Closed cycle production of colloidal lignin particles and their functionalization with silver for antimicrobial applications. K. Lintinen, M.K. Osterberg, M. Kostiainen 4:15 CELL 36. Application of cellulose nanofibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFBs). F. Fahma, A. Takemura 4:35 CELL 37. 3D-printable nanocellulose/alginate emulsion gels containing poly(lactic acid). S. Huan, R. Ajdary, V. Klar, L. Bai, O.J. Rojas 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

Structures & Functions of Glycans Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, CELL, MEDI and ORGN

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Thermochemical & Biochemical Processes Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix W. Thielemans, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 5, 15-16, 18-21, 28, 37. See previous listings. 44, 52, 57-58, 61, 63, 67-68, 72-73, 75. See subsequent listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials Nanoparticle Structures & Properties Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY S. Percec, Organizer A. Albertsson, Organizer, Presiding K. Odelius, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CELL 38. Programming biological membrane mimics with sequence-defined Janus glycodendrimers derived from natural phenolic acids. V. Percec 8:35 CELL 39. Renewable, degradable, and high-performing aliphatic polyester elastomers. M.A. Hillmyer 9:05 CELL 40. Design of renewable polymeric materials through ring-opening reactions. K. Odelius 9:35 CELL 41. Polymer nanostructures for bioapplications: From stem cells enrichment to drug delivery. M. Monteiro 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 CELL 42. Chain extended and crosslinked bio-based polyesters, polycarbonates and polyamides. J. Seppala 10:45 CELL 43. Ring opening copolymerization of polylactone and poly(propylene fumarate) block copolymers for use in medical applications. S.R. Petersen, J.A. Wilson, M. Becker 11:15 CELL 44. Tetra-functional furan-based epoxy-amine thermosetting systems with superior characteristics. X. Chu, S.K. Yadav, J. Vergara, J. La Scala, G.R. Palmese 11:35 CELL 45. In situ preparation and properties of graphene-reinforced biobased unsaturated polyester nanocomposites. C. Liu, Y. Hu, Y. Zhou 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

Enzymes in Glycoscience Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Hydrogen, Biofuels & Biomass Upgrading Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Rational Design of Multifunctional RenewableResourced Materials New Applications Cosponsored by CARB, ENVR and POLY A. Albertsson, Organizer S. Percec, Organizer, Presiding M. Hakkarainen, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks.

115

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CELL/CHED 1:35 CELL 46. Carbonized biopolymers as building blocks in renewable materials. M. Hakkarainen 2:05 CELL 47. Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoates with diverse structures as multifunctional materials. G. Chen 2:35 CELL 48. Injectable and self-healing polysaccharide hydrogels via boronate ester bonds: Relationships between the binding mode of boronic acids to saccharide moieties and the macroscopic mechanical properties. R. Auzely-Velty 3:05 CELL 49. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of silk and elastin-like polypeptides as renewable materials. K. Numata 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 CELL 50. Developing sustainable printing inks using biochar as a substitute for carbon black. S. Lauro, Y. Goh, D. Parulski-Seager, S. Williams, S. Barber, T. Trabold 4:10 CELL 51. Biomass-derived nitrogen self-doped porous carbon for high performance supercapacitors. F. Shen 4:30 CELL 52. Revealing the dynamic formation process and mechanism of morphology-controlled hollow structured carbon particles: From bowl to sphere. X. Liu, X. Zhang 4:50 CELL 53. Mechanical properties and highly ordered structure analysis of curdlan propionate and its melt spun fiber. T. Kabe, T. Iwata 5:10 Concluding remarks.

Enzymes in Glycoscience Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Glycoprotein & Carbohydrate-Based Drugs for Human Health Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Thermochemical & Biochemical Conversions of Biomass to Biofuels & Biomaterials for Energy & Environmental Applications Biochars & Renewable Carbons Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY M. Anyfantakis, V. A. Davis, B. Frka-Petesic, J. Lagerwall, Y. Ogawa, Organizers S. Vignolini, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CELL 54. Anisotropic diffusion and phase behaviour of cellulose nanocrystal suspensions. J. Van Rie, A. Gençer, S. Lombardo, C. Schütz, K. Kang, W. Thielemans 8:30 CELL 55. Orientation relaxation dynamics of cellulose nanocrystal dispersions. M. Pospisil, P. Saha, M.M. Noor, V.A. Davis, M.J. Green 8:55 CELL 56. Using Rheo-SANS and Rheo-Optics to understand the shear response of cellulose nanocrystal dispersions. P. Saha, M.M. Noor, K.M. Weigandt, M.J. Green, V.A. Davis 9:20 CELL 57. Influence of hydrodynamic flows on the formation of cellulose nanocrystal films from sessile drops drying at different humidities. J. Lagerwall, B. Dupas, M. Anyfantakis 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 CELL 58. Investigation of crystalline domains alignment in the cellulose nanocrystal films with an improved birefringence technique. R.A. Chowdhury, J.P. Youngblood 10:25 CELL 59. Fractionation of cellulose nanocrystals enhances liquid crystal ordering without promoting gelation. C. Honorato, C. Lehr, C. Schütz, R. Sanctuary, M. Osipov, J. Baller, J. Lagerwall 10:50 CELL 60. On the effect of electrolytes on the tunable mesomorphic behavior of cellulose nanocrystal films. S. Jin, R.J. Spontak 11:15 CELL 61. Hygroscopic swelling determination of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films by polarized light microscopy digital image correlation. S. Shrestha, J. Diaz, S. Ghanbari, J.P. Youngblood 11:40 Concluding Remarks.

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Catalysis for Environmental & Energy Applications Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CATL, CELL, ENFL and I&EC

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Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY M. Anyfantakis, V. A. Davis, B. Frka-Petesic, Y. Ogawa, S. Vignolini, Organizers J. Lagerwall, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CELL 62. Bio-inspired photonics: From nature to applications. S. Vignolini 2:00 CELL 63. Flexible photonic materials based on cellulose nanocrystals with different morphologies. V. Korolovych, R. Geryak, V. Cherpak, D. Nepal, A. Ng, R. Xiong, T. Bunning, V.V. Tsukruk 2:25 CELL 64. Tuning chiral nematic pitch of biosourced photonic films via electrostatic repulsion. Z. Cheng, Y. Ma, H. Zhu 2:50 CELL 65. Coassembly of cellulose nanocrystals and latex nanospheres in suspensions and in stratified films. E. Kumacheva, M. Mitov, L. Bergstrom, H.H. Wensink 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 CELL 66. Nanocellulose-based self-assembled materials: In-situ SAXS studies, processing and properties. L. Bergstrom 3:55 CELL 67. Critical discussion of electromechanical coupling properties of cellulose. I. Chae, Z. Ounaies, S.H. Kim 4:20 CELL 68. Roll-to-roll fabrication of anisotropic cellulose nanocrystal coatings for packaging application. R.A. Chowdhury, J.P. Youngblood, C. Clarkson 4:45 CELL 69. Surface-modified conducting chiral nematic mesoporous cellulose/polypyrrole composite films. E. Lizundia, T. Nguyen, J. Vilas, W.Y. Hamad, M.J. MacLachlan 5:10 Concluding Remarks.

New Directions in Carbohydrate Synthesis Sponsored by CARB, Cosponsored by CELL

Diet, Health & Gut Microbiome Sponsored by AGFD, Cosponsored by AGRO, BIOL, CARB and CELL

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Aloft Boston Seaport Mahoney Ex:Change

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY M. Anyfantakis, B. Frka-Petesic, J. Lagerwall, Y. Ogawa, S. Vignolini, Organizers V. A. Davis, Organizer, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CELL 70. Connecting micro- and mesoscale chirality in nematic fluids: Insights from simple models. H.H. Wensink, S. Ruzicka, L.M. Anda, C. Ferreiro-Córdova 8:30 CELL 71. Broadband reflectors, multiwavelength mirrors, patterned polarizers: The shining world of beetles. M. Mitov 8:55 CELL 72. Superhydrophilic wrinkle-free cotton fabrics via nanofluid treatment. L. Lao, L. Fu, G. Qi, E.P. Giannelis, J. Fan 9:20 CELL 73. Highly proton conductive nitro-oxidized cellulose nanopaper for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. S.K. Sharma, P.R. Sharma, H. Chen, B.S. Hsiao 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 CELL 74. Thermally responsive bio-polymer flexible hydrogels as solid state electrolyte for supercapacitior. H. Hailong, M. Xu 10:25 CELL 75. Efficient removal of arsenic from water using regenerated microfibrillated cellulose supported zinc oxide/hydroxide nanoparticles. P.R. Sharma, S.K. Sharma, R. Antoine, B.S. Hsiao 10:50 CELL 76. New organosolv lignin for carbon fiber application. T. Stevanovic Janezic, G. Koumba 11:15 CELL 77. Cellulose nanocrystals in organic electronics. W.Y. Hamad 11:40 Discussion and Concluding Remarks.

CHED

Division of Chemical Education A. Marsh, D. Bromfield-Lee and P. Daubenmire, Program Chairs

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1/2

Chemistry Teachers Day Program Cosponsored by PROF S. C. Rukes, Organizer, Presiding A. N. Serkin, Presiding 8:00 Registration. 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 1. Chemistry science investigation: Dognapping. A workshop to inspire STEM students. T.J. Boyle, B.A. Hernandez-Sanchez, J.M. Sears 9:00 CHED 2. Chemistry in three-dimensions (of NGSS): Connecting ideas, practices, and concepts – with data collection. T.M. Loschiavo 9:40 CHED 3. Development of the flame test concept inventory: Measuring student thinking about atomic emission. S. Bretz, A.V. Mayo 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 CHED 4. Pathways to entrepreneurship in sustainability and chemistry. S.W. Sheehan 10:45 CHED 5. Experimenting with algae in the classroom. A. Potter, S. Rukes 11:25 CHED 6. Lab practicals as common summative assessments. C. Koutros 11:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Beacon Hill 1

Informal STEM Education: Innovation & Collaboration Cosponsored by CCA, CPRC and PROF D. I. Lewis, D. F. Sittenfeld, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 7. Sharing science with society: ACS Chemistry Festival Program and Festival Training Institutes. L. Raines, B. Miller, I. Montes 8:55 CHED 8. Chemists Celebrate Earth Day events by Northeastern Section of American Chemical Society (NESACS) and Museum of Science (MoS), Boston: A golden opportunity for students to develop soft-skills. J. Ranga 9:15 CHED 9. The Tennessee STEAM Festival: A state-wide collaboration in Informal Science Education. P.J. MacDougall, T. MacDougall 9:35 CHED 10. Community college Science Slam: Activities to engage the public in STEM and health sciences. R.A. Weintraub, B. Ameer 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 11. Science story time and a preschool audience. T.A. Halmi, H.N. Myers 10:30 CHED 12. NESACS National Chemistry Week: Recruit, prepare, engage. S. Lam 10:50 CHED 13. Empowering undergraduates to be green chemistry ambassadors in their community through outreach. S. Choudhry, A. Calnan, R. Marks, V. Ganss 11:10 CHED 14. Empowering K-12 students to be STEM ambassadors. G. Rubino, R. Derival 11:30 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Use of Computer Simulation to Teach Chemical Kinetics & Enzyme Kinetics in Undergraduate Research & Education Cosponsored by BIOL and COMP D. K. Wicht, Organizer K. A. Johnson, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 CHED 15. KinTek Explorer: Getting the students’ feet wet. J. Potratz

Women of Color in the Academy: Empirical Studies & Models of Success Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHED and WCC

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1/2

Chemistry Teachers Day Program Cosponsored by PROF S. C. Rukes, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 CHED 22. Assessing student growth in chemistry using standards based grading. M.A. Chapman 1:35 CHED 23. Inquiry lab into the nature of color: Student design and discovery. H.W. Zimmer 2:10 CHED 24. More “bang for the buck”: Short laboratory activities to explore multiple concepts. S.M. Palmer 2:45 Intermission. 2:50 CHED 25. Discovery learning: Development of a unique active learning environment for introductory chemistry. W.R. Lacourse, L. Ott 3:15 CHED 26. Chemistry is out of this world! K.M. Kaleuati 3:45 CHED 27. Metal-organic framework nanospheres for smart drug delivery. C. Tsung, A.P. Young 4:10 Intermission. 4:15 CHED 28. Organizing chemistry instruction around scientific models. T. Marx, E. Posthuma-Adams 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Beacon Hill 1

Informal STEM Education: Innovation & Collaboration Cosponsored by CCA, CPRC and PROF D. I. Lewis, D. F. Sittenfeld, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 29. Sharing the joy of chemistry with kids of all ages: Remembering Phyllis A. Brauner. B.Z. Shakhashiri 1:55 CHED 30. ChemAttitudes: Developing and disseminating strategies and materials to support chemistry interest, relevance, and self-efficacy. D.F. Sittenfeld, M.M. Kirchhoff, R. Ostman, E.K. Kollmann, L. Bell 2:15 CHED 31. Facilitation techniques for hands-on activities that increase feelings of interest, relevance, and self-efficacy in chemistry. A. Anderson, M. Beyer, E.K. Kollmann, M. Bequette 2:35 CHED 32. Science magic tricks to inspire and motivate very, very, very young students. R. Silvestri 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 CHED 33. Communicating Chemistry to undergraduate students at various outreach events. M. Chatterjee 3:30 CHED 34. Collaborative partnerships between K-12 teachers/informal educators and scientists. S. Kelly 3:50 CHED 35. Energy and U: Teaching elementary school students thermodynamics through explosions, lasers, and dancing. J. Ting, J. DeWilde, E.P. Rangnekar, J.E. Franek, F.S. Bates, M.A. Hillmyer, D.A. Blank 4:10 CHED 36. Let’s talk about water: How to engage with the general public about fundamentals and recent advancements in water treatment. A. Mulchandani, A.C. Barrios 4:30 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Undergraduate Research Papers Cosponsored by SOCED C. V. Gauthier, J. V. Ruppel, Organizers N. L. Snyder, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 37. GC-MS analysis of Chinese Baijiu spirit flavored as American whiskey. C. Mastorovich, R. Silvestri 1:45 CHED 38. Development of a method to quantitatively determine the fidelity of mutant polymerases. S. Barrett, A. Leconte 1:55 CHED 39. New insight into the preparation of flame-retardant thermoplastic polyether ester utilizing betacyclodextrin as a charring agent. J. Li 2:05 CHED 40. Olefin chemistry on Au(111)-based catalysts. M. Gillum, J. Wilke, M.C. DePonte, E.M. Maxwell, A.E. Baber 2:15 Intermission. 2:35 CHED 41. Impact of chain architecture on the physical aging of polystyrene thin films. G. Brown, E. Lewis, B.D. Vogt 2:45 CHED 42. Towards spontaneously self-assembled supramolecular rotor systems: Conformational analysis of benzene and p-terphenyl rotators on a host-guest [10] cycloparaphenylene-C60 dyad stator. A. Siddiqui, S. Munoz, P.A. Ayala 2:55 CHED 43. Syntheses, characterizations, and computational studies of SNS copper(I) pincer complexes based on bis-imidazole precursors: Impact of solvent coordination on atropisomeric conformations. S.E. Zygmont, J.R. Miecznikowski, E. Reinheimer, J.P. Jasinski, M.A. Lynn, E.M. Almanza, R.M. Kharbouch 3:05 CHED 44. Quantification of a-synuclein concentration via graphene biosensors. A. Sriram, S. Decker, O. Dickens, K. Luk, A.T. Johnson 3:15 Intermission. 3:35 CHED 45. Ligand-induced stabilization of DNA and RNA G-quadruplex structures. H. Hoang, T. Chiba, M. Pizzuto, C.M. Anderson, S.S. Jain 3:45 CHED 46. Mechanism of PALB2’s interaction with DNA in hom*ologous recombination. L. Kanikkannan, J. Deveryshetty, S. Korolev 3:55 CHED 47. Atomistic models of the lipid matrix in the stratum corneum. E. Wang, J.B. Klauda 4:05 CHED 48. Needle in a haystack: Antibacterial activity-guided fractionation of potato wound tissue extract. M. Perez Rodriguez, K. Dastmalchi, R.E. Stark 4:15 Intermission. 4:35 CHED 49. Characterization of the antioxidant activity of six mushrooms species. A. Farragher-Gnadt, G. Holevinsky, J. Michelotti, E. Sharpe, F. Bou-Abdallah 4:45 CHED 50. Pursuing the secondary structure of cancerrelated DNA repeats using biophysical methods. D. Jordan, B. Powell, L.A. Yatsunyk 4:55 CHED 51. Carcinogenic and neurotoxic risks of acrylamide consumed through caffeinated beverages among the Lebanese population. R. Daher, A. Merhi, G. Naous, M. Mroueh, R. Taleb 5:05 Concluding Remarks.

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

General Posters A. L. Marsh, Organizer 7:00 – 9:00 CHED 52. Exploring exponential decay using limited resources. A. Garafalo, E. DePierro, P. Gordon CHED 53. Sweet, sweet science: Addressing the gender gap in STEM disciplines through a one-day high school program in sugar chemistry. D.J. DiScenza, M. Levine CHED 54. It takes an educational village and a safe leaning environmentt to improving success in introductory chemistry: Lessons learned from one semester introductory chemistry course at a small liberal arts college. M.J. Castaldi, J.K. Murray, S. Lyle, P. Jameson, J. Zhang, J. McHugh CHED 55. Paper to plastics: Combining outreach with new curriculum development. A.S. Wong, A.W. Sudyn, M. Thompson, R. Andrison, J.E. Wissinger, J.A. Byers CHED 56. Using iBooks to create textbooks that match students’ current learning styles. J. Franco, B. Provencher CHED 57. Novel concept for effective teaching of electron configuration: Designing an “Electron House” model as a basic study tool. G.M. Smeureanu, K.J. Grant CHED 58. Application of a practical dye-sensitized solar cell teaching kit in high school energy education. C. Su, S. Chien, C. Chou, H. Wang, W. Li

CHED 59. Development of workforce training and education programs at Lamar University through on -campus, online and onsite educational courses and hands-on laboratory training in Process Analytical Chemistry and Technology (PACT) and Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS). S. Shukla, T. Aminabhavi, P. Chandrasekaran, B. Yu, A. Shukla CHED 60. Implementation of general chemistry supplemental instruction at a regional campus. C. Cady, J.D. Aguirre CHED 61. Investigating the effect of curriculum on gender-minority STEM outreach camp outcomes. K. Tyler, N. Johnson-Glauch, J. Krogstad CHED 62. Studies in SPIRAL: Case studies in development and testing of POGIL laboratory experiments. C.M. Teague, E.C. Bucholtz, S. Fiddler, M.P. Garoutte, T.A. Herzog, A.B. Mahoney, M.D. Perry, M.T. van Opstal, G.H. Webster, R.M. Whitnell CHED 63. Iron and heat content of a hand warmer. D.C. Haagenson CHED 64. Impact of septic systems on Long Island’s aquifer water quality: An Interdisciplinary study. S. Sambasivan, A.N. Migues, K. Gutleber, R. Davan, Z. Al-Masri, B. Golden, N. Leonhardt, C.J. Foley CHED 65. Molecule of the week (MOTW) as a teaching tool in undergraduate education to motivate science learners. F. Manyanga, C. Chen CHED 66. Use of benchtop NMR with classical resolutions to resolve over the counter analgesics; an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. M.A. Bailey, R. Blough, D. Boyd, M.J. Castaldi, R. Espina, J.K. Murray, H. Robert CHED 67. Extending the scope of alcohol oxidations in discovery-oriented organic chemistry laboratories. D.D. Clark, J. Hayco*ck, B. Nelson CHED 68. Carbon in CHCl3 is NOT sp3 hybridized: Tetrahedral geometry does NOT require this. D.D. Clarke CHED 69. AccesSARizing the teaching laboratory. B.A. Haubrich, L. Rochefort, M. Saladino, A. Basu, C. Reid CHED 70. Extensive studies of nucleophilic addition of para-substituted phenol to 4-fluorobenzaldehyde. H. Chen, E. Wiggin, C. Zhang, X. Fan CHED 71. Organic dice: A didactic game for teaching chemistry. C. Rackov, H.Y. Souza CHED 72. Enhancing student learning with Molecule of the Week from ACS. C. Chen, F. Manyanga CHED 73. Course-based research in Organic II: Synthesis of neurolenin derivatives for potential treatment of a neglected tropical disease. K.M. Shea, K.L. Barnett CHED 74. Quantifying activation energy of nucleophilic aromatic substitution on fluorinated porphyrins. W. Rizvi, N.K. Bhupathiraju, S. Siddiqui, C.M. Drain, R. Park CHED 75. Independent research projects in an undergraduate physical organic chemistry course. S.L. Goh CHED 76. Mass spectrometry: Teaching beyond the box. H.M. Gabor, B. Regel, C. DeCarlo, S. Fleishner CHED 77. Design, implementation, and evaluation of an interdisciplinary undergraduate laboratory experiment in paper-based devices for synthetic analyte detection. T. Mako, M. Levine CHED 78. Chemoinformatics courses to enhance the curricula of university students. J. Ruiz-Rios, F.I. SaldívarGonzález, J.L. Medina-Franco CHED 79. Development of near-infrared emitting fluorophores for potential biosensing application. R. Choudhury CHED 80. Determination of fatty acids in coffee using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A.A. Bazzi, J. Bazzi, Y. Deng, F. Ali, A. Badaoui, N. Jaffal, H. Jouni CHED 81. Cyclic voltammetry in the undergraduate teaching laboratory: Determining benzocaine concentrations in aqueous solution using carbon screen-printed electrodes. D.E. Martyn, S.K. Buehler CHED 82. High throughput discovery: A multidisciplinary approach to translational research & education. S. Berritt, D. Schultz, J. Field CHED 83. TAP into chemistry: Using video mini-lessons to address preparation of students for upper-division coursework. A. Manevich CHED 84. Guided inquiry experiment involving the intrinsic viscosity of a polymer in aqueous solution. A.L. Marsh CHED 85. Mantras for graduate education reform: Why the prayers aren’t answered. M.T. Ashby, M.A. Maher CHED 86. Enhancing the learning experience in a nonmajors chemistry class. J.D. Aguirre CHED 87. Development of a rubric to assess scientific writing in the chemistry curriculum. T.J. Dransfield, J. Evans

117

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

9:00 CHED 16. Teaching principles of chemical equilibria using computer simulation methods. E. Taylor, K.A. Johnson 9:20 CHED 17. Use of dynamic computer simulation in teaching chemical kinetics. M. Zewail-Foote 9:40 CHED 18. Use of KinTek Explorer to teach enzyme pre-steady-state kinetics in an advanced undergraduate biochemistry course. E.E. Trimmer 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 CHED 19. Understanding CRISPR-Cas9 Activity using KinTek Explorer Simulation. S. Gong 10:35 CHED 20. Probing the mechanism of DNA Ligase – DNA binding with Kintek Kinetic Explorer. G.J. Lohman 10:55 CHED 21. Using dynamic simulation to teach kinetics. K.A. Johnson

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED CHED 88. Improving the teaching skill of young teachers within teaching team. Z. Wang, Z. Jiang CHED 89. Bridging the gap: The IUPAC Young Observer program. L. Kent, M.M. Rogers, D. Rabinovich CHED 90. Mutually beneficial relationship between students and peer learning assistants in course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs). K. Targos, J. Jennings, A.W. Vater, A.K. Franz

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

General Papers Curriculum S. A. Fleming, Organizer A. V. Mallia, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 91. Factors that influence chemistry students to choose a chemistry-related career. S. Avargil, G. Sterimbaum 8:55 CHED 92. Read this! The use of primary literature in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. R.M. Savizky 9:15 CHED 93. Block-mode delivery of undergraduate chemistry – Designing the curriculum. D. Caridi, S.W. Bigger, A.J. Smallridge 9:35 CHED 94. Assessment across the undergraduate curriculum: Moving toward an integrated capstone experience. J. Zhang, J.K. Murray, M.J. Castaldi, M.A. Bailey, R. Blough 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 95. Preparing second career chemistry teachers. G. Shwartz, Y. Dori 10:30 CHED 96. Creating a viable research program at a small two-year college. J.W. Hartman 10:50 CHED 97. Promoting undergraduate research at an HBCU: Sophom*ore immersion in research and academics program. S.O. Fakayode, G. Byrd, S. Wellman, T.A. Pinder, Z.S. Wilson 11:10 CHED 98. Re-structuring the general chemistry curriculum to faciilitate decision-based lerening. S.G. Wood, K. Plummer, R. Swan 11:30 Intermission. 11:45 CHED 99. Peer-facilitated workshops enhances interactivity and student success in nursing chemistry sequence. K.J. Grant, G.M. Smeureanu 12:05 CHED 100. Effectiveness of the self-regulation skills in partially flipped organic chemistry classroom using learner logs at a 4-year public college. A.V. Mallia 12:25 CHED 101. Use of automated response systems (ARS) in a small, upper-division chemistry class. J.F. Kirby, M. Nabel 12:45 CHED 102. Who does extra credit? A.G. Karatjas, J.A. Webb

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

Science Diplomacy & Chemistry Education The Middle East Cosponsored by IAC and PROF M. Z. Hoffman, Z. M. Lerman, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 103. Science diplomacy in the Soviet Union, Cuba, and the Middle East. Z.M. Lerman 9:05 CHED 104. Malta conferences: Science diplomacy as a bridge to peace in the Middle East. M.Z. Hoffman 9:35 CHED 105. Enzymatic nanoreactors to the rescue. O.K. Farha 10:05 Intermission. 10:15 CHED 106. Intrinsically international geoscience issues are scientific diplomacy opportunities. C.E. Kolb 10:45 CHED 107. Pursuing peace in the Middle East through science education. L. Hogue 11:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Approaches in Using Food & Cooking to Engage Diverse Audiences in Science K. Hollar, V. Maini Rekdla, P. M. Sorensen, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks.

118

8:35 CHED 108. Crystalline vs amorphous solids, a great way to use food science as an introduction to real chemistry. S.B. Mitchell 8:55 CHED 109. Engaging non-science majors: Boston University PY107 – Physics of Food and Cooking. R. Bansil, K. Ludwig 9:15 CHED 110. Chemistry and physics of cooking at Duke: Lessons and perspectives. P. Charbonneau 9:35 Intermission. 9:45 CHED 111. How teaching “Molecular Gastronomy: From Test Tubes to Taste Buds” makes science palatable for all students. P.B. O’Hara 10:05 CHED 112. Designing a chemistry of cooking course with campus dining staff and facilities. L. Tran Lu 10:25 CHED 113. An amuse-bouche of chemistry: Using food to acquire scientific literacy among non-science majors. M. Mulé, J. Foley 10:45 CHED 114. Teaching flavor chemistry and fostering curiosity with food fermentations. P.M. Sorensen 11:05 Intermission. 11:15 CHED 115. Food across Augsburg’s curriculum. B. Stottrup, M. Wentzel, J.R. deVries, A. Green 11:35 CHED 116. Hands-on preparation of aromatic Indian dishes as a way to discuss chemistry and then eat the products. K.K. Bagga 11:55 CHED 117. Young Chefs Program lesson plan development: A student-led independent study project in cooking and science. D.S. Gross, V. Maini Rekdla 12:15 Concluding Remarks.

How to Get Your 1st Industrial Job Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHED, CTA and YCC

Citizen Science & Chemistry Sponsored by ENVR, Cosponsored by CEI and CHED

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

From Nano to Macro: How to Let Students Discover the Applications of Materials Financially supported by IPEC S. C. Rukes, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:40 CHED 118. From nano to macro: A make and take session of multiple demo aids. S.C. Rukes 2:35 CHED 119. Using nanotechology to teach high school chemistry concepts. S.C. Rukes 2:50 CHED 120. Playing with “nano-blocks” enables learning about environmental applications of nanotechnology. A. Mulchandani, A.J. Atkinson, S. GarciaSegura, P.K. Westerhoff 3:20 Intermission. 3:25 CHED 121. Biomimicry: Inventions and innovations inspired by nature. E. Nash, S. McCarron- Stewart 3:55 CHED 122. Microscopic mycelium: Growing sustainable design solutions. R. Derival, E. Nash 4:25 CHED 123. Sustainable textiles: Threads that connect us all. S. McCarron- Stewart, G. Rubino 4:55 CHED 124. The secrets of sharks’ skin. K. Anderson, A. Lambert 5:25 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

Science Diplomacy & Chemistry Education The Middle East & Beyond Cosponsored by IAC and PROF M. Z. Hoffman, Z. M. Lerman, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 125. Health sciences diplomacy as an alternative to political paralysis. A. Taylor 2:05 CHED 126. Synchrotron light sources in developing countries; sesame and others. H. Winick 2:35 CHED 127. IYCN: Young chemists leading positive change. L. Ferrins, C. Rawlins, E. Llabani 3:05 Intermission. 3:15 CHED 128. Formula for a successful international collaboration: The NESACS-GDCh student exchange program. T.R. Gilbert

3:45 CHED 129. Global collaborative STEM education: Opportunities for international high school students to diplomatically exchange insight and perspective on pressing global challenges. S. Kelly, T. Perry 4:15 CHED 130. Building international collaborations through Distributed Drug Discovery (D3). W.L. Scott, J.G. Samaritoni, M.J. O’Donnell 4:45 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Approaches in Using Food & Cooking to Engage Diverse Audiences in Science K. Hollar, V. Maini Rekdla, P. M. Sorensen, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 131. Young Chefs Program: An open-access platform for cooking and science education in the digital age. V. Maini Rekdla 1:55 CHED 132. The Young Chefs Program at Carleton College: Using cooking to teach middle school students science. S. Amagai, R. Fairchild, V. Umscheid, J. Johnson, D.S. Gross 2:15 CHED 133. STEAM and cooking with chef Koochooloo. L. Sabourian 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 CHED 134. SteamEd: Training educators in science and cooking. V. Maini Rekdla, K. Hollar, P.M. Sorensen 3:05 CHED 135. Molecular gastronomists at Georgia Tech: A student club at the intersection of science, culture, and food. M. Evans, E. Ellison 3:25 CHED 136. Engaging doctoral students at the scientific-culinary interface. A. Walker, K.A. Jackson, V. Maini Rekdla, R. Mazitschek, S. Thomas 3:45 CHED 137. Using kitchen chemistry and technology to engage K-12 and college students. E. Nam 4:05 Intermission. 4:35 CHED 138. Improving quality of life in patients through culinary research. G. Gangal, A. Gálvez, T. Massanés 4:55 CHED 139. Effective science communication through cooking. L.H. Zhou 5:15 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Agricultural & Food Chemistry Cosponsored by AGFD and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 140. Determination of pesticide residues at the Food and Drug Administration using the QuEChERS extraction method in conjunction with liquid and gas chromatography. H. Kim, X. Yu, T. Harrison, P.D. Svoronos CHED 141. Elemental analysis of arsenic in rice speciation. K. Kaur, L. Aleo, D. Stutts, P.D. Svoronos CHED 142. Volatile components of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) peel. B. Yates, K. Robinson, C. Richardson, S. Silver, N. Spellman, K. Christian, O.E. Christian CHED 143. Isolation and identification of volatile components from the flowers of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit). U. Ouoha, S. Patel, C. Nkwazema, K. Christian, O.E. Christian

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Analytical Chemistry Cosponsored by ANYL and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 144. Calculation of the ionization constant of carboxylic acids in mixed solvents via freezing point depression measurements. E. Mera, P.D. Svoronos CHED 145. Photoisomerization of piceid: Implications for the analysis of resveratrol. H. Arcure, D.E. Mencer, W. Terzaghi, K. Klemow CHED 146. Extraction of red cabbage and investigation of the various colors based upon pH. M.E. Squires, R. Li CHED 147. Using urinary myoglobin as a biomarker for muscle damage in college athletes. G. Zarro, K. Pangallo

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Biochemistry Cosponsored by BIOL and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 170. Nucleosome assembly on oxidatively damaged DNA. L. Gonzalez, C. Aguirre, M. Klureza, E.R. Jamieson, M. Nunez CHED 171. Efforts towards the structure of a noncanonical DNA repeat implicated in cancer. B. Powell, D. Jordan, J.B. Chaires, W. Dean, R. Marmorstein, E. Brown, L.A. Yatsunyk CHED 172. Biophysical and structural studies of telomeric DNA in complex with a small molecule ligand as an anticancer strategy. Y. Lin, L.A. Yatsunyk CHED 173. Bacterial adhesion measured by atomic force microscopy. A. Walker, C. Peraza, C.B. Volle, M.A. Ferguson, E.M. Spain, M. Nunez CHED 174. Simulations of the effect of caffeine on water permeability across a biological membrane. T. Johnson, W. Peña, S. Lee, R. Versace

CHED 175. New strategy for the synthesis of aminoacylated dinucleotide CpA-aa. R. Rodriguez, C. Brehm, M. Wisniewski, R.C. Nangreave CHED 176. Discovery of new sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitors. E. Mera, M. Pulkoski-Gross CHED 177. Fluorescence and UV-Vis studies of quinoneinduced protein modifications. J. Ewald, C. Thomas, J. Kim, T.V. Albu CHED 178. Bacterial nucleic acid quadruplex formation. A. Cecere, S. Shepardson-Fungairiño, H. Murayama, M. Nunez CHED 179. Thermodynamics of glutathione binding to Fe(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II): An isothermal titration calorimetry study. J. Paliakkara, F. Bou-Abdallah CHED 180. Effect of chaotropes on the kinetics of iron release from ferritin by flavin nucleotides. N. Flint, L. Johnson, T. Wilkinson, P. Arosio, A. Melman, F. BouAbdallah CHED 181. Inhibition of histone deacetylases by dihydroxamate-containing compounds. L. Bayless, S. Kim CHED 182. Interaction between the twin arginine transport receptor protein, cpTatC, and the transporting precursor mature peptide. K. Hird, G. Thomas, C. Dabney-Smith CHED 183. In vitro effects of mushroom extracts on brain tumor cells. O. Gharib CHED 184. Investigating the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with Gram-positive biofilms. R. MacVickar, T. Mashaka, M. Nunez, C.B. Volle CHED 185. Investigation of factors that trigger essential conformational changes in FTT258. A.A. Hossain, R. Johnson CHED 186. Characterization of modified-DNA polymerase fidelity. M.K. Seto, A.M. Leconte CHED 187. Ester-protected ethambutol derivatives. E. Kile, R. Johnson CHED 188. Nanomaterials interact with artificial lipid bilayers. M. Skinner, R. Warmoth, S. Lee CHED 189. Model cell membranes are perturbed by antiinflammatory drugs. M. Wood, M.J. Morales, S. Lee CHED 190. Permeability of unsaturated lipid membranes: Effect of alpha-tocopherol. S. Foley, S. Lee CHED 191. Control of membrane water permeability in asymmetric droplet interface bilayer. B. OSullivan, M.J. Morales, S. Lee CHED 192. Differential scanning calorimetric study of the effect of small molecules on the thermal behavior of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer. A. Jagarnath, B. OSullivan, S. Lee CHED 193. Investigation of functionally essential cysteine residues within human ghrelin O-acyltransferase. M. Aiduk, T. Davis, J. Hougland CHED 194. Sarkosyl: A milder detergent than SDS for identifying proteins with modest hyperstability using gel electrophoresis. J. Patrick, J. Thibeault, K. Xia, A. Martin, S. Hill, J. Sen, W. Colon CHED 195. Enzyme kinetics of amylase in the presence of sucralose by the iodine-starch method. J.D. Popolow, P.S. Oscar, T.A. Trumbo Bell CHED 196. Comparison of balance error scoring system scores and salivary glial fibrillary acidic protein concentration in adult soccer players as markers for mTBI. A.P. Martin, C.P. Holdren, T.A. Trumbo Bell CHED 197. Comparative analysis of the different technologies used in metabolomics and creation of a gutmicrobiome resource kit for high-school curriculum. V. Joshi, S. Sarangi, E. Angle CHED 198. Isolation of glycoside hydrolases towards the goal of universal blood. D. Leyva, M. Gallo CHED 199. Effects of electrophiles on the heat shock response system. E. Trost, M. Sternick, R.E. Connor CHED 200. Exploring a possible moonlighting role for global phosphatase in S. pneumonia. H. Sellers, N.E. Grossoehme CHED 201. Investigation and preparation of novel formulations comprised of exotic butters and marine algae as antimicrobial surfaces. M. Lopata, J.I. Rizzo, K. Melkonian, K. McLeod CHED 202. Effects of multiple amino acid mutations of a key quorum sensing peptide, CSP-1. K. Chichura, B. Koirala, Y. Tal-Gan, M.A. Bertucci CHED 203. Structural impacts of substituting dialkylated amino acids into a beta-sheet peptide. A. Weber, G. Lengyel CHED 204. Investigation of the structure of G-quadruplex DNA in complex with porphyrin ligand. Y. Manurung, Y. Lin, L.A. Yatsunyk

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Biotechnology Cosponsored by BIOT and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 205. Continuous 3D chaotic printing: Using the chaotic flow induced by a Kenics mixer to continuously fabricate complex micro- and/or nanostructure at high resolution. C. Chávez, M. Diaz de Leon Derby, G. Trujillo de Santiago, M. Alvarez

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Chemical Education Cosponsored by SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 206. Effect of active learning videos on organic chemistry learning. J. Su, R.R. Srinivasan CHED 207. Effective scaffolding for students’ out-of-class use of chemistry simulations. A. Shrode, B. Martinez, D.G. Herrington, R.D. Sweeder, J.R. Vandenplas CHED 208. Evaluating the health benefits of polyphenols using analytical and computational methods. S.L. Burke, A.M. Fedor CHED 209. Green analytical chemistry lab: Spectrophotometric determination of phosphate. M. Dilip, R. Lindsay CHED 210. Sizzle and fizzle: An inexpensive and accessible kinetics experiment using bath bombs. M. Cabassa, B.L. Haas CHED 211. Using bulky groups to favor the typically unfavored diastereomer in benzoin reduction: An inquirybased teaching laboratory. J. Merritt, F. Firooznia CHED 212. Bias analysis: Proficiency testing program focused on research-based learning (RBL). G. Lopez-Reyes, M. Olvera-Treviño CHED 213. Students ‘participation and teaching strategies: Developing first-year undergraduate students’ learning skills, motivation and positive affect. M. Elizondo, J. Ramirez Torres, S. Sandi-Urena CHED 214. Absolute temperature determination for general chemistry laboratory. A. Dukart, D.R. Viernes CHED 215. Team-Based Learning (TBL) in a chemistry classroom. K. Pangallo CHED 216. Does focused algebra review impact undergraduate students’ math confidence in chemistry? K. Pangallo

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Colloid & Surface Chemistry Cosponsored by COLL and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 217. Three-component coupling to create novel nanocomposites. B.P. Chauhan, G. Longia, Q. Johnson CHED 218. Development of iron oxide based nanoparticle vaccines for human papilloma virus. R.H. Vincent, A. Reilly, J.W. Dittmar, B.D. Stein, L. Bronstein CHED 219. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clustering aided by multiblock amphiphilic copolymer increases drug uptake and release. P. Price, J.W. Dittmar, B. Lawson, A.S. Voronov, A. Kohut, L. Bronstein CHED 220. Synthesis, morphological evolution and kinetic studies of rhodanine-late transition metal complexes. B.P. Chauhan, V. Musli, A. Gaba, M. Chauhan, G. Longia CHED 221. Examining interbacterial forces by atomic force microscopy. T. Liu, P. Saha, M.A. Ferguson

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Computational Chemistry Cosponsored by COMP and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 222. Determining the effects of metabolism on green tea polyphenols using computational methods. K. Grzymski, A.M. Fedor

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED 148. DNA aptamers that selectively bind to hydroxyapatite. E. Duffy, A.E. Gerdon CHED 149. Calcium phosphate supersaturation ratios alter DNA aptamer-templated mineralization in solution. J. Shlaferman, A.E. Gerdon CHED 150. Using measurements at individual nanoparticles to screen electrocatalysts for hydrazine oxidation. J. Walmsley, P. Saha, C.M. Hill CHED 151. Quantification of cinnamaldehyde in dietary supplements and cooking spices. D. Hallak, K.S. Wendling CHED 152. Determination of the refractive index of calcium nitrate measured by the extension method. J. Park, H. Kim, J.H. Shin CHED 153. Thermodynamic study of esterification of acetic acid and amyl alcohols using a microwave reactor. K. Simon, J.H. Shin CHED 154. Polyurethane elastomers in cultural heritage: Spectral analysis and database generation. M. Landis, A. Rizzo CHED 155. Determination of aluminum in commercial cake mix with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. R.J. Holthus, A.A. Bazzi, J.A. Bazzi CHED 156. Biomolecular influence on a model lipid membrane: Raman spectral study. E. Miller, S. Braziel, J. Warner Clement, S. Lee CHED 157. Determination of lead in municipal water samples from Flint, MI, using GFAAS and ICP-MS. E.J. James, K.A. Rincon, J. Bazzi, A.A. Bazzi CHED 158. Optimization of calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the rapid classification of iron and stony-iron meteorites under ambient conditions. O.F. Wass, D. Gerrity, N.A. Swartz, O. Cohen, M. Hebert CHED 159. Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) for field archaeology. N. Allen, M.K. Donais, D. George CHED 160. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis of illuminated manuscripts. E.A. Lomuscio, M.K. Donais CHED 161. Detection, isolation, and characterization of pigments produced by soil bacteria. M. Slemmer, M. Bell, S.E. Lettini, T.P. Umile CHED 162. Quantifiying xylene mixtures by Raman spectroscopy. L. Reilly, R. Desamero, E.E. Mojica CHED 163. Raman spectroscopic analysis of nitrile containing compounds. L. Wyan, R. Desamero, E.E. Mojica CHED 164. Characterization of bee propolis from Greece. J. Farshi, E.E. Mojica CHED 165. Binding of sulfa drugs with nanoceramics (metal oxides). G. Iannone, E.E. Mojica CHED 166. Lipid profiling in K562 human leukemia cells via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. J. Gilbertson, E. Hong, A. Gaito, L. Cintron-Rivera, L. Dupree, C. Andersen, A.R. Van Dyke CHED 167. How does pesticide accumulation impact a keystone species? Quantitation of atrazine in the hepatopancreas of crayfish using QuEChERS extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. D.J. Dayfield, K.E. Yacoo, D.N. Maxwell, V.C. Torres, R.M. Belanger, E. Roberts-Kirchhoff, K.R. Evans CHED 168. Quantification of unreacted styrene in composites laminate using SPME/GC techniques. J. Habumugisha, J.R. Ford CHED 169. Specific electrical capacitance for model membrane thickness. J. Giancaspro, S. Lee

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED CHED 223. DFT study of amine group anchoring in silicon (100) surface dimers. J.E. Rojas, F. Muñoz CHED 224. Probing the mechanism of binding between the sperm and egg cell surface receptors by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. J.D. Balmforth, E.N. Laricheva

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Environmental Chemistry Cosponsored by ENVR and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 225. Selectivity in heavy metal removal from contaminated water using agrowaste. O. Olafuyi, A. Allen, O. Okeh, L.E. Agwaramgbo CHED 226. Determination of bacteria, chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen in wastewater at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYC-DEP). L. Ramirez Medrano, B. Boniecki, F. Jacques, P.D. Svoronos CHED 227. Photochemical degradation of oil products in seawater monitored by 3D excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy: Implications for colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) studies. W.J. De Bruyn, D.K. Chang, T. Bui, S. Hok, C. Clark CHED 228. Nitrogen concentration trends in Long Island Sound. L. Ramirez Medrano, P.D. Svoronos, P. Marchese CHED 229. Analysis of sulfonyl bisphenol (BPS) leaching from polycarbonate baby bottles. L. Hall, E. Ruben, S. Sullivan, B. Ware, M. Berger CHED 230. Tennessee’s Nolichucky River: Studies of enriched uranium in environmental media from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A. Awosanya, N. Bagnall, R. Jackson, J. Long, B. Rodriguez, S. Youtsey, M.E. Ketterer CHED 231. Atmospheric measurements of NO, NO2, CO2, CO, and CH4 in concentrations in the air. N. Shatirishvili, G. Jibuti, W.G. Tong

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Green Chemistry & Sustainability Cosponsored by CEI and SOCED Financially supported by GCI; I&EC Green Chemistry N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 232. Greener remediation of hexavalent chromium using cellulose films. M. Dilip, J. Levitre CHED 233. Effect of NaCl on the solid phase acid catalyzed transesterification of vegetable oil to generate fatty acid methyl esters biodiesel. W. Burnett, P.T. Bell CHED 234. Greener removal of hexavelent chromium using cellulose films. J. Levitre, M. Dilip CHED 235. Incorporating green chemistry and sustainability into the undergraduate organic teaching labs. A. Giarrosso, J.M. Garcia CHED 236. Novel synthetic methods for green organic laboratory preparations: Mechanochemical synthesis of carboxycoumarins. S.M. Bakal, S.M. Choudhry, N.E. Schmeltz, E. Vangeli, M.N. Washington, I.J. Levy CHED 237. Preliminary investigation of the qualitative and quantitative exposure of a community of college students to bisphenol A and bisphenol S. A. Berube, E.J. Brush CHED 238. Exploring the mechanochemical synthesis of metal ammine chlorides. K. Mahardy, C.K. Pham, K. Schultz, N.J. O’Neil CHED 239. Greening the Hantzsch dihydropyridine synthesis for preparation of symmetric 1,4-dihydropyridines in the undergraduate laboratory. S. Mattei, I.J. Levy

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Inorganic Chemistry Cosponsored by INOR and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 240. Deactivation of a ruthenium(II) N-heterocyclic carbene p-cymene complex during transfer hydrogenation catalysis. R.M. Kharbouch, J.R. Miecznikowski, B.Q. Mercado, M.A. Lynn, M.E. Morgan, S. Bonitatibus, N.A. Bernier, C.A. Van Akin

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CHED 241. Tris-heteroleptic ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex: synthesis, characterization, redox, and photochemical studies. J. Marold, A. Jain CHED 242. Boron and nitrogen functionalized hierarchical porous carbon for supercapacitor. A.M. Alfaraidi, T. Baroud, E.P. Giannelis CHED 243. Synthesis of oxygen-donating scorpionate ligands for use in small scale biomimetic models of sulfite oxidase. N. Fitzpatrick, M. Youmans CHED 244. Role of confinement for host-guest interactions in UiO-66. E.H. Adillon, Z. Li, T. Rayder, J.A. Byers, C. Tsung CHED 245. Synthesis and crystal structure of several M3Ga(BO3)2 hom*ologues. G. Brown, R. Smith CHED 246. Mechanistic exploration of cation-modulated catalysis through palladium pincer complexes. K.E. Gardner, A.H. Sullivan, A.J. Miller CHED 247. Nickel and ruthenium complexes of primary amido-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. T.V. Roach, M.L. Schmitz, V.A. Leach, J.H. DeMario, D.K. Vo, M.D. Miller, B.C. Chan, S.E. Kalman CHED 248. Synthesis of novel organoplatinum(IV) iodido compounds and evaluation of anticancer activity. A.M. O’Brien, M. Cogley, A. Arabi, S. Lee, W.A. Howard CHED 249. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt(II) model complexes for liver alcohol dehydrogenase. E.M. Almanza, J.R. Miecznikowski, J.P. Jasinski, M.A. Lynn, S.E. Zygmont, S. Bonitatibus, R.M. Kharbouch CHED 250. Cobalt(II) metal ion complexes of tapa with exogenous anionic ligands bound in the H-bonding pocket. N. Stumme, N. Sedore, A. Ellern, D.C. Swenson, M. Zart CHED 251. Plasma modified electrodes as a platform for immobilizing water splitting catalysts. Y.M. Badiei, R. Rosales, C. Traba, C. Vera CHED 252. Unique crystalline composite displaying four primary zoning events in the solid state and based upon self-assembled, helical coordination polymers. A. Zamurd, K. Godwin, A. Partelow, S. Seidel CHED 253. Preparation and acidolysis reactions of rhenium(I) complexes supported by three carbonyl ligands, an α-diimine ligand, and an alkylcarbonate ligand. K. Chen, E. Tumbaco, C. Patel, D. Santo, A. Naeem, E. Ball, D. Naik, G.A. Moehring CHED 254. Covalent metal-organic networks (CMONs): 1D, 2D, and 3D solids synthesized through protecting group methods. D. Pham, A. Kreider-Mueller, D.R. Manke CHED 255. Cancer selective ruthenium pro-drugs have been studied to show that pH can influence the distribution coefficient and uptake. S. Altman, F. Qu, J. Gray, E.T. Papish CHED 256. Utilizing a molybdenum complex selenium scorpionate ligand for the study of sulfite oxidase. S. Nichols, M. Youmans

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Medicinal Chemistry Cosponsored by MEDI and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 257. Chemical synthesis of tagged analogues and development of structure activity relationships around trypanosomiasis lead drug CBL0137. B.D. Greene, E. Burchfield, K.A. Bachovchin, A. Spaulding, P. Guyett, A. Sharma, A. Purmal, B. Singh, K. Mensa-Wilmot, M.P. Pollastri CHED 258. Effect of an in vitro human digestion on the major cannabinoids present in commercially available cannabis oils. A.M. Gonzalez Pineiro, E.D. Reyes CHED 259. Using the Maquette technology to develop novel genetically-encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs). X. Yu, M. Iwanicki, B.M. Discher CHED 260. Synthesis of derivations from repurposed drug leads to find a new treatment for human African trypanosomiasis. R. Dalton, T. DeLano, R. Diaz, J.K. Fisher, E. Mavrogiannaki, G. Ceballos, M. Navarro, M.P. Pollastri CHED 261. Synthesis and biological evaluation of analogs of a bacterial secondary metabolite for antagonism of quorum sensing phenotypes. A. Mozzer, S.M. Meschwitz CHED 262. Synthesis and biological evaluation of phevalin and related pyrazinones as potential quorum sensing inhibitors. N. Martin, S.M. Meschwitz CHED 263. Co-crystallization of levothyroxine with over-thecounter medication. G. Alothman, M. Bader CHED 264. Biophysical studies of G-quadruplex DNA in complexes with small molecule ligands. A. Yett, S.T. Nyovanie, L.A. Yatsunyk

CHED 265. Design, synthesis, evaluation, and SAR development of novel small-molecule inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. J. Powers, T. Lepley, M. Warnock, D.A. Lawrence, C.D. Emal CHED 266. Extraction of curcuminoids from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa via low-temperature soxhlet extraction using polar protic and polar aprotic solvents. E.O. Wade, G. Aguilar CHED 267. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on breast cancer cell migration. I. Velasquez, R. Sullivan, T. Hemraj-Benny, S. Dehipawala CHED 268. Design and synthesis of anti-inflammatory drug derivatives for potential CNS delivery. A.J. Rice, B. Eden, W. Bowman, T. Lovett, E. Geissler, S.C. Young CHED 269. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of cationic sophorolipid derivatives. A. Martin, S. Mekala, A. Yaksic CHED 270. In silico design of aptamers targeted to β-amyloid proteins 40 and 42: An application for Alzheimer’s disease. F.A. González, C.A. Arango, Á. Barrera Ocampo

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Nanochemistry Cosponsored by SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 271. Towards carbon based nanotechnology: Vertical translocation of potassium cations through a three-dimensional graphene pillar. J. Almeida, A. Rodriguez, G. Blanco, S. Munoz CHED 272. Supramolecular metallofurene atoms: HartreeFock 3-21G quantum chemical analysis of endohedral guest alkali and alkaline-earth metals within a Buckyball host. C. Luque, T. Quintero, H. Suchinsky, S. Munoz CHED 273. Optimizing coagulation conditions for boron nitride nanotube cryogels. L. Quinn, S. Williams, D. Marincel, M. Pasquali CHED 274. Undecylenic acid-based nanocarriers for resveratrol chemotherapy. B. Battaglia, R. Foreman, D. Sodders, T. Vu, C.E. Larrabee CHED 275. Microwave synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles in the presence of polyaniline nanofibers. K. Kim, D.M. Sarno CHED 276. Non-hydrolytic synthesis of bile salt encapsulated ferrite nanoparticles. M. Johnson, V. White, P. Blount, T.M. Trad CHED 277. Triphenylphosphine-modified gold nanoparticles as potential chemo- and thermo-therapeutic agent. Y. Dho, F. Benyettou, A. Trabolsi CHED 278. Ionic liquid-single-walled carbon nanotube based electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells. R.A. Sumner, T. Hemraj-Benny, S.I. Lall-Ramnarine, J.F. Wishart CHED 279. Imidazole as a novel and robust gold binding group at STM-BJ method. X. Yu, S. Smith, T. Fu, J. Xue, L. Venkataraman, S. Wei CHED 280. Oligocarbazole molecular wires: Synthesis and single-molecule conductance. J. Xue, X. Yu, P. Tuttle, G.M. Florio, S. Wei CHED 281. Effect of oxidation of copper sulfide on cation exchange. K. Plass, A. Unruh, B. Li CHED 282. Interaction of antibiotic-functionalized carbon nanotubes with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. J. Carver, N. McCampbell, A. Simpson, M.D. Ellison CHED 283. Enhancing magnetically separable catalysis through the assembly of presynthesized nanoparticles on Fe/ SiO2. T. Yom, M. Muzzio, S. Sun CHED 284. Photocatalytic degradation of aldrin and dieldrin by m-BiVO4/BiOBr/Pd ternary composite. J.B. McLemore, E.B. Miller, E. Zahran, M.R. Knecht, L.G. Bachas CHED 285. Studies of C60 fullerene solutions of alkanes, cycloalkanes, and vegetable oils. L.D. Bienski, J.B. Yamouni, S.J. Clark, R.M. Rusk, V. Pham CHED 286. Thin-film flat panel display based on Y2O3:Eu3+ doped with Ag nanoparticles. R.A. González León, D.M. Jiménez Martínez CHED 287. Investigating the interactions between imidazolium-based ionic liquids and single-walled carbon nanotubes. K. Urena, R.A. Sumner, M. Begliarbekov, V. Narang, J.F. Wishart, S.I. Lall-Ramnarine, T. Hemraj-Benny CHED 288. Nanoparticles for brain drug delivery: Design, synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation. M.F. Veloz-Castillo, J. Cordero-Arreola, S. Hidalgo-Tobón, O. Arias-Carrión, M.A. Mendez-Rojas

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Organic Chemistry Cosponsored by SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 290. Effects of increasing size of molecular framework on crystal recognition in naphthylamide quasiracemates. M. Parks, L. Taylor, B. Wagner, K.A. Wheeler CHED 291. Unsupervised machine learning for novel ligand design. A. Hsu, J.F. Hartwig, E.V. Anslyn CHED 292. Synthesis of fluorescent 4-amino-1,8naphthalimide derivatives. H.A. Huther, J.M. Zinser, D.E. Lewis CHED 293. Progress towards the synthesis of auxiliary molecules for stereospecific peptide ligation. E. Stevens, M.T. Peterson, B.H. Williamson CHED 294. Progress toward the total synthesis of salinazinones A and B. B. Rackley, D. Martinez-Solorio CHED 295. Stereoselective synthesis of 4-amino-3hydroxybenzopyran flavonoid derivatives from chalcones. V.P. Parise, L. Xu, Y.R. Mehta, L.N. Aldrich CHED 296. Facilitation of hydrolysis of a Ni-Schiff base using varied chelating agents. M.B. Miller, S.E. Rose, G. Lengyel CHED 297. Scalable synthesis of rooperol and analogues. Z. Schwartz, M. Jemal, D. Lee, S.M. Kerwin CHED 298. Anion-binding catalysis in enantioselective chromanone construction. O. Kohei, Y. Guan, J. Attard, J. Hatt, S. Kondo, A.E. Mattson CHED 299. Extraction and isolation of secondary metabolites which exhibit activity against gram positive bacteria from anti-fungal resistant Aspergillus i. W. Van Benschoten, S. Hein CHED 300. Synthesis and optimization of [3.2.1] bicyclic compounds as potential neuroprotective agents. G. Ghuman, S.L. Maki, E.J. St. Germain, W. Bollinger, K. Dawson-Scully, S.D. Lepore CHED 301. Regioselective migratory insertions of ynol ethers. M. McCallum, B.W. Michel, B.L. Taylor CHED 302. New reactions of cyanamides and alkynamides for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing small molecules. S.P. Mulcahy, Y. Al-Issa, K. Medas, V. Ndahayo, G. Rainone CHED 303. Synthesis of aromatic belt molecules: Applications in nanoscience. T.D. Clayton, R. Jasti CHED 304. Syntheisis of a strained vinyl silane. M. West, W.R. Winchester CHED 305. Synthesis of (+)-serantrypinone. X. Wang, D.T. Mickles, J.R. Scheerer CHED 306. Synthesis and evaluation of prebiotically plausible peptides for the RNA world hypothesis. E. Martinez Valdivia, M. Lucas, U. Muller, J. Schellinger CHED 307. Antimicrobial metabolites from Hypericum brachyphyllum. J. Williamson, B. Doscher, K. Dieng, C. Nnoruka, C. McNeely, A. Tejada, D. Williams, O.E. Christian CHED 308. Facile procedure for one-pot conversion of aldehydes and ketones into 1,3-enynes. R.R. Poveda, J. Cabezas CHED 309. Synthesis of small amide carrier molecules for the inhibition of lysyl oxidase. J. Redden, D.M. Solano CHED 310. Can the lyophilized extract from maguey roots brew be used as a dietary supplement? M.T. Morales, E.D. Reyes CHED 311. Investigation into a sequential Goldberg/ Finkelstein reaction. M.E. Carpenter, M.E. Hart CHED 312. Total synthesis and biological study of natural products. C. St. Amant, M. Patel, Y. Xing CHED 313. Molecular recognition from quasiracemic regioisomers. E.C. Vyhmeister, A.K. Brandt, K.A. Wheeler CHED 314. Preparation of L- and D-vinylglycine-based building blocks for the synthesis of medically relevant complex molecules. J. Schlosser, R. Ford, E. York, L. Sanchez CHED 315. Tuning chemoselectivity toward an affordable synthesis of aurantioclavine. C. Chew, Z. Mariani, S. Scharmach, L. Sanchez CHED 316. Molecular recognition via shape mimicry of 3-substituted diarylamides. J.P. Butler, K.A. Wheeler

CHED 317. Synthesis and properties of new fluorenofluorene-based structures. H. Hashimoto, A. Hacker, K.M. D’Ambrosio, J.E. Wood, M. Pavano, D.K. Frantz CHED 318. Synthesis of lactam derivatives of LamD, a cyclic signaling peptide of Lactobacillus plantarum. A. Cantrel, M.A. Bertucci CHED 319. Stereoselective synthesis of amino acids. J.K. Harrison, T.R. Ryder CHED 320. New approach to polycyclic 2-pyridone alkaloids through a Diels-Alder/retro-Diels-Alder cycloaddition. N. Angello, R. Wiley, J.R. Scheerer CHED 321. Extraction characterization and evaluation of a crude organic extract of the Algae Stypopodium zonale as a potential source of anxiolytic agents. N.M. RodriguezRivera, R. Chiesa, C.M. Ospina CHED 322. Synthesis and triggered degradation of aliphatic polyesters. K. Maziarz, K.E. Broaders CHED 323. Synthesis and characterization of 1-(4-(1-iminoethyl)phenyl) ethanone. J. Robbins, A.B. Waghe CHED 324. Development of a biaryl oxidative couplingbased route to the anti-tumor natural products TMC-95. C. Lynch, E. Martin, S. Burgeson, L. Sanchez CHED 325. Developing a synthetic route to caramboxin, a rare bioactive non-peptidic amino acid. E. Spendio, C. Fritschi, A. Pascucci, L. Sanchez CHED 326. Polydopamine as a material for the collection of boronic esters. E. Graham, K.E. Broaders CHED 327. Exploring the effect of fluorinated side chains in a family of sulfonamide ionic liquids. J.D. Ramdihal, C. Rodriguez, K. Papacostas, E. Fernandez, E. Castner, S.I. Lall-Ramnarine, J.F. Wishart CHED 328. Enhanced performances of hierarchical zeolites in catalytic cyclisation of citronellal. A.K. Shah, M.F. Jalbani

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Physical Chemistry Cosponsored by SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 329. Ionization constant and solubility of lidocaine. T. Haines, P.A. Brletic CHED 330. Numerical and experimental studies of the effect of electromagnetic field on calcium dynamics in a two-cell model. C. Rosa, M. Moreno, S. Kadar, S. Walker, J. Fry, M. Turner CHED 331. Exploring the effects of gold nanoparticles binding to humic acid via fluorescence quenching. H. Kline, B.D. Anderson CHED 332. Measurement of water permeability: Droplet interface bilayer as a model for cell membrane. M.J. Morales, A. Bishop, S. Lee CHED 333. Interaction of small molecules with cell membrane models studied with tensiometry. A. Gayapa, R. Warmoth, M. Iqbal, S. Lee CHED 334. Yolk-shell nanostructures of metal nanoparticles encapsulated in porous carbon spheres as catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction. C. Wahl, R. Mercado, J. Lu, S. Chen CHED 335. Measuring phylloquinone hydrogen bonding environments with FTIR spectroscopy and computational methods. A.M. Hoffnagle, S. Meloni, J.M. Anna CHED 336. Effects of cis and trans double bonds on water permeability of monoglyceride and phospholipid membranes in the presence and absence of cholesterol: Computational studies. J. Rosario, J. Anand, S. Lee, R. Versace

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Undergraduate Research Posters Polymer Chemistry Cosponsored by PMSE, POLY and SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 2:00 – 4:00 CHED 337. Undecylenic acid-based drug delivery system for acute myeloid leukemia. J. Vandegrift, E. Ogle, C.E. Larrabee CHED 338. Thio-bromo click chemistry as a tool for the preparation of ROMP-based degradable gels. L. Baeza, C.E. Hobbs CHED 339. Post-polymerization click reactions facilitated by mechanochemistry. M. Ashlin, C.E. Hobbs

CHED 340. Elucidating the co-dependence of collagen and fibronectin during fibrillogenesis. J. Paten, J. Wanis, A. Figueroa-Navedo, L. Deravi CHED 341. Solid phase organic synthesis approach to polymers based on alternating ring opening metathesis polymerization. I.H. Khan, N.S. Sampson CHED 342. Exploring hydrogen bonding of silica materials using a soluble organosilicon model compound. K. Targos, J.R. Jagannathan, A.K. Franz CHED 343. Molecular dynamics: An approach for the understanding of drug delivering systems. L.I. Gil Pineda, F.A. González, C.A. Arango, C.H. Salamanca

TRiO & Chemistry Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHED, MAC, WCC and YCC

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix D. C. Bromfield-Lee, P. L. Daubenmire, A. L. Marsh, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 15, 21, 31, 36, 53, 55-56, 61, 69, 74, 77, 120, 130-131, 136, 150, 205-206, 213, 215, 218, 220, 267, 272, 276-278, 283284, 286-287, 303, 331, 334. See previous listings. 353, 368, 393, 401-402, 404, 416, 422, 437, 439. See subsequent listings.

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Successful Student Chapters Cosponsored by SOCED N. Di Fabio, J. Roberts, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 CHED 344. University of Massachusettes Lowell student chapter: A focus on interdisciplinary and faculty cooperation to supplement the undergraduate education. J.D. Cullen, J.J. Garfield, N.J. Anderson, J.R. Walsh, M.V. Fonseca, N. Kogan CHED 345. California State University Northridge ACS Student Chapter. K. Moctar, A. Zlatkin, K. Kaiser, R. Abrol CHED 346. ACS Qatar University Chapter: Updates on the approach of Qatar University’s Chapter to empower young chemists and reach out to the community. A.A. Said, J.J. James, A. Mahmoud, I. Gunawan, A.S. Elgendy, A.A. ElSamak, N.S. Shah, M.K. Abdelrasool, S.Y. Al-Qaradawi CHED 347. Resonance of chemistry in Tecnológico de Monterrey in México. N.I. Preciado, A. Jiménez, M. Martil, A. Hurtado, A. Gonzalez, R. Espiricueta, D. Irigoyen, A. Nieto CHED 348. Saint Anselm College Chemistry Club: We have our ion chemistry. E.A. Lomuscio, J. Cohen, P. Zayka, N. Eyet CHED 349. Promoting Green Chemistry through the Outreach Programs of the Wilkes University ACS Student Chapter. N. Fitzpatrick, D. DeFazio, A. Black, H. Arcure CHED 350. Western Washington University Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society. C. Crickmore, S. Neely, S.R. Emory, E. Raymond CHED 351. Don’t reinvent the wheel: How to leverage collaborations and established demonstrations to create successful outreach endeavors. T. Wrenn, Z. Alkak, C. Parrocha, D. Lau, K. Byrd

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

General Papers General Chemistry S. A. Fleming, Organizer J. Houck, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 352. Design process for a first-year blockmode general chemistry unit. S.W. Bigger, D. Caridi, A.J. Smallridge 8:55 CHED 353. Designing and teaching a course about characterization techniques for nanotechnology and materials science in an undergraduate institution. A.H. Pinto 9:15 CHED 354. Pokemon Go learn some chemistry: Applications of augmented reality to a general chemistry active-learning course. E. Victor

121

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED 289. Chemical labeling of silica (SiO2) nanoparticles with fluorescein for neurological applications. P. Crespo, M.F. Veloz-Castillo, L.A. García-De-La-Rosa, K. Lopez-Garcia, R. Gutiérrez-Aguilar, M.A. Mendez-Rojas

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHED/CHAS 9:35 CHED 355. Experiential learning in Honors General Chemistry with free computational resources. A.K. Sharma 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 356. Chemistry around the world: Coupling an at-home lab kit with an electronic laboratory notebook. J. Houck 10:30 CHED 357. Create chemistry: Spark student engagement with digital tools. J. Houck 10:50 CHED 358. Incorporation of an iBook-based laboratory manual in general chemistry courses at Merrimack College. J.D. Blanchard, A.L. Fernandez, B. Provencher, S.M. Theberge, B. Zwickau 11:10 Intermission. 11:25 CHED 359. Teaching college organic chemistry to elementary school students: A new model for early chemistry learning. D.B. Fried 11:45 CHED 360. Implementing undergraduate research as a high-impact practice. A.E. Fischer

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

GSSPC: Frontiers in Computational Chemistry: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Experiment Cosponsored by COMP S. Fischer, K. Pellegrene, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:40 CHED 361. Recent progress on the development of advanced functional materials at IBM: Bridging the gap between theory and experiment. G.O. Jones 9:20 CHED 362. Monomeric polyglutamine structures that evolve into fibrils. D. Punihaole, R.S. Jakubek, R.J. Workman, L. Marbella, P. Campbell, J.D. Madura, S.A. Asher 10:00 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 363. Adventures with Brownian dynamics. J.A. McCammon 10:50 CHED 364. New methods and models for condensed phase simulation. T.L. Head-Gordon

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Citizens First! Using Real-World Contexts for Engaging Students in Learning Chemistry Cosponsored by CEI Financially supported by Strem Chemicals, Inc. G. Clark, P. L. Daubenmire, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 365. Integrating ethics and social responsibility of scientists into freshman undergraduate courses. M. Berger, R. Gurney, B. Gray 8:55 CHED 366. Integrating technology and social media into introductory chemistry courses to create inclusive, informed, and engaged citizenry. D. Vardar-Ulu, D. Stelter 9:15 CHED 367. Current science and science discussion: Two ways to help students connect chemistry to the world outside of the classroom. J.R. Pribyl 9:35 CHED 368. Environmental science activity cultivation project. D.B. King, C.L. Fish, K. Aubrecht 9:55 Intermission. 10:05 CHED 369. Using student-community engagement activities to integrate environmental context in a general chemistry course. A.M. Fedor 10:25 CHED 370. Full fabrication of Pb-perovskite solar cells in a general chemistry laboratory. D.A. McCurry, S. Lee, E. Fahrenkrug, M. Kolakowski, D. Panda, S. Maldonado 10:45 CHED 371. Natural products in fermented tea leaves are suitable to assay iron in pharmaceuticals. C. Saenjum, W. Wongwilai, K. Kiwfo, C.H. Bergo, K. Grudpan 11:05 CHED 372. Phosphate recovery – applied environmental technology as a relevant issue in the learning of chemistry. I. Eilks, C. Zowada, A. Siol, O. Gulacar 11:25 Concluding Remarks.

Broadening Participation in STEM: Empirical Studies & Models of Success Improving Participation through Programmatic & Curricular Efforts Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHED, MAC and WCC

Chemistry Librarians of the Future Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHED

122

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

Celebrating the Success of an Exchange Program for German & American Chemistry Students Cosponsored by IAC and YCC Financially supported by ACS Northeastern Local Section; German Chemical Society T. R. Gilbert, J. J. O’Neil, Organizers A. A. Scholte, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. Peter Dorhout, Matthias Urmann. 1:40 CHED 373. Launching and sustaining the NESACSGDCh student exchange program. M.E. Strem, T.R. Gilbert 2:10 CHED 374. Chemistry in Germany - educational and research opportunities: How to get connected and how to continue. E. Kapatsina, M. Groteklaes 2:40 CHED 375. How a 7-day exchange can make (all) the difference - a personal review. J. Breffke 3:10 Intermission. 3:20 CHED 376. Celebrating the success of an exchange program for German & American chemistry students. J.J. O’Neil, F.R. Lucci 3:30 Panel Discussion. P. Cappillino, M. Ismail, E. Lewis, E. Adaligil, C. Rawlins, G. Kim.

4:05 Discussion & Concluding Remarks.

Broadening Participation in STEM: Empirical Studies & Models of Success Improving Participation through Research & Partnerships Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by CHED, MAC and WCC

Chemistry Librarians of the Future Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHED

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

General Papers Organic

Cosponsored by COMP S. Fischer, K. Pellegrene, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 CHED 377. Surface tension and solubility vs. hydrophobicity. B.M. Pettitt 2:10 CHED 378. Heavy element chemistry and peptide fragmentation: Where experiment and theory meet. P.B. Armentrout 2:50 CHED 379. Enhanced Monte Carlo methods for proteins and computation of absolute free energies of binding. I. Cabeza de Vaca, Y. Qian, J.Z. Vilseck, J. TiradoRives, W.L. Jorgensen 3:30 Intermission. 3:40 CHED 380. Processing simulation data to produce the observables seen by experimentalists facilitates effective collaboration. W.C. Swope, V.A. Piunova, A.C. Carr 4:20 CHED 381. Dynamic regulation of signaling pathways in dopamine neurons: the intracellular actions of amphetamines. S.G. Amara 5:00 CHED 382. Molecular dynamics and organic reaction mechanisms. K.N. Houk 5:40 Concluding Remarks.

S. A. Fleming, Organizer K. R. Caldwell, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 390. Incorporation of benchtop NMR spectroscopy into undergraduate laboratories. J. Araneda, S. Riegel 8:55 CHED 391. Separation and quantification of liquid mixtures by a simple, cost-efficient GC-MS system. I.A. Beta, H.M. Gabor, B. Regel, S. Fleishner 9:15 CHED 392. Synthesis of alkylated derivatives of hydroxamic acids via a safe, rapid microwave-based procedure suitable for the undergraduate laboratory. C. Durand, T. Griffin-Blake, H. Shinsato, R.G. Aslanian 9:35 CHED 393. Chemistry in the arts: An interdisciplinary look at student-synthesized azo dyes. K.L. Yearty, C. Cortes, R.W. Morrison 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 394. Total synthesis of muscone for the advanced organic chemistry lab. B. Chandler 10:30 CHED 395. Synthesis of a naturally-occuring nitro compound by electrophilic aromatic substitution. J.M. Garcia 10:50 CHED 396. A simple method for the visualization of chair and twist-boat transition states in torsionally controlled addition reactions. A.J. Catino 11:10 Intermission. 11:25 CHED 397. A report on the implementation of organic chemistry REActivities at a four-year and a two-year institution. J.A. Cody, T.G. Goudreau Collison, J.P. Anderson, B.L. Edelbach, D. Newman, M. Jackson 11:45 CHED 398. Straightforward measures can be used to predict and enhance student performance in the one-year organic chemistry course sequence. K.R. Caldwell 12:05 CHED 399. Introduction of research into a large enrollment organic chemistry lab course. N.A. Eskew, C. Cruz

SECTION C

SECTION B

Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

Citizens First! Using Real-World Contexts for Engaging Students in Learning Chemistry

Green Chemistry Theory & Practice: Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond

Cosponsored by CEI Financially supported by Strem Chemicals, Inc. G. Clark, P. L. Daubenmire, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 383. Carbohydrates and cultural competence: Food for thought on developing labs for social change. G. Clark 1:55 CHED 384. School students assay iron with guava leaf extract combining local wisdom and green analytical methods. W. Wongwilai, K. Kiwfo, C. Saenjum, C.H. Bergo, K. Grudpan 2:15 CHED 385. Analytical chemistry students monitoring of Boston’s Muddy River and drinking water. A.E. Gerdon 2:35 CHED 386. Experimental-ludic contest: “Know the Periodic Table”, a Venezuelan experience. A. Torrealba, C.A. Urbina-Blanco 2:55 Intermission. 3:05 CHED 387. Balancing instructional and research goals in introductory chemistry and physics courses. Y. Kholod, D. Kosenkov 3:25 CHED 388. Chemistry + charisms: Linking lessons from introductory chemistry to the world beyond the classroom. B.L. Haas 3:45 CHED 389. Learning through eating: Students design a low carbon-footprint menu item. C.H. Middlecamp, T. Bryan

Cosponsored by CEI Financially supported by GCI; I&EC Green Chemistry J. E. Wissinger, Organizer E. J. Brush, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 400. Green microwave nano synthesis in undergraduate teaching labs. G. Dusharm 8:55 CHED 401. Low-cost experiment material for teaching of chemistry: A worthy alternative to regular laboratory material? L. Boegge, A. Lühken 9:15 CHED 402. A recyclable sol-gel catalyzed approach: Efficient one pot synthesis of α,α di-halogenated hetones. J.B. Domena, C. Chong, Y. Xing, B.P. Chauhan, Q.R. Johnson, G.K. Longia 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 CHED 403. Bismuth subsalicylate as a green catalyst for ROTEP polymerizations in the teaching lab. J.E. Wissinger, A.M. Luke, R. Bartz, D. Batiste 10:10 CHED 404. Tiny solutions for big problems: Development of a nanomaterials course for high school students focused on environmental concerns. M. Muzzio 10:30 CHED 405. Integrating green chemistry and chemical hazard awareness into organic chemistry lab curriculum. D. Ward, A.S. Cannon 10:50 Intermission.

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

GSSPC: Frontiers in Computational Chemistry: Bridging the Gap Between Theory & Experiment

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Facilitating Student Success in General Chemistry I Laboratory G. A. Brown Wright, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 408. General chemistry laboratory in the quarter format. E.L. Lebeau 8:55 CHED 409. Laboratory project: An activity to build critical thinking and problem-solving skills in general chemistry students. S. Toribio, S.J. Glinias, K.E. Kristian 9:15 CHED 410. Scaffold approach to teaching laboratory and writing skills in introductory chemistry courses. K.C. Murphy, J.G. Quattrucci, M. Dilip 9:35 CHED 411. Integrating authentic research, peer learning, and high-impact project work into the general chemistry laboratory. D.R. Brodeur, D. Heilman, U. Kumar 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 412. Designing integrated biology, chemistry, and engineering CURE and guided inquiry laboratory exercises for the general chemistry curriculum. D.E. Felton, P.L. Hartzell, M.M. Ederer, J. Moberly, K.V. Waynant 10:30 CHED 413. Exploring molecular origin of color through engaging introductory chemistry laboratory activities. L. Wang 10:50 CHED 414. Student perspectives on the helpfulness of resources provided for writing a formal general chemistry laboratory report. G.A. Brown Wright 11:10 Concluding Remarks.

Henkel Award for Outstanding Graduate Research in Polymer Chemistry: Symposium in honor of Aleksandr V. Zhukhovitskiy Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by CHED‡, POLY‡ and PROF

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 1A/1B

Research in Chemistry Education Financially supported by ACS DivCHED Committee on Chemistry Education Research H. Sevian, J. P. Walker, Organizers, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 415. Students’ perceptions towards inquirybased general chemistry laboratory activities: A five-year study. M. Shahu, S.E. Ingram, S. Synnott, L. Winchester, Y. Tong 2:15 CHED 416. Identifying and studying some of the students’ misconceptions in Organic Chemistry. I. Salame 2:35 Intermission. 2:45 CHED 417. Metacognition in chemical education: Theory and practice. R. Lavi, G. Shwartz, Y. Dori 3:05 CHED 418. The Metacognitive Exam Tool to Help You Learn (METHYL) project for sophom*ore organic chemistry. S. Chamberland, M. Wathen, T. Morris 3:25 CHED 419. Why do chemists and chemical engineers choose these professions. Y.J. Dori, O. Shav-Artza 3:45 Intermission. 3:55 CHED 420. Chemistry teachers’ intentions and students’ epistemic agency in communicative patterns in the classroom. H. Sevian, O. Aguiar 4:15 CHED 421. Understanding authorship in undergraduate research partnerships. L. Abbott, A. Andes, A. Pattani, P.A. Mabrouk 4:35 CHED 422. Undergraduate students’ goals and achievement strategies for laboratory work: A quantitative study. S. Santos-Diaz, S. Hensiek, T. Owings, M.H. Towns 4:55 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Seaport World Trade Center Waterfront Ballroom 3

Green Chemistry Theory & Practice: Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond Cosponsored by CEI and IAC Financially supported by GCI; I&EC Green Chemistry E. J. Brush, Organizer J. E. Wissinger, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 423. UN sustainable development goals for the chemistry enterprise: Challenges and opportunities. E.J. Brush 1:55 CHED 424. Towards meeting the UN sustainability goals through green chemistry. N. Hawkins 2:35 Discussion. 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 CHED 425. An international perspective on incorporating sustainability education into science education during the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. G.M. Bodner 3:30 CHED 426. A campus sustainability undergraduate research program for chemistry students. J.E. Kenny, A. Rappaport, P. Milne, J. Ng 3:50 CHED 427. 15 years of green: The green chemistry curriculum at Worcester State University. M. Dilip, K.C. Murphy, J. Nichols, M. Kerr 4:10 CHED 428. Consumer choices and the environmental effects. K.C. Murphy, J.G. Quattrucci, M. Dilip, J.R. Andreatta, S. Mitroka 4:30 Discussion.

SECTION C Seaport World Trade Center Cambridge 1/2

Alternate Assessment Methods M. C. Koether, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHED 429. Specifications grading in organic chemistry: Three years of student feedback. J.R. Ring 1:55 CHED 430. Organic chemistry lecture and laboratory with specification grading. J. Houseknecht 2:15 CHED 431. Comparison of specifications grading techniques at two different institutions and two different courses. Comparing organic chemistry and general chemistry. W. Hollinsed 2:35 CHED 432. Specifications grading in second semester general chemistry: Results of multiple attempts of quizzes throughout the semester. M.C. Koether 2:55 Intermission. 3:10 CHED 433. Resurrection points: A look at serval decades of using a grading system to encourage students to learn material and not worry about points. J.R. Pribyl, M. Hadley 3:30 CHED 434. Using an oral exam to enhance student learning and communication skills in an undergraduate instrumental analysis course. K.S. Wendling 3:50 CHED 435. An application of ChemAxon’s platform for education. A.D. Costache, E. Biró, E. Hoffmann, P. Szakács 4:10 CHED 436. Alternate assessments: On-line discussion boards in the sciences. M.C. Koether

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom C

General Papers Lab Oriented Issues S. A. Fleming, Organizer S. K. Hurst, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 CHED 437. A highly interdisciplinary cyclodextrinMOF experiment for the senior undergraduate chemistry laboratory. M. Levine, D.R. Jones, T. Mako 8:55 CHED 438. Symmetry and spectroscopy of paper models of fullerenes C60-C84 and Johnson solids. S.K. Hurst 9:15 CHED 439. Redeveloping chemistry laboratory exercises to bring state-of-the-art novel chemistry and mass spectrometry into the teaching laboratory. P.W. Fedick, R.M. Bain, K. Bain, R. Schrader, T. Mehari, C. Pulliam, S.T. Ayrton, R.G. Cooks 9:35 CHED 440. Teaching chemistry to an elementary school student, what works and what does not. A.S. Bayden 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 CHED 441. Role-playing to replace the traditional laboratory experiment. N. O’Connor, K. Mahmud

10:30 CHED 442. From the source: Student-centered guest lecturing in a chemical crystallography class. S. Zheng, Y. Chen, X. Wang, C. Hoffmann, A. Volkov 10:50 CHED 443. Community college outreach through crystallographic research. D.R. Manke 11:10 CHED 444. Using crystal structure data to introduce bioinorganic chemistry in a foundational inorganic chemistry course. A.L. Fernandez 11:30 Intermission. 11:45 CHED 445. Fluorescent universal pH indicator synthesized by students: A multi-level educational tool. M. Morgan, G. Ferguson 12:05 CHED 446. The kinetics of the cis-to-trans thermal isomerization of disperse orange: A simple undergraduate experiment for the physical chemistry lab. F. Bou-Abdallah 12:25 CHED 447. Development modifiable laboratory experiments for ligand screening of proteins using differential scanning fluorimetry. P.N. Brady 12:45 CHED 448. Petrochemical incorporation to grow material and characterization curricula: A new attempt to serve dual educational functions. M. Jiang

CHAS

Division of Chemical Health and Safety D. Decker and J. Pickel, Program Chairs

SUNDAY MORNING Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Ask Dr. Safety: Safety Considerations in the Cannabis Industry Cosponsored by CCS‡ H. J. Elston, N. R. Langerman, Organizers, Presiding 3:30 Introductory Remarks. 3:35 CHAS 1. Cannabis Chemistry Subdivision - Promoting public safety through sensible science. A. Pham 4:00 CHAS 2. Anecdotal cannabis: Stories from the road. L. Pelger 4:25 CHAS 3. Ask Dr. Safety: Chemical and occupational safety in the cannabis industry. H.J. Elston, N.R. Langerman

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by CHAS and TOXI

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production Cosponsored by AGFD N. Arora, B. J. Greene, J. Marcu, J. Payack, Organizers E. M. Pryor, Organizer, Presiding B. Greene, A. Pham, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CHAS 4. Complicating what is simple vs. simplifying what is complex: The two camps in cannabis safety. M. Lewis 8:30 CHAS 5. Bridging the cannabis safety gap: The need for an institute on cannabis for mental health and well-being. J. Roberts, J. Marcu, M. Wolfe 8:55 CHAS 6. Cannabis extraction and laboratory safety. J. Marcu, E.M. Pryor

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11:05 CHED 406. A progress report on a roadmap for green chemistry education. J. MacKellar, D.J. Constable, M.M. Kirchhoff 11:25 CHED 407. Green chemistry ACS-CPT supplement: Preparing students to meet the grand challenges of sustainability. K. Aubrecht, M. Bourgeois, E.J. Brush, J. MacKellar, J.E. Wissinger 11:45 Discussion.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHAS/CINF 9:20 CHAS 7. The role of laboratories in ensuring safe and effective cannabis for consumers. J. Churchill, E.M. Pryor 9:45 CHAS 8. Heavy metal contaminants in cannabis: Regulation to remediation. C.J. Hudalla 10:10 Intermission. 10:20 CHAS 9. Alteratives to address cannabis intoxication in the workplace and clinical trials. J. Marcu, R.W. Phifer 10:45 CHAS 10. Testing cannabis in Massachusetts: Effects of sampling and testing methodology on a budding industry. B. Cassidy, E.M. Pryor 11:10 CHAS 11. Cannabis: The EXIT drug. U. Dhanabalan, E.M. Pryor 11:35 CHAS 12. Further evidence of the utility of cannabis as a substitute for opioids in pain management. E.M. Pryor

9:00 Introductory Remarks. 9:05 CHAS 26. Enhancing the culture of safety through good storytelling. M.B. Koza 9:30 CHAS 27. How personal stories can support safety training. D.M. Decker 9:55 CHAS 28. What’s the point of your story? K.P. Fivizzani 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 CHAS 29. Urban legends, fairytales and documentaries: Effective storytelling for safety education. H. Weizman 11:00 CHAS 30. Playing with fire. S.B. Sigmann 11:25 CHAS 31. An unknowing, unthinking, uncaring graduate student learns a lesson about safety. R.H. Hill

Reducing Uncertainty in Modeling the Environmental & Human Health Exposure to Agrochemicals

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by CHAS and ENVR

SECTION A

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

SECTION A

Learning Laboratory Safety through Storytelling

Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Cosponsored by CCS S. B. Sigmann, Organizer R. Stuart, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHAS 32. The genres of scientific storytelling. R. Stuart 2:00 CHAS 33. Turning safety observations into messages. T.C. Gallagher, R. Brian, R. Stuart 2:25 CHAS 34. From storytelling to storymaking. R.M. Izzo 2:50 CHAS 35. Preserving Institutional History of Chemical Incidents. P.A. Reinhardt 3:15 Intermission. 3:30 CHAS 36. Using risk management techniques to improve situational awareness and accident reduction. R. Lippman 3:55 CHAS 37. Chemical safety information in PubChem. J. Zhang, P. Thiessen, A. Gindulyte, E. Bolton 4:20 CHAS 38. Using the chemical inventory system to create research articles that include safety information. R.N. Vernon, K.N. Lamb

Nanomaterials: Applications, Safety Considerations, & Implications for Human Health & the Environment Cosponsored by CCS‡ and I&EC D. M. Decker, J. M. Pickel, Organizers 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 CHAS 13. Role of the National Nanotechnology Initiative in the Safe and Responsible Development of Nanotechnology. M.A. Meador 1:30 CHAS 14. Nanotechnology: Where is it Today and is EHS a Part of Successful Commercialization. C.L. Geraci 1:55 CHAS 15. Back from the future: What nanotechnology can teach us about chemical safety today. K.M. Kulinowski

SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

CHAS Awards Symposium Cosponsored by CCS D. B. Walters, Organizer 2:30 Introductory Remarks. 2:35 CHAS 16. Looking forward: Fifty years experience in chemical safety. N.R. Langerman 3:00 CHAS 17. Zooming out: The future of chemicalresearch health and safety through a wide-angle lens. K.J. Brown 3:25 CHAS 18. Innovation transforming lives through the power of clean water. D.G. Schmidt 3:50 CHAS 19. Yale’s Safety Advisor Model for Supporting and Integrating Safety into Research. P.A. Reinhardt 4:15 CHAS 20. Fostering a culture of safety at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. C.R. Brennan, N.A. Eskew 4:40 CHAS 21. Dow Lab Safety Academy: Lessons learned & future opportunities. L. Seiler

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix D. M. Decker, J. M. Pickel, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 CHAS 22. Programmatic method for classifying chemicals according to California fire code. K.N. Lamb, R.N. Vernon CHAS 23. Chemical safety for laboratory animal handlers. C.R. Brennan CHAS 24. The development of a high pressure hydrogen gas generator as a replacement for hydrogen cylinders in the chemistry laboratory. R.V. Jones, F. Darvas CHAS 25. Division of Chemical Health and Safety information poster. J.M. Pickel

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Learning Laboratory Safety through Storytelling Cosponsored by CCS‡ R. Stuart, Organizer S. B. Sigmann, Organizer, Presiding

124

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production Cosponsored by AGFD N. Arora, B. J. Greene, J. Marcu, J. Payack, E. M. Pryor, Organizers K. Boyar, B. Greene, A. Pham, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 CHAS 39. The role of innovative technologies in protecting cannabis consumer safety. J. Appen, J. Siegel 8:30 CHAS 40. Latest advances in cannabis production processes. M. Roggen 8:55 CHAS 41. From cannabinoids and terpenes to medicine and open data. N. Arora 9:20 CHAS 42. Exploring innovations in third party support of regulatory compliance and chemical safety in cannabis laboratories. E.M. Pryor, J. Marcu, A. Martinez 9:45 Intermission. 10:00 CHAS 43. Extraction and purification of researchgrade cannabinoids with supercritical CO2. N. Mortillaro 10:25 CHAS 44. The DRUID app to measure drug-induced impairment. M. Milburn, E.M. Pryor 10:50 CHAS 45. Medical cannabis pharmacogenomics. T. Parr, J. Marcu 11:15 CHAS 46. New Perspectives on Cannabis and the Endocannabinoids. A. Makriyannis, E.M. Pryor 11:50 Concluding Remarks.

1:30 Introductory Remarks. 1:35 CHAS 47. THC and its metabolites in blood: Public safety, regulatory, and scientific challenges in the context of cannabis DUI. A. Pham 2:05 CHAS 48. Innovations in cannabis potency testing for the non-expert. J. Payack, M. Diaz, E.M. Pryor 2:35 CHAS 49. Terpene chemistry and thermal byproducts. R.M. Strongin, J. Meehan-Atrash 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 CHAS 50. Terpene therapy. R.D. Zaklin 3:50 CHAS 51. Analytical SFC applications for the cannabis industry. J.P. Preston, S. Sadjadi 4:20 CHAS 52. Functionally high: Innovations in the pharmacological foundations of cannabis chemovars. E.B. Russo, M. Lewis, K. Smith 4:50 Concluding Remarks.

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR

CINF

Division of Chemical Information R. Bienstock, Program Chair SOCIAL EVENTS: Reception & Poster Session, 6:30 PM: Sun Luncheon, 12:00 PM: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS: Committee Meetings, 12:30 PM: Sat

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Chemoinformatic Approaches to Enhance Drug Discovery Based on Natural Products J. L. Medina-Franco,Organizer, Presiding N. Sánchez-Cruz,Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:35CINF 1.Exploiting PubChem for drug discovery based on natural products. S. Kim, E. Bolton 9:00CINF 2.Connecting traditional with evidence-based medicine. T. Polgar 9:25CINF 3.Development of a “drug-like” natural product library from the East African flora. C. Simoben,F. Ntie-Kang, W. Sippl 9:50Intermission. 10:05CINF 4.Development of an innovative database to uncover chemical and biological information from Brazilian biodiversity. A.D. Andricopulo, M. Valli, A. Pilon, I. CastroGamboa, A. Dametto, M. Pinto, R. Freire, V.D. Bolzani 10:30CINF 5.Search of biased mu-opioid receptor ligands from nature. A. Madariaga, A.F. Marmolejo, K. Martinez Mayorga 10:55CINF 6.Predicting blood-brain barrier permeability of marine-derived kinase inhibitors. F. Plisson, A.M. Piggott, N. Hamilton, R.J. Capon 11:20CINF 7.Template-free 3D structure generation and conformer search: Complex natural products and macrocycles. A.N. Jain, A.E. Cleves

SECTION B

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

SECTION A

Reporting & Reproducibility of Chemistry Research Data

Seaport Boston Hotel Seaport Ballroom A

Cannabis Nanotechnology, Genetics & Innovative Trends in Cannabis Production Cosponsored by AGFD N. Arora, B. J. Greene, J. Marcu, J. Payack, E. M. Pryor, Organizers J. Bramante, B. Greene, A. Pham, Presiding

Cosponsored by ETHX and ORGN Financially supported by Chemical Structure Association Trust; IUPAC Committee on Publications and Cheminformatics Data Standards (CPCDS) M. G. Hicks, H. A. Lawlor, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks.

SECTION C Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom III

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information Cosponsored by CHAL and CPRM R. J. Bienstock,Organizer E. N. Cheeseman, M. McBride, E. S. Simmons,Organizers, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:45CINF 15.Chemical structure searching for patents through the years. E.S. Simmons 9:15CINF 16.Same structure, different answers: Examining the impact of chemical indexing policy on retrieval of patent references. S.R. Adams 9:45CINF 17.Beyond the search: Deep analysis of chemical patents and Markush claims. J. Biagi, Á. Figyelmesi 10:15Intermission. 10:30CINF 18.State of chemical structure searching 30 years on OR The human element – the power behind structure searching in the CAS content collection. E.N. Cheeseman 11:00CINF 19.Chemical indexing and searching with Orbit Chemistry modules. A. Kandi-Masakidi 11:30CINF 20.Chemistry in patents: Unique perspectives within Derwent World Patents Index. S. Hajkowski

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Chemoinformatic Approaches to Enhance Drug Discovery Based on Natural Products J. L. Medina-Franco,Organizer, Presiding N. Sánchez-Cruz,Presiding 1:30CINF 21.Natural product databases: Chemical space, diversity and suitability of virtual screening. F. Saldivar, J. Medina Franco 1:55CINF 22.Characterization of the chemical space of purchasable natural products. Y. Chen, C. de Bruyn Kops, M. Garcia de Lomana, N. Friedrich,J. Kirchmair 2:20CINF 23.Exploring natural product analogs in chemical universe databases. M. Awale, J. Reymond 2:45Intermission. 3:00CINF 24.OpenZika: Discovery of new antiviral candidates against Zika virus. M. Mottin, A.S. Carvalho, C.C. Melo-Filho, B.J. Neves, R.C. Braga, C.S. Lima, S. da Silva, J.F. Shimizu, N.C. Mesquita, L.O. Regasini, A.C. Jardim, E. Muratov, G. Oliva, A.L. Perryman, S. Ekins, C.H. Andrade 3:25CINF 25.Designing synthetically accessible naturalproduct mimetics by machine learning. G. Schneider, L. Friedrich, F. Grisoni, D. Merk 3:50CINF 26.Similarity search and pharmacophore modeling approaches to aid natural products drug discovery against tropical infectious diseases. E. Pavadai, G. Kaur, P. Mutai, K. Chibale 4:15CINF 27.Identification of bichalcones as natural product sirtuin inhibitors by virtual screening andin vitrotesting. B. Karaman, Z. Alhalabi, S. Swyter, S. Mihigo, K. Andrae-Marobela, M. Jung, W. Sippl,F. Ntie-Kang 4:40Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B

Reporting & Reproducibility of Chemistry Research Data Cosponsored by ETHX and ORGN Financially supported by Chemical Structure Association Trust; IUPAC Committee on Publications and Cheminformatics Data Standards (CPCDS) M. G. Hicks, H. A. Lawlor, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 28.Assessing the quality of scientific data. J. Rumble 2:00CINF 29.Scope of ELNs and repositories to improve scientific documentation and reporting: Examples taken from the Chemotion-ELN and Chemotion-Repository. N. Jung, P. Tremouilhac, S. Braese 2:25CINF 30.Bottom-up training in reproducible research: Undergraduate level approaches. A.C. Evans 2:50Intermission. 3:05CINF 31.Reproducibility in organic syntheses. R.L. Danheiser 3:30CINF 32.Progress in delivering transparency in research data by the National Center for Computational Toxicology at the US EPA. A.J. Williams, J. Edwards, C. Grulke, J. Cowden 3:55CINF 33.Better reporting for better measurements: Enzyme kinetics as a case study. W. Stroberg,S. Schnell 4:20CINF 34.Networking chemically capable robots using Twitter for RealTimeChem. L. Cronin, D. Caramelli, D. Salley 4:45Discussion.

SECTION C

CINF 47.Leveraging IUPAC recommendations for the ontological description of PubChem Data. K. Skinner, J. Rotne, S. Bagdadi, S.J. Chalk CINF 48.Text mining the IUPAC recommendations: Opportunities for knowledge discovery. J. Rotne, S.J. Chalk CINF 49.Symmetry and chirality analysis of substituted ferrocenes. A.W. Kaspi-Kaneti, I. Tuvi-Arad CINF 50.Cheminformatics-based differential modeling of dynamic ERK1/2-inhibitor interactions. J. Ash, J. HughesOliver, D. Fourches CINF 51.Data integration and fragment analysis reveal important structural motifs for ligand selectivity among hepatic organic anion transporting polypeptides. A. Türkova,B. Zdrazil CINF 52.Development of a taxonomy and indexing policy for InChI open education resources and publications. V.F. Scalfani,R.E. Belford CINF 53.Supporting the assessment of the purging of potential mutagenic impurities via analysis of known reactions. S.J. Webb, M. Burns, E. Rosser CINF 54.SynJet: A novel chemical dispensing platform for high throughput reaction screening and optimization. J.D. White, J.P. Malerich, S. Mallya, D. Stout, B. McCoy, D. Krieger, N. Collins

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Ethics of Data Sharing

Cosponsored by CHAL and CPRM R. J. Bienstock,Organizer E. N. Cheeseman, M. McBride, E. S. Simmons,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:45CINF 35.Structure searching for patent information: The need for speed. J. Mayfield, N.M. O’Boyle, R.A. Sayle 2:15CINF 36.Pros and cons of 22 million patent-extracted structures in PubChem. C. Southan 2:45CINF 37.Automating chemical structure and inhibition data extraction from patents: A text mining approach. A. Hinton 3:15Intermission. 3:30CINF 38.Searching for patent information in PubChem. S. Kim, P. Thiessen, A. Gindulyte, E. Bolton 4:00CINF 39.Navigating around patented routes with the help of computer-driven retrosynthetic analysis. K. Molga, P. Dittwald, B. Grzybowski 4:30CINF 40.Software for presenting results of chemical structure searches. J.A. Willmore

Cosponsored by ETHX‡ J. N. Currano, P. A. Mabrouk,Organizers, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:35CINF 55.Research integrity: Perspectives from the NSF Office of Inspector General. J. Kroll 9:00CINF 56.Connecting the dots between data management and research integrity. S. Moore 9:25CINF 57.Long term viability of computational chemistry/biology research. K.M. Merz 9:50CINF 58.Social aspects of chemical safety information. L.R. McEwen,R. Stuart 10:15Intermission. 10:25CINF 59.Computational analysis of publications’ texts for bioassay protocol classification. O. Tarasova, I.S. Mayorov, D. Filimonov, V. Poroikov, I. Mayzus, A. Rzhetsky 10:50CINF 60.Data sharing: Ethics in research. K.M. Elkins 11:15CINF 61.Crystallographic crime: Detection and prevention of fake data. A. Sarjeant, I. Bruno 11:40CINF 62.Chemistry data: Distortion and dissemination in the internet era. A.J. Williams 12:05Discussion. 12:25Concluding Remarks.

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward

SECTION B

Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Publishing Chemical Data

Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom III

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Galleria

CINF Poster Session E. Alvaro, S. J. Chalk,Organizers 6:30 – 8:30 CINF 41.Easy exploration of synthetically accessible chemical space via synthesis-aware enumeration. I. TubertBrohman, K.D. Konze, S. Bhat, S. Watts CINF 42.Computational approach towards understanding genotoxic and mutagenic biological pathways of azo dyes within organisms. R.J. Bienstock, L. Perera, M.A. Pasquinelli CINF 43.From just in case to just in time – just maybe not. P. Borrego, K. Zdepski CINF 44.Data visualization and analysis of the NIST TRC ThermoML Dataset. S. Bagdadi, K. Skinner, S.J. Chalk CINF 45.Combined computational chemistry and machine learning approach to assess the drug-likeness of fullerene nanostructures. B. Rasulev, N. Fjorodova CINF 46.Outlook on the development of antidiabetic compounds: Databases, scaffolds and current trends. A. Madariaga, K. Martinez Mayorga

Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis Cosponsored by ETHX and ORGN Financially supported by Chemical Structure Association Trust, IUPAC Committee on Publications and Cheminformatics Data Standards (CPCDS) M. G. Hicks, H. A. Lawlor, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:35CINF 63.Publication of raw and curated NMR spectroscopic data for organic molecules. C. Steinbeck 9:00CINF 64.Publishing spectral data in the cloud. G.M. Banik, K. Kunitsky, M. D’Souza, T. Abshear 9:25CINF 65.Flow of experimental thermophysical and thermochemical data through the NIST Thermodynamics Research Center. D. Riccardi, A. Kazakov, S. Townsend, V. Diky, C. Muzny, K. Kroenlein 9:50CINF 66.Web Force-Field (WebFF) Project: Molecular dynamics force-field repository for soft materials at multiple levels of granularity. F.R. Phelan, H. Sun 10:15Intermission. 10:30CINF 67.Reciprocal journal-to-chemistry connectivity in PubChem from the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology and other sources. C. Southan, J.L. Sharman, E. Faccenda, A.J. Pawson, S.D. Harding, J.A. Davies 10:55CINF 68.Open data in chemistry: The fast track to scientific content. J. Eiblmaier, D. Geppert, H. Saller

Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

125

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

8:35CINF 8.The internet of molecules. S. Boyer 9:00CINF 9.Reaction networks analysis for algorithmic process development. A. Lapkin, P. Jacob 9:25CINF 10.International chemical identifier for reactions (RInChI): The key to managing reaction databases effectively. J.M. Goodman, G. Blanke, G. Grethe, H. Kraut 9:50CINF 11.De factostandard or a free-for-all? A benchmark for reading SMILES. N. O’Boyle, J. Mayfield, R.A. Sayle 10:15Intermission. 10:30CINF 12.Reporting crystal structure data: Recent insights. C. Tovee, S. Ward, A. Sarjeant, I. Bruno 10:55CINF 13.Extending machine learning capabilities for semi-automated annotation of biological assays in BioAssay Express. P. Gedeck, H. McGinty, B.A. Bunin, A. Clark 11:20CINF 14.Blockchain for research. J. van Rossum 11:45Discussion.

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CINF/TOXI 11:20CINF 69.Research data management using FAIR data repository with integrated machine learning. V. Tkachenko, B. Sattarov, A. Korotcov, R. Zakharov 11:45CINF 70.SynOne - The use of an expert-defined chemical-compound class taxonomy to map organic synthesis articles from the chemistry literature. F. Shortt de Hernandez, T. Menke, J. Rochlitz

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students

R. J. Bienstock,Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 41-48,50-54. See previous listings.

Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

TUESDAY MORNING

MONDAY AFTERNOON

Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Where are the Standards: Biologics Registration & HELM Representation of Biologics: Informatics Standards & Challenges C. Bellamy, E. Bolton, D. Deng,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 71.HELM: Continuing to set the standard for biomolecular representation. S. Rotstein 2:00CINF 72.Current development and new challenges of HELM representation. D. Deng, T. Yuan, J. Lee, R. Hotchandani 2:25CINF 73.Registering chemically modified oligonucleotides: Implementations and challenges. Y. Potier 2:50Intermission. 3:00CINF 74.Similarity analysis of oligonucleotides based on HELM notation. M. Weisser 3:25CINF 75.monomer.org: The global hub for (bio) polymer informatics. D.J. Milton 3:50CINF 76.Trials and tribulations of curating peptide and antibody ligands for the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology. C. Southan, J.L. Sharman, E. Faccenda, A.J. Pawson, S.D. Harding, J.A. Davies 4:15Intermission. 4:25CINF 77.Building a bridge between human-readable and machine-readable representations of biopolymers. N. O’Boyle, R.A. Sayle 4:50CINF 78.Bridging the gap between small molecule and biologics editing: Drawing, viewing and sharing complex biomolecules with BioEddie and BiomoleculeToolkit. A.D. Costache, R. Knispel 5:15Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Publishing Chemical Data Cosponsored by ETHX and ORGN Financially supported by Chemical Structure Association Trust, IUPAC Committee on Publications and Cheminformatics Data Standards (CPCDS) M. G. Hicks, H. A. Lawlor, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 79.Publishing chemical data in public data repository. J. Zhang, P. Thiessen, A. Gindulyte, E. Bolton 2:00CINF 80.ChEMBL – encouraging deposition of drug discovery data. A. Gaulton, P. Bento, J. Chambers, E. Felix, A. Hersey, D. Mendez, J.F. Mosquera, P. Mutowo, M. Nowotka, A. Leach 2:25CINF 81.Data sharing and publication at NIST. R.J. Hanisch 2:50CINF 82.Publishing chemical data sustainably: A crystallographic case study. I. Bruno, A. Sarjeant 3:15CINF 83.Documenting chemical data. P. Linstrom 3:40Intermission. 3:55CINF 84.Profiling common types of data in chemistry research articles: What has changed in five years? Y. Li 4:20CINF 85.Publication data standards and Supporting Information review atOrganic Letters. A.M. Hunter 4:45CINF 86.Sustainable processes for chemical data publishing – our experiences as a society publisher. R. Kidd,G. Jones 5:10CINF 87.Enabling FAIR data in the Earth and space sciences. S. Stall, K. Lehnert, L. Wyborn, E. Robinson, H. Glaves, M. Parsons, B. Hanson, J. Cutcher-Gershenfeld, B. Nosek, L. Yarmey

126

SECTION A

Skolnik Symposium: De Novo Design G. Schneider,Organizer, Presiding 9:00CINF 88.Molecular recognition studies to advance structure-based drug design. F.N. Diederich 9:25CINF 89.Computer-aided discovery of enzyme inhibitors. W.L. Jorgensen 9:50CINF 90.Massive computational docking experiments to identify noble gases target for new ‘atomic drugs’. D.A. Winkler, A. Thornton, G. Farjot, I. Katz 10:15Intermission. 10:30CINF 91.Progression saturation analysis of analog series using virtual candidate compounds. J. Bajorath 10:55CINF 92.Novel method proposing chemical structures with desirable profile of activities based on chemical and protein spaces. K. Funatsu 11:20CINF 93.Chemography: Toward “universal” maps of drug-like space. A. Varnek

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Chemistry Librarians of the Future Cosponsored by CHED J. R. Garritano, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 8:20Introductory Remarks. 8:25CINF 94.History and perspective of chemical information services: Time for a return to the library chemist. V.F. Scalfani 8:50CINF 95.Reimagining chemistry librarianship: From the bench to the stacks. N. Ruhs 9:15CINF 96.Changing the landscape of the chemistry librarianship. N. Bharti 9:40Intermission. 9:55CINF 97.Ten plus years as a chemistry librarian, where have they gone? J. Carver 10:20CINF 98.Pre- and post-research group selection: Evolving roles for chemistry librarians. K. Deards,S. Jeong 10:45CINF 99.Nobody else is doing it: Teaching opportunities for the chemistry librarian of the future. J.N. Currano 11:10CINF 100.New models for chemistry library impacts through an international symposium. M.C. Schlembach, B.J. McCall 11:35Discussion.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Skolnik Symposium: De Novo Design G. Schneider,Organizer, Presiding 1:30CINF 101.Artificial Intelligence in drug design. K. Baringhaus 1:55CINF 102.Robot scientists: Automating drug design. R.D. King 2:20CINF 103.Accelerating drug discovery through a fully automated Design-Make-Test-Analyze workflow. M. Kossenjans 2:45Intermission. 3:00CINF 104.Data-driven drug discovery and repositioning by machine learning methods. Y. Yamanishi 3:25CINF 105.Pattern recognition on neuromorphic hardware inspired by the chemical sense. M. Schmuker 3:50CINF 106.Rethinking molecular design. G. Schneider

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Chemistry Librarians of the Future Cosponsored by CHED J. R. Garritano, L. R. McEwen, V. F. Scalfani,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 107.Workflows for scholarly communication and knowledge creation: Building partnership between researchers and librarians of the future. Y. Li 2:00CINF 108.Chemistry librarians and disciplinary data repositories working in partnership. I. Bruno, A. Sarjeant, L. Palumbo, C. Castle 2:25CINF 109.Science librarians and the future of open science. D. Wrublewski, G.P. Clement, T.E. Morrell 2:50Intermission. 3:05CINF 110.Hiring a post-doc in chemistry data curation within a research library: The strategies and complexities. J. Laherty 3:30CINF 111.Chemistry librarians as future managers and leaders. J.R. Garritano,A.B. Twiss-Brooks 3:55CINF 112.Building chemistry research collections in the 21stcentury is a cooperative, collaborative effort. G. Baysinger 4:20CINF 113.Stewarding chemical research through standards development: A chemistry librarian’s feast. L.R. McEwen,E. Hepler-Smith 4:45CINF 114.Reaxys education. R.E. Belford 5:10Discussion.

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

Move Away from the Lamppost & Find Druggable Targets R. Guha,Organizer T. I. Oprea,Organizer, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:35CINF 115.AI-driven target selection in drug discovery - exploring the undiscovered country. T.I. Oprea, O. Ursu, C.G. Bologa 9:00CINF 116.Beyond journal articles – extracting bioactivity data from patents. A. Gaulton, E. Cibrián Uhalte, P. Magarinos, G. Papadatos, A. Leach, T.I. Oprea 9:25CINF 117.Putting hard numbers on druggability: Comparing the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology with other chemistry-mapped sources in Swiss-Prot. C. Southan, J.L. Sharman, A.J. Pawson, S.D. Harding, E. Faccenda, J.A. Davies 9:50Intermission. 10:00CINF 118.Open targets: An innovative public-private partnership to deliver more sustainable target selection for drug discovery. A. Leach, I. Dunham,D. Hulcoop, A. Hersey, A. Gaulton, P. Magarinos 10:25CINF 119.Computational methods help find chemical matter to uncover novel biology. Y. Wang, J.L. Jenkins 10:50CINF 120.Integrative informatics approaches for unraveling the mysteries of rare diseases: Shedding the light on Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. R. Hajjo 11:15CINF 121.How to present knowledge about dark targets from 60 data sources and 10 data types. T. Sheils, D. Nguyen,R. Guha, N. Southall 11:40Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Machine Learning Scoring Functions S. Sirimulla,Organizer, Presiding 8:30CINF 122.Protein–ligand absolute binding affinity prediction via 3D-convolutional neural networks. G. De Fabritiis 8:55CINF 123.Two faces of machine learning scoring functions - model complexity vs feature engineering. M. Wojcikowski, M. Kukielka, M. Stepniewska-Dziubinska, P. Siedlecki 9:20CINF 124.Hydrogen bonding:Ab initioaccuracy from fast interatomic Gaussian approximation potentials. M. Öeren, G. Csanyi, D.J. Ponting, P. Hunt, M.D. Segall 9:45CINF 125.Artificial intelligence for predicting molecular electrostatic potentials (ESPs): A step towards developing ESP-guided knowledge-based scoring functions. M. Verdonk, R. Lewis, A. Bender, P.C. Rathi 10:10Intermission.

SECTION C Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom III

Semantics in Chemistry Vocabulary & Terminology S. J. Chalk, L. R. McEwen,Organizers, Presiding 8:30Introductory Remarks. 8:35CINF 130.Semantic properties and units for chemistry. S.J. Chalk 9:00CINF 131.Data standards, formal ontologies and software tools to facilitate integration, classification and modeling of drug discovery data. S.C. Schürer, J. Zheng, J. Turner, A. Koleti 9:25CINF 132.Towards an IUPAC ontology for chemistry. S.J. Chalk 9:50CINF 133.ChemOnt: A semantic-based ontology for chemical and biological data integration. Y. Djoumbou Feunang, D. Wishart, N. Karu, A. Marcu, E. Lo, A. Guo 10:15CINF 134.From text mining to knowledge: PubChem knowledge panels provide synopsis of chemical, gene, protein and disease term co-occurrences in biomedical literature. L. Zaslavsky, A. Gindulyte, P. Thiessen, E. Bolton 10:40Intermission. 10:55CINF 135.OntoloBridge: A semi-automated ontology update request system. J. Turner, A. Clark, H. McGinty, B.A. Bunin, S.C. Schürer 11:20CINF 136.Semantic representation of crystallography experiments. I. Bruno, A. Sarjeant 11:45CINF 137.Ontology design patterns for laboratory chemical process hazards. L.R. McEwen, C. Shimizu, M. Sarkar 12:10Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom II

The More the Merrier: Combine Drugs Together R. Guha, A. Zakharov,Organizers, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 138.Understanding drug and compound combinations and modelling synergy – Methods and applications. A. Bender 2:05CINF 139.Computational approach to HIV-1 drug resistance prediction based on relationships between viral genotype and combination of antiretroviral medicines. O. Tarasova, D.E. Kireev, D. Filimonov, V. Poroikov 2:35CINF 140.Chemical mixture evaluation using molecular-weight corrected fingerprints. O. Ursu, C.G. Bologa,T.I. Oprea 3:05Intermission. 3:20CINF 141.SynergySeq – Integration of disease and perturbation gene expression data to prioritize synergistic drug combinations in cancer. S. Schürer, V. Stathias, A. Jermakowicz, N. Ayad 3:50CINF 142.SSR: Structure-synergy relationships. L. Chen, K. Wilson, M.D. Hall, R. Guha 4:20CINF 143.Novel computational approach for predicting drug-carrier formulations of poorly soluble drugs. V.M. Alves, D. Hwang,E. Muratov, M. Sokolsky-Papkov, E. Varlamova, N. Vinod, C.C. Melo-Filho, R. Marreto, S. Taveira, C.H. Andrade,A. Tropsha, A. Kabanov 4:50Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Reaction Analytics F. van den Broek,Organizer, Presiding 1:30Introductory Remarks. 1:35CINF 144.Brief history of reaction analytics. F. van den Broek

2:00CINF 145.Automatic discovery and enumeration of new tactical combinations. S. Szymkuc, E. Gajewska, M. Startek, P. Dittwald, B. Grzybowski 2:25Intermission. 2:40CINF 146.Retrosynthetic software for practicing chemists: Novel and efficientin silicopathway design validated at the bench. L. Rickershauser 3:05CINF 147.Learning to plan chemical syntheses. M. Segler,M. Waller 3:30Intermission. 3:45CINF 148.Powerful algorithms in CASD systems: How important is the quality of the underlying data? Overview of results obtained with a transform library approach. V. Eigner Pitto, M.G. Hutchings, H. Saller 4:10CINF 149.Exploring the use of conditional generative adversarial networks (cGAN) to analyze chemical reactions via electron density fields. M. Clark

SECTION C Westin Boston Waterfront Harbor Ballroom III

Drug Discovery: Cheminformatic Approaches E. Davis,Organizer, Presiding 1:30CINF 150.Bringing assay protocols into the age of informatics. A. Clark 1:55CINF 151.Library enhancement through performance analysis of different components of high-throughput screening library against a variety of targets. A. Saha, M.D. Hack, T. Mirzadegan 2:20CINF 152.Chemical intelligence that makes hidden knowledge effortlessly reachable. J. David, A. Tarcsay, G. Imre 2:45CINF 153.Statistical-based database fingerprint: Application in ligand-based virtual screening. N. SánchezCruz, J. Medina Franco 3:10Intermission. 3:20CINF 154.Rational solvent selection in asymmetric hydrogenation using molecular descriptors and machine learning. Y. Amar, A.M. Schweidtmann, P.P. Deutsch, A. Lapkin 3:45CINF 155.Phenotypic screening aided by multitask prediction methods. A. de la Vega de León, V.J. Gillet 4:10CINF 156.CCCTK: High performance molecular informatics toolkit for the design of anti-cancer molecule. M. Karthikeyan

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Grand Ballroom A

Drug Discovery: Cheminformatic Approaches Cosponsored by AGRO E. Davis,Organizer, Presiding 8:30CINF 157.Implementing genetic algorithms and evolutionary strategies in conformer analysis. N. Harms, R.H. West 8:50CINF 158.Predicting accumulation in Gram-negative bacteria to design better antibiotics. B. Drown, M. Richter, P.J. Hergenrother 9:10CINF 159.Gearing transcriptomics towards highthroughput screening: Compound shortlisting from gene expression usingin silicoinformation. N. Aniceto,A. Bender, F. Nigsch 9:30CINF 160.How to achieve better results using ligand-based virtual screening of big chemical databases. P. Pogodin, A. Lagunin, A. Rudik, D. Filimonov, D. Druzhilovskiy, M.C. Nicklaus,V. Poroikov 9:50Intermission. 10:05CINF 161.Making virtual REAL: Expansion of the synthetically feasible chemical space. Y. Moroz 10:25CINF 162.NextMove for Chemspace: Millisecond search in a database of 100 million structures. O. Gavrylenko, Y. Moroz, R.A. Sayle, J. Mayfield 10:45CINF 163.Automated workflow for reproducible analysis of protein-ligand scoring functions. D. Castaneda Mogollon, S. Sirimulla, M. Hassan 11:05CINF 164.Driving efficiency and innovation in life sciences R&D. J.F. Donahue 11:25CINF 165.Analysis of anti-flavivirus and antienterovirus activity based on ViralChEMBL data. A. Orlov, A. Nikitina, V. Palyulin, D.I. Osolodkin

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Lewis

Reaction Analytics F. van den Broek,Organizer, Presiding 8:30CINF 166.Machine learning and continuous flow: Detection and correction of flow-incompatible reaction conditions. P.P. Plehiers, C.W. Coley, W.H. Green, G.B. Marin, C.V. Stevens, K. Van Geem 8:55CINF 167.Predicting reaction conditions for computergenerated SAVI reactions by machine learning from reaction databases. V. Delannée, M.C. Nicklaus 9:20Intermission. 9:35CINF 168.Using machine learning to recommend suitable conditions for organic reactions. H. Gao, T. Struble, C.W. Coley, W.H. Green, K.F. Jensen 10:00CINF 169.Analysing matched molecular pair transformations in drug discovery projects as a function of time and molecular environment. S. Ashenden, T. Kogej, O. Engkvist, E. Rivers, A. Madin, K. Goldberg, I. Storer,A. Bender 10:25Intermission. 10:40CINF 170.Regioselectivity: An application of expert systems and ontologies to chemical (named) reaction analysis. R.A. Sayle, J. Mayfield, T. Blaschke, N.M. O’Boyle 11:05CINF 171.Representing organic reactions through InChI differences. M.A. Walker,J. Paliakkara 11:30CINF 172.Automatically finding and fixing mistakes in detailed kinetic models of combustion. N. Harms, R.H. West

TOXI

Division of Chemical Toxicology T. Spratt, Program Chair SOCIAL EVENTS: Reception, 6:30 PM: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting, 8:30 PM: Tue

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Translesion DNA Polymerases Z. Suo, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 TOXI 1. Mechanisms to coordinate multiple DNA polymerases for TLS. M.A. Trakselis 9:15 TOXI 2. Explosive mutation accumulation triggered by heterozygous human Pol ε proofreading-deficiency is driven by suppression of mismatch repair. Z.F. Purcell 9:55 Intermission. 10:10 TOXI 3. Finding their way: How error-prone polymerases gain access to the bacterial replisome. J.J. Loparo 10:50 TOXI 4. Mechanistic basis for the bypass of a bulky DNA adduct catalyzed by a Y-family DNA polymerase. R. Vayas, G. Efthimiopoulos, J. Tokarsky, C. Malik, A.K. Basu, Z. Suo

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Founders’ Award Cosponsored by PROF J. L. Bolton, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 TOXI 5. Biological targets of electrophilic furan metabolites. L.A. Peterson 1:50 TOXI 6. Mass spectrometry studies of DNA and protein adducts of reactive electrophiles. N.Y. Tretyakova 2:30 TOXI 7. Electrophilic targeting of Keap1/Nrf2 signalling for disease prevention and treatment. A. DinkovaKostova, T. Honda, A.Y. Abramov

127

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

10:20CINF 126.Deep learning based scoring function for predicting protein-ligand binding affinities. M. Hassan, D. Castaneda,S. Sirimulla 10:45CINF 127.Evaluating lead optimization performance of a structure-based convolutional neural network. A. Heifets, M. Mysinger, I. Wallach, K.T. Nguyen 11:10CINF 128.Mechanism-of-action elucidation using deep convolutional neural networks. A. Rossi, I. Wallach, M. Mysinger, K.T. Nguyen, A. Heifets 11:35CINF 129.Simulated playground for evaluating machine-learning algorithms for bioactivity prediction. J. Thompson, S. Schrodl, M. Mysinger, I. Wallach

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

TOXI/CHAL 3:10 Intermission. 3:25 TOXI 8. Chasing rainbows? Targeted covalent ligand design guided by precision electrophile signaling technologies. Y. Aye 4:05 TOXI 9. Botanicals electrophiles modify multiple targets. J.L. Bolton

Innovations in Chemistry Supporting Strategic Human Health Risk Assessments Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by CHAS and TOXI

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Student/Post-Doc E. G. Prestwich, U. Sarkar, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 TOXI 10. Repair and processing of DNA lesions induced by a dynamic electrophile. S. Byrne, K. Yang, S. Rokita 8:20 TOXI 11. Mechanisms of bioactivation of the tobacco carcinogens and 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AαC) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) in human bladder. M. Bellamri, L. Yao, R. Turesky 8:40 TOXI 12. Development of a novel approach for measuring N’-nitrosnornicotine bioactivation in humans by using deuterium-labeled analogs. E. Carlson, A. Goode, V. Gurvich, I. Stepanov, V. Jain, P. Upadhyaya, S.S. Hecht 9:00 TOXI 13. Scheduled LC-SRM method for targeted DNA adductome analysis. Y. Cui, P. Wang, Y. Wang 9:20 Intermission. 9:30 TOXI 14. Significant impact of divalent metal ions on the fidelity, sugar selectivity, and drug incorporation efficiency of human PrimPol. J. Tokarsky, P. Wallenmeyer, K. Phi, Z. Suo 9:50 TOXI 15. Incorporating histone H2A variants facilitates global excision of uracil residues in nucleosomes. C. Li, S. Delaney 10:10 TOXI 16. Integrating multi-“omics”- mass spectrometry-based methods to characterize electronic cigarette exposure in humans. R.P. Dator, P.W. Villalta, C.J. Hooyman, L.A. Maertens, S. Balbo 10:30 TOXI 17. The C’5-pseudouridinyl radical. I. Sappy 10:50 Intermission. 11:00 TOXI 18. Transcriptional inhibition and repair mechanism of alkyl phosphotriester DNA adducts in mammalian cells. Y. Tan, J. Wu, Y. Wang 11:20 TOXI 19. Mass spectroscopy-based metabolomics reveals new insights on the biological effects of copper oxide nanoparticles in a human colon carcinoma cell line. N.G. Chavez Soria, D.S. Aga, G. Atilla-Gokcumen 11:40 TOXI 20. Sensitive method for quantitation of abasic sites in isolated and cellular DNA by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. H. Chen, C.J. Rizzo, R.J. Turesky

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Chemical Toxicology of Nanomaterials S. Balbo, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:05 TOXI 21. Future of nanotoxicology research: Filling knowledge gaps to safeguard health. A. Elder 1:45 TOXI 22. Investigation of toxicity mechanism of nanoscale lithium battery material NMC to bacterial models. V. Feng 2:25 TOXI 23. Size, surface chemistry and reactivity – all matter as toxicity determinants of fibrous nanomaterials. A.A. Shvedova 3:05 Intermission. 3:20 TOXI 24. DNA methylation alterations by nanoparticles. L. Godderis 4:00 TOXI 25. Nanomaterial induced mechanisms: Focus on nano cell interactions. A. Kraegeloh

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix T. Spratt, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00

128

37-38, 40, 43-44, 48, 53, 56-57, 59, 64, 67, 70, 76, 78-79, 81-83, 90. See subsequent listings.

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Mechanisms of Binding, Transport & Biotransformation of Toxic Metals Cosponsored by INOR B. P. Rosen, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 TOXI 26. Mechanisms of binding, transport & biotransformation of toxic metals. T. Pinter, L. Ruckthong, c. ervin, V.L. Pecoraro 9:15 TOXI 27. ArsI, a C-As lyase for degradation of environmental organoarsenicals. V.S. Nadar, M. Yoshinaga, B.P. Rosen 10:00 TOXI 28. Understanding the mechanism of carbonmetal bond cleavage by the organomercurial lyase MerB. H. Wahba, M. Stevenson, D. Wilcox, J.G. Omichinski 10:45 TOXI 29. Interplay of copper transport proteins in the processing of platinum anticancer drugs in the cell. N. Dolgova, C. Yu, O. Dmitriev

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Chemical Research in Toxicology Young Investigator Award W. Chan, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 Introductory Remarks. 1:10 TOXI 30. Oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids: Are they toxic or bioactive? J. Lee 1:50 TOXI 31. Antibiotics induce nitrosative stress in microorganisms. C.T. Chan 2:30 Intermission. 2:45 TOXI 32. Advances in human biomonitoring of carcinogens by ion trap and high resolution accurate mass spectrometry. R. Turesky 3:25 TOXI 33. Chemical approaches to investigate the toxicity of aristolochic acids. W. Chan

SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Keynote Lectures T. Spratt, Organizer N. E. Geacintov, Presiding 4:30 Introductory Remarks. 4:40 TOXI 34. Linking mutational spectra of chemical carcinogens to the mutational patterns seen in human tumors. J. Essigmann, B.I. Fedeles

TUESDAY EVENING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Galleria

Posters T. Spratt, Organizer 7:00 – 9:00 TOXI 35. Prediction of carcinogenic behavior of hexacyclic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using aromatic sextet theory and ionization potentials. J.O. Ona Ruales TOXI 36. Toxic effects and molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia magna. J. Hou TOXI 37. Modified 3-deaza-3-alkyl-adenosines as minor groove alkylation mimics in translesion DNA synthesis. L.J. Weselinski, V. Begoyan, G. Kenyon, M. Tanasova TOXI 38. Ultrasensitive high-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of methyl DNA phosphate adducts in human lung. B. Ma, P.W. Villalta, J.B. Hochalter, I. Stepanov, S.S. Hecht TOXI 39. Screening for DNA adducts in human colon by high-resolution nano-ESI UHPLC/MSn. D. Konorev, R. Turesky TOXI 40. Application of an in silico tool for the risk assessment of an industrial process compliant to ICH M7 guidelines. M. Burns, M. Ott, S.J. Webb TOXI 41. Methylation in human hemoglobin is associated with age as analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. H.C. Chen, S. Ip TOXI 42. Characterizing uracil DNA glycosylase processivity in nucleosome core particles. E. Kennedy, S. Delaney

TOXI 43. Structural and dynamic impact of single ribonucleotide incorporation on nucleosome structure. I. Fu, D. Smith, S. Broyde TOXI 44. Identification of photo-degradation products of nitroguanidine and toxicological implications. L. Moores, A. Kennedy, K.A. Gust, M.K. Shukla, L.K. Rabalais, D.L. Henderson, S.J. Jones TOXI 45. Gallic acid derivatives inhibit DNA repair enzyme ALKBH2. Q. Tang, F. Chen, H. Ma, K. Bian, D. Li TOXI 46. Conformation-specific replication block from bulky 4-aminobiphenyl-modified DNA lesions. A. Cai, K. Bian, F. Chen, D. Li, B. Cho TOXI 47. Mutagenicity of DNA-peptide crosslink in human cells. S. Naldiga, S. Ji, G. Moldovan, N.Y. Tretyakova, A.K. Basu TOXI 48. Efficiency of initiating base excision repair on nucleosome substrates. A. Garlow, S. Delaney TOXI 49. Replication studies of N3-methyladenine in Escherichia coli cells. J. Yuan, Y. Wang TOXI 50. Unmasking the role of protein modification in the observed toxicity of aristolochic acid. C. Chan, W. Chan TOXI 51. Adverse reactions induced by the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine may stem from its metabolic biotransformation to carbamazepine. I. Martins, C. Charneira, M. Marques, A. Antunes TOXI 52. Identification of 4-(methylnitroamino)-1(3-pyridyl-1-oxide)-1-butanone, a novel metabolite of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) in rat urine. L. von Weymarn, R. Dator, S. Balbo, S.E. Murphy TOXI 53. Initiation of repair of DNA nucleobase lesions in the nucleosome core particle. M.E. Tarantino, S. Delaney TOXI 54. Dual cell system for in vitro studies of toxic blood gases. W.G. Senanayake, I. Petrikovics, D.E. Thompson TOXI 55. Analysis of acrolein-derived 1,N2propanodeoxyguanosine adducts in human lung DNA from smokers and nonsmokers. J. Yang, S. Balbo, P.W. Villalta, S.S. Hecht TOXI 56. High-resolution/accurate mass DNA adductomics to screen for doxorubicin-induced adducts as biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy. A. Stornetta, K. Walters, R.P. Dator, V. Guidolin, P.W. Villalta, S. Balbo TOXI 57. Molecular level studies of the impact of poly (oxonorbornenes) and their gold nanoparticles conjugates on D. rerio. embryos. J.N. Klutts, A. Laranang, Z. Zheng, J. Saar, K. Lienkamp, R. Brewster, Z. Rosenzweig TOXI 58. Oxidation and removal of cytosine derivatives in the nucleosome. P. Caffrey, S. Delaney TOXI 59. Determining the basis of E. coli DinB and human pol kappa DNA damage specificity. H. Stern, T.A. Coulther, J. Winters, C.L. Mills, M.J. Ondrechen, P. Beuning TOXI 60. Prediction of the interaction region between the Y-family polymerase DinB and the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd in E. coli. S.K. Fields, P. Beuning TOXI 61. Machine learning models for predicting hepatic steatosis based on in vivo data. B. Zdrazil, S. Jain, S. Klinting, S. Escher, G.F. Ecker, U. Norinder TOXI 62. Predicting drug metabolites using bacterial-based models. P.C. Rosado, J.P. Cruz, M.C. Justino, M. Marques, G.C. Justino TOXI 63. Characterization of LexA-regulated protein YbfE in E. coli. A. Hotchkiss, C. Kramer, P. Beuning TOXI 64. DNA damage induced by oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in leukocyte DNA from African-American and Caucasian smokers. C. Ruszczak, B. Ma, J. Jensen, D. Hatsukami, I. Stepanov TOXI 65. Analysis of the spectrum of DNA modifications in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. E.A. Carlson, N.C. Wamer, T.A. Dodson, E.G. Prestwich TOXI 66. Probing the conformational dynamics of the Beta sliding clamp in Escherichia coli. M.L. Liriano, B. Koleva, P. Beuning TOXI 67. Potential DNA oxidation adducts for disease biomarkers. N.C. Wamer, E.A. Carlson, T.A. Dodson, E.G. Prestwich TOXI 68. Rapid microplate assay for acellular reactive oxygen species generation induced by engineered nanomaterials in real-time. R. Coreas, W. Zhong TOXI 69. Identifying toxicology concepts in the replacement of mercury catalysts during the acetylene hydrochlorination of vinyl chloride monomers. L. Green, J. Marshall, A.S. Cannon TOXI 70. Petrogenic and pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in human urine: comparison of their levels between two geographic regions. C. Mesaros, M. Huang, L.C. Hackfeld, R.P. Hodge, I.A. Blair, T.M. Penning

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Nanomaterials in Drug Delivery: Efficacy & Toxicity Considerations Cosponsored by MEDI P. F. Guengerich, W. G. Humphreys, N. A. Meanwell, Organizers, Presiding 8:00 Introductory Remarks. 8:05 TOXI 92. What exactly is toxic about colloidal nanoparticle formulations? Results from the molecular level and the cellular level. C.J. Murphy 8:45 TOXI 93. Targeting or enhanced selectivity: Toxicological considerations of nanoparticle therapeutics. R. Darvari 9:25 TOXI 94. Expansile nanoparticles for the treatment of intraperitoneal mesothelioma. M.W. Grinstaff 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 TOXI 95. Debugging nano–bio interfaces. M. Mahmoudi

11:00 TOXI 96. Understanding mast cell activation in the safe development of nanotechnologies. J. Brown

Intellectual Property Basics for Chemical Businesses

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information

SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Marina Ballroom I

Topics in Chemical Toxicology P. Beuning, Organizer T. Spratt, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 TOXI 97. Base and nucleotide excision repair of site-specific oxidatively generated guanine lesions in DNA substrates transfected into human cells. V. Shafirovich, K. Kropachev, M. Kolbanovskiy, N.E. Geacintov 1:20 TOXI 98. Reduction pathway-dependent cytotoxicity of reduced graphene oxide. C. Zhang, Q. Zhang 1:40 TOXI 99. Site-specific production of hydroxyl radicals and synergistic DNA damage induced by the non-enzymatic activation of the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid by Cu(II). B. Zhu 2:00 TOXI 100. Insights into the molecular mechanism of alkylation- and platination-induced mutagenesis. S. Lee, Y. Kou 2:20 TOXI 101. Kinetic basis of DNA synthesis by human DNA polymerase/primase PrimPol. L. Zhao 2:40 Intermission. 3:00 TOXI 102. Levels of glyoxal-induced hemoglobin modifications correlate with DNA cross-links in human blood as determined by mass spectrometry. H.C. Chen, C. Liu 3:20 TOXI 103. High mobility group box 1: A re-evaluation of its role in cancer. I.A. Blair, L. Weng, L. Guo, A. Vachani, C. Mesaros 3:40 TOXI 104. Determining associations between transcriptomics and toxicity using co-expression network methods. B. Alexander-Dann, T. James, A. Bender 4:00 TOXI 105. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory complex - Structure-based prediction of toxicity. G.F. Ecker, F. Troger, S. Jain, B. Zdrazil 4:20 TOXI 106. Configurational and conformational equilibria of the N6-(2-Deoxy-D-erythro-pentofuranoysl-)-2,6diamino-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-5-N-methylformamidopyrimidine (MeFapy-dG) lesion in DNA. M.P. Stone, S.N. Bamberger, C.K. Malik, T.L. Johnson-Salyard, S.K. Brown, H. Pan, C.J. Rizzo, M.W. Voehler 4:40 TOXI 107. Using open bioactivity data for developing machine-learning prediction models for chemical modulators of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) signaling pathway. S. Kim

CHAL

Division of Chemistry and the Law K. Bianco and K. McIntyre, Program Chairs SOCIAL EVENTS: Luncheon, 12:00 PM: Mon Reception, 6:00 PM: Mon BUSINESS MEETINGS: Business Meeting, 5:00 PM: Sun

Sponsored by SCHB, Cosponsored by CHAL and PROF Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHAL and CPRM

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

Developments in Pharmaceutical Patent Law Cosponsored by PROF B. C. Trinque, Organizer, Presiding 9:00 CHAL 2. Pharmaceutical patent prosecution primer. B.C. Trinque 9:30 CHAL 3. Obviousness, the CAFC, and second generation filing strategies. B. Vaughan 10:30 CHAL 4. What constitutes an inventor? A review of Federal Circuit case law. A.R. Ehle 11:00 CHAL 5. Definiteness and the Medicines Co. and Forest Labs decisions. B.C. Trinque

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

Extensions to Patent Term in the U.S. & Worldwide R. G. Bone, Organizer, Presiding 2:15 CHAL 6. Extensions to patent term in the U.S. and worldwide. R. Bone 2:30 CHAL 7. Patent term extension in the U.S.. K. Connarn 3:00 CHAL 8. Supplementary protection certificates in the European Union. I. Finnie 3:30 CHAL 9. Patent term extensions and data exclusivity in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. J. Gledhill, J. Landells 4:00 CHAL 10. Patent term adjustment in the U.S.. R. Bone

MONDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

Sci-Mix K. E. Bianco, K. McIntyre, Organizers 8:00 – 10:00 CHAL 11. Chocolate: Food of the gods. H.M. Peters, S.B. Peters CHAL 12. National Inventors Hall of Fame. H.M. Peters, S.B. Peters

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

Recent Developments in the Protection of Nanotechnology-Related Intellectual Property Cosponsored by MPPG K. E. Bianco, K. McIntyre, Organizers, Presiding 9:30 CHAL 13. Outside the box: Options for protecting your nanotechnology intellectual property. K. McIntyre 10:15 CHAL 14. Obviousness primer: Protecting your nanotechnology against obviousness challenges. A. Lipton 11:00 CHAL 15. Recent developments in post-grant review proceedings. K.E. Bianco

SUNDAY MORNING

TUESDAY AFTERNOON

Chemical Structure Searching for Patent Information

SECTION A

Sponsored by CINF, Cosponsored by CHAL and CPRM

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

SUNDAY AFTERNOON

Protecting Your Ideas in the Chemical Arts

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

Strengthening Your Patent Rights in Light of Recent Federal Circuit Court Decisions A. H. Berks, X. Pillai, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 CHAL 1. Review of recent Federal Circuit decisions relevant to what scientists need to know about patent filing and prosecution. X. Pillai, A. Berks

Cosponsored by SCHB A. Khankin, Organizer, Presiding 1:00 CHAL 16. Biopharmaceutical due diligence considerations. K. McGough 1:30 CHAL 17. Patent law basics for chemists. S. Vathyam 2:00 CHAL 18. Overview of Inter Partes proceeding. G. Yang 2:30 CHAL 19. Inter Partes Review and its effects on patent valuation. T. Palmer

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

TOXI 71. Dissecting interactions between E. coli DNA polymerase III and single-stranded DNA binding protein to gain insights into polymerase management. J. McIsaac, M. Ondrechen, P.J. Beuning TOXI 72. Release of lead (Pb) and formation of disinfection byproducts during drinking water disinfection in the water distribution system. J. Liu, V.K. Sharma, C.M. Sayes TOXI 73. Mineralogy dependent dissolution of inhaled uranium in simulated lung fluids in uranium mine lands, New Mexico. E. Hettiarachchi, S. Paul, D. Cadol, B. Frey, G. Rubasinghege TOXI 74. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent release of an inhibitor from an aptamer. G. Premnauth, E.J. Merino TOXI 75. Effect of surface charge on toxicity of AuNPs; Are cationic AuNPs toxic? E. Lee, Y. Kwon TOXI 76. Nanomaterials in marine environment: toxicity to Artemia salina with and without the presence of Phe and Cd2+. J. Lu, X. Lv, Z. Chen, X. Zhu TOXI 77. Molecular characterization of alcohol-induced DNA damage for cancer prevention. V. Guidolin, A. Carra’, P.W. Villalta, E. Carlson, S. Balbo TOXI 78. EB-Fapy-dG adducts of 1,3-butadiene: Synthesis, structural identification, and detection in human cells. S.S. Pujari, A. Groehler, D. Najjar, N.Y. Tretyakova TOXI 79. Inter-individual differences in metabolism of 1,3-butadiene. A. Degner, G. Madugundu, R. Arora, L.A. Peterson, N.Y. Tretyakova TOXI 80. 2, 2’, 3, 5’, 6 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB-95) induce behavioral and GABAgenic neurotransmitter changes in zebrafish at early developmental exposure. P. Ranasinghe, C.M. Lee TOXI 81. Investigation of the effect of 2-phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) on the levels of 4-hydroxy-1-(3-pyridyl)1-butanone-releasing DNA adducts in oral cells of smokers. A. Jain, G. Yakovlev, B. Ma, I. Stepanov TOXI 82. Smoking and inflammation mediated epigenetic changes in a mouse model of lung cancer. J. Fernandez, C. Seiler, Q. Han, N.Y. Tretyakova TOXI 83. Independent synthesis and fate of DNA lesions generated from oxidative damage at the C-3’ and C-5’ position of deoxyribonucleotides. M. Bedi, A.C. BryantFriedrich TOXI 84. Ecotoxicology of nano-perovskites in aquatic environment. T. Zhou, W. Fan TOXI 85. Thermodynamic exposure reduction by amendment techniques to limit bioaccumulation during ongoing depositional input – a sediment mesocosm study with three organisms. A.P. Wang TOXI 86. MegaTox for predicting compound liabilities. K.M. Zorn, T. Lane, D.P. Russo, A. Clark, S. Ekins TOXI 87. Information-derived adverse outcome pathways with a case study on structural cardiotoxicity. A. Bender TOXI 88. Morphology-dependent cytotoxicity of SiC nanomaterials to human mesenchymal stem cells. F. Chen, G. Li, E. Zhao, J.V. Jokerst TOXI 89. Nanotoxicity predictive modeling: A case study on metal oxides nanoparticles. B. Rasulev TOXI 90. Surface-modified gold nanoparticles and their long-term impact on cellular pathways. P. Falagan Lotsch, E. Grzincic, C.J. Murphy TOXI 91. Noninvasive measurement of bladder carcinogen DNA adducts in human urinary cells by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. B. Yun, M. Bellamri, S. Krishnamachari, R. Turesky

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

CHAL/COLL 3:00 CHAL 20. The wide world of chemical arts. A. Simpson 3:30 CHAL 21. Ways to protect small molecule drugs. E. Weeks 4:00 CHAL 22. Structuring a small molecule patent portfolio. A. Khankin 4:30 CHAL 23. Drug lifecycle management: The interplay between patent and FDA marketing exclusivity. T. Leavy

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

Non-Traditional Careers in Chemistry Cosponsored by PROF, SCHB, WCC and YCC K. E. Bianco, K. McIntyre, Organizers, Presiding 9:30 CHAL 24. Careers beyond the lab: chemical information professional. J. Duberman 10:00 CHAL 25. Navigating the path from graduate school to a career in patent law. C. Rodrigo 10:30 CHAL 26. Careers in patent law: A litigator’s perspective. K. McIntyre 11:00 CHAL 27. Careers in the federal government. A. Ehrlich 11:30 Panel Discussion.

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 154

The Many Faces of CHAL: Where Chemistry Meets the Law K. McIntyre, Organizer K. E. Bianco, Organizer, Presiding 1:30 CHAL 28. Legal origins of the New England Compounding Center (NECC) crisis and the future of drug compounding regulation. D.P. Pleynet, L.R. Takaoka, M. Rodwin 2:00 CHAL 29. Innovation in renewable energy: How patent strategy can support business objectives. K.M. Caldwell 2:30 CHAL 30. Smart contracts and blockchain technology in the chemistry industry. K.M. Caldwell 3:00 CHAL 31. Patents as a research, business and career tool. C. Turoski 3:30 CHAL 32. Deriving insights from IP search reports. E.N. Cheeseman

Pesticides & Chemophobia in the News: What You Need to Know as a Scientist & Consumer Sponsored by AGRO, Cosponsored by AGFD, CHAL, CHAS and ENVR

COLL

Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry R. Nagarajan, Program Chair OTHER SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST: 2D Materials: Innovative Materials & Devices for Energy & Fuels (see ENFL, Sun, Mon) Bioconjugate Chemistry Lectureship & Award: Symposium in honor of Wolfgang Parak (see PMSE, Tue) Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization (see CELL, Wed, Thu) Interfacial Chemistry under Nano-scale Confinement (see GEOC, Sun) Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes (see ANYL, Wed) Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier (see ANYL, Sun, Mon) SOCIAL EVENTS: COLL Social Hour with Poster Session, 6:00 PM: Sun COLL Luncheon, 12:15 PM: Tue BUSINESS MEETINGS:

130

COLL Program & Executive Committee Meeting, 4:00 PM: Sat COLL Open Business Meeting, 5:30 PM: Sun

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Advances in Colloid & Surface Chemistry Enabled by Cryogenic & In Situ Liquid-cell Electron Microscopy N. D. Burrows, M. R. Jones, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 1. Improving quantification in liquid cell electron microscopy of materials reactions. F.M. Ross 9:00 COLL 2. Comparing contrast and electron irradiance limits for soft matter in cryogenic and in-situ liquid-cell electron microscopy. J.E. Evans 9:30 COLL 3. Advances in electron imaging and spectroscopy of nanomaterials at cryogenic temperatures. L. Kourkoutis 10:00 COLL 4. Using sub-sampled STEM and inpainting to control the kinetics and observation efficiency of dynamic processes in liquids. N.D. Browning 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 COLL 5. Efficient dispersion of oil by blends of food-grade surfactants: Role suggested by Cryo-EM of nanostructures forming at the interface. D. Riehm, L. Corcoran, R. Penn, G.D. Bothun, S.R. Raghavan, V.T. John, A. McCormick 11:15 COLL 6. Morphological study of microgel-based colloidal systems by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Z. Kochovski, H. Jia, Y. Lu 11:45 COLL 7. Cryo-SEM imaging and analysis of peptidecomplexed microgels. J. Liang, X. Xiao, T. Chou, M. Libera 12:05 COLL 8. Observing phase transitions of amphiphilic block copolymers in solution by liquid cell TEM. N.C. Gianneschi

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Colloidal & Interfacial Science in Separation Processes I. Chernyshova, Organizer Q. Liu, S. Ponnurangam, P. Somasundaran, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 9. Using ionic liquids to take advantage of the many facets of chitin: Tailor-made high surface area nanofibrous sorbent mats for selective separations of metal ions. R.D. Rogers, G. Gurau 9:05 COLL 10. Tuning viscoelastic behavior of particlestabilized emulsions for enhanced oil recovery applications. B. Pilapil, A. Pandey, M. Derakhshandeh, A. Meimanova, A. Govedarica, S. Bryant, M. Trifkovic 9:30 COLL 11. Statistics of dispersity of nanosheets by stabilizing oil and water interface. H.V. Kumar, Z. Zhang, W. Dickinson, S.R. Bapat, H.C. Schniepp, D.H. Adamson 9:50 COLL 12. Competition between the hydrolysisphosphate precipitation reactions in wastewater coagulation. H. Ratnaweera 10:10 COLL 13. Practical approaches to modified “smart” fabrics for oil/water separation from stabilized emulsions. M. Lehtinen, Z. Wang, G. Liu 10:30 Intermission. 10:45 COLL 14. Micelle based separations: From small molecules to proteins to nanoparticles. R. Nagarajan 11:15 COLL 15. Enhancement of the solid-liquid separation in oil sands tailings treatment using silica nanoparticles. A. Govedarica, S. Shamim, M. Trifkovic, A. Abid 11:40 COLL 16. Nanoscale view of assisted ion transport across the liquid-liquid interface. M.L. Schlossman 12:00 COLL 17. Controlled architecture of amine ligands decorated glass fiber/poly(glycidyl methacrylate) composites via surface-initiated ICAR ATRP mediated by mussel-inspired polydopamine chemistry for uranium extraction from seawater. W. Wang, G. Ye, J. Chen

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Particle Sizing of Nanoparticles: From Regulatory & Metrology Aspects to Application & Analysis J. D. Clogston, V. A. Hackley, P. Lim Soo, A. Prina-Mello, S. Puri, S. Svenson, X. Xu, Organizers J. Clogston, P. Lim Soo, Presiding

8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 18. Regulatory science and considerations for drug products containing nanomaterials: FDA perspective. C. Cruz 9:05 COLL 19. Engineering and development of novel antibody-directed nanotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer. D.C. Drummond 9:35 Intermission. 9:50 COLL 20. Metrological challenges and issues related to measurement of nanoparticle size. D. Kaiser 10:10 COLL 21. Orthogonal approaches to sizing of nanomaterials in the pharmaceutical environment. S. Sonzini, K. Treacher, Z. Nazir, S. Puri 10:30 COLL 22. At-line DLS for real-time monitoring of particle size in a nanoemulsion process. M. Mahoney 10:50 Intermission. 11:05 COLL 23. Resonant mass measurement technique for subvisible particle characterization: Applications in the nanomedicine arena. B. Coyne, J. Hadley 11:15 COLL 24. Innovations in single particle and single cell ICP-MS – Accurate measurements of particle number in cells. C. Stephan, R. Merrifield 11:25 COLL 25. Is that peak real? Separating truth from fiction in particle analysis. J. Fraikin, F. Monzon, L. Brown 11:35 Intermission. 11:50 Panel Discussion. 12:20 COLL 26. What does it take to accurately measure concentration of particles in colloids? J.K. Tatarkiewicz

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Heating with Colloidal Nanoparticles: Physical Mechanisms & Applications in Life Science P. del Pino, L. Liz Marzan, W. Parak, Organizers N. Feliu, Presiding 8:30 COLL 27. Photothermal effects of plasmonic nanoparticles: fundamentals and applications. N.J. Halas 9:00 COLL 28. Janus Fe3O4-Au magnetic-plasmonic nanoparticles for sensing, hyperthermia, and molecular imaging. J. Reguera, D. Jimenez de Aberasturi, J. Langer, M. Henriksen-Lacey, L. Liz Marzan 9:30 COLL 29. Photothermal response of gold nanorods prepared using A CTAB-aromatic additive system. I.W. Guo, M.C. Wang, I. Pekcevik, B.D. Gates 9:50 COLL 30. Photoacoustic alternative to MR thermometry during photothermal therapy. D.M. Charron, H.H. Buzzá, R. Weersink, G. Zheng 10:10 Intermission. 10:40 COLL 31. Conversion of light energy into heat and hot electrons using hybrid nanostructures with plasmonic hot spots. A. Govorov 11:10 COLL 32. Controlling the cellular uptake of plasmonic nanoparticles by host-guest interactions for optical hyperthermia. J. Mosquera Mosquera, I. García, M. Henriksen-Lacey, L. Liz Marzan 11:40 COLL 33. Hybrid nanoscale architectures: Plasmonic and magnetic induced heating applications. S. Hunyadi Murph 12:00 COLL 34. Thermogel nanocomposites designed for biofilm disruption. A.S. Samia

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, Organizer R. Nagarajan, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 35. Fabrication of ZnO/CuO vertically-aligned tree-like nanostructure and its application in solar energy conversion. Z. Li, M. Jia, B. Abraham, J. Blake, D. Bodine, J.T. Newberg, L. Gundlach 8:50 COLL 36. Autoperforation of two-dimensional materials for generating colloidal electronic devices. P. Liu, A. Liu, D. Kozawa, J. Dong, V. Koman, S. Wang, M. Wong, M. Strano 9:10 COLL 37. Hierarchical porous SiC for efficient electromagnetic interference shielding at elevated temperatures. Z. Wang 9:30 COLL 38. Oxidative dissolution and antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles: The role of particle dimensions, surface coating and shape. Q. Zhang, Y. Hu, V.L. Colvin

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Understanding Nano-Bio Interactions: Implications for Bio-Imaging, Diagnosis & Treatment B. Kim, S. Wilhelm, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 45. Gold nanoparticles and biology: A perspective. R. Levy 9:00 COLL 46. Engineering cellular interactions with nanolayered particles for controlled trafficking and delivery. P.T. Hammond 9:30 Intermission. 9:40 COLL 47. Nanomachines biointerfacing via cell membrane cloaking for active delivery and removal. L. Zhang 10:10 COLL 48. Improving intracellular RNA delivery through nanocarrier design. E.S. Day 10:40 Intermission. 10:50 COLL 49. Size-dependent delivery of nanoparticles to brain assisted by focused ultrasound-mediated BBB disruption. S. Ohta, E. Kikuchi, A. Ishijima, E. Kobayashi, T. Azuma, I. Sakuma, T. Ito 11:10 COLL 50. Site-selective and controlled immobilization of leptin on nanoparticles for improving cellular uptake. V. Maggi, V. Mangini, A. Trianni, F. Melle, R. Fiammengo 11:30 COLL 51. Heterocellular 3D platforms and in vivo dual-nanotracer molecular imaging provide clinically-relevant insights to facilitate the development of antibody-targeted, NIR-active nanotherapeutics. G. Obaid, S. Bano, K. Samkoe, S. Mallidi, J. Kuriakose, B. Pogue, T. Hasan 11:50 COLL 52. Investigating the in vitro/in vivo disconnect using gold nanoparticles. J.M. Berlin 12:10 COLL 53. Gold nanospikes enable capture and release of circulating tumor cells. L. Scarabelli, G.A. Vinnacombe, L.K. Heidenreich, N. Chiang, S.J. Jonas, P.S. Weiss

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Clinical Translation G. Han, Z. Wang, J. Xie, Organizers Z. Gu, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 54. Ultrasmall core-shell silica nanoparticles as targeted imaging probes for cancer nanomedicine: Design, evaluation and clinical translation. M. Bradbury 9:00 COLL 55. Promoting intratumoral delivery, active targeting and clearance with sub-5 nm ultrafine magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. H. Mao 9:30 COLL 56. Noninvasive fluorescence kidney functional imaging enabled by renal clearable luminescent gold nanoparticles. M. Yu, X. Ning, J. Xu, B. Du, J. Zheng, J. Zhou, J. Hsieh, P. Kapur 9:50 COLL 57. Treatment of bacterial infections with peptide-targeted porous silicon nanoparticles. M.J. Sailor 10:20 COLL 58. Design considerations of contrast agents for bioimaging and nanomedicine. H. Choi, H. Kang 10:50 COLL 59. Glomerular barrier behaves as an atomically precise bandpass filter in a sub-nanometre regime. B. Du

11:10 COLL 60. Light, heat and sound to enhance nanoparticle delivery to the tumors. M. Overchuk, C. Pellow, D. Charron, K. Harmatys, M. Rajora, J. Chen, G. Zheng 11:40 COLL 61. In vivo transport of engineered nanoparticles in the kidneys. J. Zheng 12:10 COLL 62. Tumor-targeted and clearable proteinbased MRI nanoprobes. Y. Zhao, J. Peng, G. Han

11:30 COLL 82. High-throughput study of the role of spatial organization on the activity of surface-bound enzymes. N. Alsharif, T. Lawton, J.R. Uzarski, K.A. Brown 11:50 COLL 83. Immunoassay investigation of vaccine carrier stability within ZIF-8 encapsulation. R.P. Welch, M.A. Luzuriaga, S. Li, J.J. Gassensmith

SECTION H

Sponsored by GEOC, Cosponsored by COLL

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Emulsions, Drops & Dispersions R. Nagarajan, Organizer Y. Kondo, Presiding 8:30 COLL 63. Formulation and stabilization of concentrated edible oil-in-water emulsions based on electrostatic complexes of a food-grade cationic surfactant (ethyl lauroyl arginate) and cellulose nanocrystals. L. Bai, W. Xiang, S. Huan, O.J. Rojas 8:50 COLL 64. Rapid detection of foodborne pathogens using directional emission from dynamic double emulsion droplets. L. Zeininger, T.M. Swager 9:10 COLL 65. Continuous visualization of complex liquid emulsions using on-chip ring resonators. S. Savagatrup, T.M. Swager 9:30 COLL 66. Modeling of the effect of additives in demulsification of crude oils. D. Yu, J. Mendenhall 9:50 COLL 67. Active demulsification of stable emulsions prepared from mixtures of azobenzene surfactant/SDS using light. Y. Kondo, N. Koizumi, Y. Takahashi 10:10 COLL 68. Creating aqueous metastable amorphous dispersions of hydrophobic naphthalene compounds via the “Ouzo effect”. J.M. Belanger, J. Cirilo, T.M. Reidy 10:30 COLL 69. Influence of microfibrillated cellulose fractions on the rheology of water suspensions: Colloidal interactions and viscoelastic properties. G. Cinar, P.A. Larsson, A. Riazanova, A. Karppinen, H. Øvrebø, L. Berglund, L. Wagberg 10:50 COLL 70. Multiphase water-in-oil emulsion droplets produced via microfluidics as artificial cells. C.D. Crowe, C.D. Keating 11:10 COLL 71. Femtoliter droplet arrays: Formation, dissolution and applications. L. Bao, H. Yu, V. Spandan, D. Lohse, X. Zhang 11:30 COLL 72. Rheology and phase morphology of liquid crystal dispersed silica-core nanoparticles. M. Tukpah, S. Jadhav, R. McKenzie 11:50 COLL 73. Dynamic structural color in reconfigurable complex droplets. A. Goodling, S. Nagelberg, M. Kolle, L.D. Zarzar

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Surface Chemistry Adsorption & Chirality S. L. Tait, Organizer D. L. Patrick, T. K. Wijethunga, Presiding 8:30 COLL 74. Templated growth of a chiral thin film oxide. A. Schilling, E.H. Sykes 8:50 COLL 75. Helical nanoparticle-induced enhancement of molecular optical activity. L. Yang 9:10 COLL 76. Chiral adsorbate assembly in 2D: Racemates or conglomerates. A.J. Gellman, S. Dutta 9:30 COLL 77. Towards understanding and controlling molecular self-assembly. H.D. Castillo, J.M. Espinosa Duran, S. Kim, D. Lee, P. Ortoleva, S.L. Tait 9:50 COLL 78. Quantitatively predicting nanoscale domain morphology in solution-processed organic thin films. D.L. Patrick, G. Reed, L. Bavik, C. Schaaf, B. Johnson 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 COLL 79. Investigating adsorbed films of linear alkanes on solid surfaces: A thermodynamic, modeling, and scattering study. N.A. Strange, T. Arnold, J.Z. Larese 10:50 COLL 80. Adsorption of cycloalkanes on MgO (100), graphite and hexagonal boron nitride: A thermodynamic, modeling and neutron scattering study. F. Wahida, J.Z. Larese 11:10 COLL 81. Application of crystalline substrates for nucleation control and polymorphic selection of Indomethacin. T.K. Wijethunga, X. Chen, A.S. Myerson, B. Trout

Interfacial Chemistry under Nano-scale Confinement Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

SUNDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Advances in Colloid & Surface Chemistry Enabled by Cryogenic & In Situ Liquid-cell Electron Microscopy N. D. Burrows, M. R. Jones, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 84. Physical chemistry of nanocrystals with the graphene liquid cell. P. Alivisatos 2:30 COLL 85. Understanding the growth and dissolution of metal nanoparticles using in situ liquid transmission electron microscopy. H. Yang 3:00 COLL 86. Characterizing formation, growth, dissolution, and transformation of nanocrystals in suspensions. J.A. Soltis, N.D. Burrows, V. Yuwono, S. Kumar, A.M. Vindedahl, K. Sabyrov, R. Penn 3:30 COLL 87. Investigating crystal nucleation, transformation and assembly via liquid and cryogenic TEM. J.J. De Yoreo 4:00 Intermission. 4:15 COLL 88. Visualizing nanoscale assembly and elastocapillary effects in solution using in situ TEM. U. Mirsaidov 4:45 COLL 89. Atomistic modeling of nanoparticle selfassembly in liquid cells and at liquid interfaces. P. Kral 5:05 COLL 90. Cryo-electron microscopy: 2D and 3D visualization of nanobubbles, nanoparticles, and supramolecular assemblies. P.L. Stewart 5:35 COLL 91. Seeing is believing - from crystallizing of nanoparticles to crumpling of polymer films. Q. Chen

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Colloidal & Interfacial Science in Separation Processes Q. Liu, P. Somasundaran, Organizers I. Chernyshova, S. Ponnurangam, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 92. Membranes with controlled 2D MXene lateral flake sizes. Y. Gogotsi 2:30 COLL 93. Gas permeation through Pickering membranes. M.M. Krejca, W. Goedel 2:50 COLL 94. Oxidant-triggered rapid deposition of plantderived phenols on PVDF membrane with ultrahigh water permeability for effective oil/water separation. Y. Chen, Q. Liu 3:10 COLL 95. Enrichment and recovery of mammalian cells from contaminated cultures using aqueous two-phase systems. C.J. Luby, B.P. Coughlin, C. Mace 3:30 COLL 96. Development of nanolignin complexes from lignocellulosic biomass for applications in nanobiotechnology. J. Bhaumik, S. Chandna, R. Kaur, Y. Reddy 3:50 COLL 97. Ranking binding affinity for ssDNA-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) using free energy perturbation (FEP). K. Hinkle, F.R. Phelan 4:20 Intermission. 4:35 COLL 98. Impact of operating conditions in membrane-based separation processes on the characteristics of inorganic scales on membrane surface. O. Lokare, S. Wadekar, R.D. Vidic

131

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

9:50 COLL 39. Ultra-thin zirconium hydroxide films: Characterization of material properties and assessment of chemical activity for chemical warfare simulant decomposition. S. Jeon, R.B. Balow, G.C. Daniels, P.E. Pehrsson 10:10 COLL 40. Nanoparticles mediated chiral separation using SERS. R. Stiufiuc, V. Toma, A. Moldovan, G. Stiufiuc, V. Chis, M. Lucaciu 10:30 COLL 41. Enantiomeric separations of chiral propanolol using chiral tetrahexahedral Au nanoparticles. N. Shukla, D. Yang, A.J. Gellman 10:50 COLL 42. Substrate adhesion force scales nonmonotonically with growth time in millimeter-scale carbon nanotube arrays. A.L. Kaiser, D.L. Rautenbach, S.C. Peterson, L. Acauan, S. Steiner, R. Guzman de Villoria, I.Y. Stein, B.L. Wardle 11:10 COLL 43. Simple bond-centric model for accelerated nanoalloy energetics. M.G. Taylor, Z. Yan, A. Mascareno, G. Mpourmpakis 11:30 COLL 44. Experimental validation of FM-AFM competition in FexZn1-xSe QDs by computational modelling. J.K. Bindra, L. Gutsev, G.F. Strouse, J. van Tol, N.S. Dalal, S. Stoian

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 5:00 COLL 99. Mesoscale simulations of nanoparticle separation on polymer-grafted porous media. A. Vishnyakov, S. Kolattukudy Poulose, A.V. Neimark, Y. Brun 5:20 COLL 100. Fouling behavior of chemically modified mixed liquor from submerged ceramic biofilm-membrane bioreactor. Z. Maletskyi, O. Kulesha 5:40 COLL 101. Effect of inorganic salt as porogen on the structure and properties of polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) membranes. M. Zhang, Y. Song

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Metallic Nanocatalysts H. Fan, Y. Sun, Organizers J. He, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 COLL 102. Synthesis and catalytic applications of Ru nanocrystals with well-controlled facets and an fcc structure. Y. Xia 2:35 COLL 103. Crystal phase-engineering of novel nanomaterials. H. Zhang 3:05 COLL 104. Coordination assemblies of nanoparticles. N. Kotov, Z. Qu, W. Feng, Y. Wang, K. Hirai 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 COLL 105. Atomically precise metal nanoparticles and their assembly. R. Jin 4:20 COLL 106. Probing the atomic arrangement of palladium on silver nanocrystals with an isocyanide-based reporter by surface-enhanced Raman scattering. D. Qin, Y. Wu 4:50 COLL 107. Towards precision catalysts through the control of bimetallic nanostructures. H. Yang

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Heating with Colloidal Nanoparticles: Physical Mechanisms & Applications in Life Science P. del Pino, L. Liz Marzan, W. Parak, Organizers C. Carrillo-Carrión, Presiding 2:00 COLL 108. LeChatelier on the nanoscale. C.J. Murphy 2:30 COLL 109. Controlling biomolecular corona by plasmonic metal nanoparticles. E. Polo 3:00 COLL 110. Low-dose exposure of graphene oxide significantly increases metal toxicity to macrophages by altering their cellular priming state. J. Zhu, S. Liu 3:20 COLL 111. Magnetite nano-clusters for biomedical magnetic nanoparticles fluid hyperthermia for cancer treatment. D. Quesada, L.C. Fernandez, A. Tapanes-Castillo, M. Barreat 3:40 Intermission. 4:10 COLL 112. Vortex state in magnetite nanodiscs: A foundation for multimodal mechanothermal neuronal stimulation. G. Danijela, A.W. Senko, A. Chuvilin, P. Reddy, A. Sankararaman, D. Rosenfeld, F. Garcia, J. Moon, P. Chiang, P. Anikeeva 4:40 COLL 113. Biotransformation of graphene oxide in lung fluids significantly alters its inherent properties and bioactivities towards immune cells. S. Liu 5:10 COLL 114. Radio frequency heating of carbon nanotube loaded materials. M.J. Green, C. Sweeney, M. Saed

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers N. Pradhan, Presiding 2:00 COLL 115. Molecular printing: Combining organic chemistry and nanolithography to recreate biointerfaces. A.B. Braunschweig 2:30 COLL 116. Directed assembly for three-dimensional nanoprinting. G. Liu, S. Wang, J. Ventrici de Souza, Y. Liu, T. Kuhl, P. Doerig, J. Frommer 3:20 COLL 117. Integration of colloidal giant quantum dots and 3D nanoantennas by dip-pen nanolithography. J. Wang, F. Dawood, P. Schulze, C. Sheehan, I. Staude, I. Brener, N.A. Amro, J.A. Hollingsworth 3:40 COLL 118. Direct assembly of hydrophobic quantum dots with colloidal silica via van der Waals interaction. K. Woo, H. Yoo

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4:00 COLL 119. Ligand-mediated structural transformations in PbS nanocrystal superlattices. S.W. Winslow, D. Smilgies, J. Swan, W.A. Tisdale 4:20 COLL 120. Long range hierarchical assembly of Pt nanocrystals – Insights from measurements and molecular simulations of nanoparticle docking. S. Wang, E. Zhu, X. Yan, M. Sobani, L. Ruan, C. Wang, Y. Liu, X. Duan, H. Heinz, Y. Huang 4:40 COLL 121. Fabrication of hierarchically ordered optically active nanocrystal solids by surface passivation using atomic layer deposition of metal oxides. R. Bose, A. Dangerfield, S. Rupich, Y.J. Chabal, A. Malko 5:00 COLL 122. Directed assembly and nano-soldering of multi-segment metallic nanowires. J. Wang, F. Gao, C. Su, J. Su, H. Sun, Z. Gu 5:20 COLL 123. Self-assembly of spatially-decorated metallic nanowires on a fluid interface. G. Staelens, A.M. Jonas, B. Nysten, S. Demoustier-Champagne

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Understanding Nano-Bio Interactions: Implications for Bio-Imaging, Diagnosis & Treatment B. Kim, S. Wilhelm, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 124. Correlating the interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with biological matter with their physicochemical properties. W. Parak 2:30 COLL 125. Structure-function relationships in the development of immunotherapeutic agents. C.A. Mirkin 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 COLL 126. Designer nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and delivery. T.W. Odom 3:40 COLL 127. Improving antitumor immunity through immuno-engineering. M. Goldberg 4:10 Intermission. 4:20 COLL 128. Interactions of amphiphilic ligand-coated gold nanoparticles with cells and tissues from the nano- to macro-scale. D.J. Irvine 4:50 COLL 129. CRISPRed macrophages for cellbased cancer immunotherapy. Y. Lee, M. Ray, J. Hardie, M.E. Farkas, V.M. Rotello 5:10 COLL 130. Multivalent bi-specific nanobioconjugate engager for targeted cancer immunotherapy. C. von Roemeling, H. Yuan, W. Jiang, Y. Qie, X. Liu, Y. Chen, Y. Wang, R. Wharen, K. Yun, G. Bu, K. Knutson, B. Kim 5:30 COLL 131. Engaging nanoparticle-cell interactions through “smart” design. M.R. Mackiewicz

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Clinical Translation G. Han, Z. Wang, J. Xie, Organizers Z. Gu, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 132. Nanoparticulate delivery systems for RNA therapy and genome editing. D.G. Anderson 2:30 COLL 133. Discovery and translation of the cell membrane-coated nanoparticle technology. L. Zhang 3:00 COLL 134. Modified macrophages as cell-based delivery tools and therapeutic entities for cancer. M.E. Farkas 3:20 COLL 135. Overcoming biological barriers for circulation and targeting of nanoparticles. S. Mitragotri 3:50 COLL 136. Tolerogenic nanoparticles for the prevention of anti-drug antibodies - from concept to the clinic. L. Johnston 4:20 COLL 137. Universal and ultrastable mineralization coating bioinspired from bioflims. Y. Xiao 4:40 COLL 138. Adaptive treatment tolerance attenuated by nanotechnique-assisted drug delivery. X. Liang 5:10 COLL 139. Leverage physiology for bioresponsive drug delivery. Z. Gu 5:40 COLL 140. Insulin – containing silica nanoparticles with a high loading capacity and demonstration of bioactivity: Potential for oral delivery. D. Hristov, F. McCartney, J. Beirne, S. Reid, E.A. Mahon, S. Bhattacharjee, G. Redmond, D. Brougham, D.J. Brayden

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues M. A. Ilies, Organizer K. Sakurai, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 COLL 141. Helical polymer structure provides platinum-loaded polymeric micelles with favorable size and stability for effective tumor-targeting. Y. Mochida, H. Cabral, Y. Miura, K. Osada, N. Nishiyama, K. Kataoka 2:30 COLL 142. Photo-targeted nanoparticles for intravenous treatment of choroidal neovascularization. Y. Wang, D.S. Kohane 3:00 COLL 143. Oxidation-responsive nanolayered coatings for the on-demand delivery of therapeutic growth factors. J.R. Martin, M.T. Funkenbusch, S. Wang, P.T. Hammond 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 COLL 144. Increasing nanoparticle drug loading efficiency via self-assembly. M.W. Grinstaff 4:15 COLL 145. Block copolymer nanocarriers with peptide units for drug delivery. M. Klapper, F. Karagoez, N. Wutke 4:45 COLL 146. NIH/NIBIB funding for novel drug delivery technologies. D. Rampulla

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Surface Chemistry Reactivity at Solid Surfaces & Ions at Liquid-Vapor Interfaces S. L. Tait, Organizer D. R. Killelea, T. Thuening, Presiding 2:00 COLL 147. Single-atom alloy catalysts: From theory to working catalysts through surface science characterization. T. Thuening, M. Darby, R. Reocreux, A. Michaelides, M. Stamatakis, E.H. Sykes 2:20 COLL 148. Selective oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde over TiO2/Au(111). A. Baber, D.T. Boyle, J. Wilke, V.H. Lam 2:40 COLL 149. Influence of structure and composition on the surface chemistry of bimetallic Cu/Au model catalysts. C. Baddeley, F. Grillo, R. Megginson, S. Francis 3:00 COLL 150. Comparison of oxygen adsorption and absorption on rhodium, silver, and stepped platinum surfaces. D.R. Killelea, R. Farber, M. Turano, L. Juurlink, E.V. Iski 3:20 COLL 151. Syntheses, plasmonic properties, and catalytic applications of Ag-Rh core-frame nanocubes and Rh nanoboxes with highly porous walls. D. Qin, Y. Zhang 3:40 COLL 152. Surface chemistry of gold islands deposited on TiO2(110). R. Somaratne, J.E. Whitten 4:00 Intermission. 4:20 COLL 153. Hydration mediated interfacial transitions on mixed hydrophobic/hydrophilic nanodroplet interfaces. F. Kovacik, H. Okur, S. Roke 4:40 COLL 154. Molecular insight into the carboxylic acid – alkali metal cations interactions: Reversed affinity and ion pair formation. A.P. Stho*r, J. Hladilková, M. Lund, E. Tyrode 5:00 COLL 155. Surface properties of hypobromite at the liquid-vapor interface studied by liquid jet XPS. S. Chen, L. Artiglia, F. Orlando, X. Kong, P. Arroyo, M. Ammann

Moving the Safety Values of the ACS Forward Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CA, CARB, CCS, CHAS‡, CINF, COLL, CPT, ENFL, ENVR, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Interfacial Chemistry under Nano-scale Confinement Sponsored by GEOC, Cosponsored by COLL

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

SUNDAY EVENING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces Posters A. P. Goodwin, V. Gordon, Organizers

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Colloid & Surface Chemistry in Industry: Applications & Career Opportunities Posters H. Fairbrother, N. A. Falk, L. Tribe, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 COLL 160. pH mediated cell uptake of alkyl carboxylate functionalized Qβ VLPs. H. Lee, J.J. Gassensmith COLL 161. Modeling of magnetization in self-assembled magnetic nanocubes. F. Sanoj COLL 162. Crystallite-size dependent bond length, elastic and thermal properties of nano-oxides. S. Chan COLL 163. Synthesis and characterization of self-assembled peptide nanotubes: Scaffolds for neural cell differentiation. P. Macha, L. Perreault, M. Vasudev, M. Mayes COLL 164. Peptide-based carriers for natural therapeutic molecules delivery. Y. Hamedani, M. Vasudev

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Fundamental Research in Colloids, Surfaces & Nanomaterials R. Nagarajan, Organizer 5:30 – 7:30 COLL 165. 3D chiral microbuckles fabricated by asymmetric biaxial stretching. M. Hwang, C. Kim, A. Jung, B. Kim, B. Yeom COLL 166. 64Cu chelation-enabled multimodal imaging of porphyrin-lipid micro and nanobubble shell fate: Applications in therapeutic ultrasound. M. Rajora, J. Chen, G. Zheng COLL 167. Study on changing rule of colloidal system properties in thermal cracking reactions. J. Li COLL 168. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions containing poly-(acrylic acid) and non-ionic surfactant: A comparative study between pentaethylene glycol n-octyl ether (C8E5) and octaethylene glycol n-decyl ether (C10E8). L. Kunche, U. Natarajan COLL 169. Evolution of bioinspired self-assembled materials in nucleic acid therapeutics and vaccines. M. Gindy, A. Bett, G. Swaminathan, J. Smith, S. Secore, A. Latham, M. Patel COLL 170. High resolution nanoparticle sizing with Maximum A posteriori nanoparticle tracking analysis (MANTA). K. Silmore, X. Gong, M. Strano, J. Swan COLL 171. Particle size distribution of food additives: Silicon dioxide study. S.A. Khan, T.R. Croley COLL 172. Particle sizing of a food supplement in response to an EFSA request for characterization of potential nanomaterials. R.I. Maccuspie COLL 173. General way to synthesize Sm-based nanomagnet. B. Shen, S. Sun COLL 174. Cation distribution in composite quantum dots prepared by partial cation exchange. C. Lin, S.E. Benjamin, H.D. Hall, M.L. Ary, X.A. Aguilar, J.W. Campbell, P.G. Van Patten COLL 175. New method of comparing photocatalysts by identifying reaction intermediates. M. Croxall, M. Goh COLL 176. Acceleration of photoisomerization reaction of lophine dimers with inner environment of the micelles. M. Akamatsu, K. Kobayashi, T. Suzuki, K. Sakai, H. Sakai COLL 177. Adsorption of amino acids onto TiO2 nanoparticles: Towards understanding nano–bio interactions. N.I. Gonzalez Pech, I. Ustunol, H. Wu, B. Kenney, V.H. Grassian COLL 178. Affinity chromatography measurements of metal ion binding to lipid membranes. E.E. Ross

COLL 179. Aggregation process of amyloidogenic peptides coated nano-gold colloidal particles. I. Deshmukh, J. Lippa, K. Yokoyama COLL 180. Amino acid hom*ology of peptide sequence as a determining factor in single pot reduction of Au nanoparticles. C.J. Munro, M.R. Knecht COLL 181. Efficient route to amine functionalized siloxy gels. B.P. Chauhan, G. Longia COLL 182. Analyzing the roles of surfactant mixtures containing aromatic additives and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride in the synthesis of gold nanorods. I.W. Guo, B.D. Gates COLL 183. Antimicrobial carbohydrate-passivated gold nanoclusters. W. Ndugire, M. Yan COLL 184. Application of gold-silica core-shell nanostructures to treat gliobastoma associated with NHE9 overexpression. L. Juratli, S. Nasser, A. Pall, K.C. Kondapalli, K. Bandyopadhyay COLL 185. Atomic resolution 3D reconstruction of single colloidal nanoparticle. J. Heo, B. Kim, S. Kim, J. Park COLL 186. Biodegradable tetra-block copolymeric nanoparticles for MS1 anti-cancer peptide delivery. N. Mehrotra, D. Gupta, S. Kharbanda, H. Singh COLL 187. Bio-functionalization of graphene oxide for antimicrobial and drug delivery applications. I.A. Banerjee, M. Hugo, K.R. Fath COLL 188. Biopolymer functionalized liposomes for enhanced disperison stability of nanovesicles. L. Hyppolite, C. Winstead Casson COLL 189. Blood protein interaction with nanostructured glycocalyx mimetic surfaces. M. Hedayati, M.M. Reynolds, D. Krapf, M. Kipper COLL 190. Characterization of surface chemical processes during the leaching of silver from a polymetallic sulfide by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and polarization microscopy. D. Silva Quiñones, J.C. Rodriguez-Reyes, A.V. Teplyakov, R. He COLL 191. Characterization of the antibacterial efficiency of metal nanoparticle-infused composite materials using epi-fluorescent optical trapping. T.J. Beckmann, D.M. Danhausen, J.J. Keleher COLL 192. Characterizing solid electrolyte interphase-layer formation using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in solidstate Mg-ion batteries. H.K. Henry, S. Lee COLL 193. Charge switchable nanozymes for imaging of biofilm-associated infections. A. Gupta, R. Das, G. Yesilbag Tonga, T. Mizuhara, V.M. Rotello COLL 194. Chemical and structural analysis on the surface of quantum rods. Y. Chen, E.G. Ripka, M.M. Maye COLL 195. Chemical environment of iron and nickel atoms in thin film magnets. K. Kaur, S. Dehipawala, P. Samarasekara COLL 196. Click chemistry for loading a synthetic peptide (VIHGW-(alkyne)-G-NH2) onto functionalized silver nanoparticles and its antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. M.R. Gakiya, L. Palomino, S. Pierce, A.M. Angeles Boza, J.C. Rodriguez-Reyes COLL 197. Coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations of rosette nanotubes using the MARTINI forcefield. V. Karra, F.R. Hung, H. Fenniri COLL 198. CsPbX3 ligand binding dynamics: A 2D diffusion and relaxation NMR study. E.G. Ripka, C.R. Deschene, M.M. Maye COLL 199. Cytosolic siRNA delivery using nanoparticlestabilized nanocapsules for in vivo anti-inflammatory therapy. Y. Liu, Y. Jiang, J. Hardie, R. Das, R. Landis, V.M. Rotello COLL 200. Dense suspension rheology studies of attractive nanoemulsions for characterization of polymer chain conformation-driven dipolar interdrop association. J. Lee, M. Sung, K. Shin, J. Kim, S. Hong, J. Kim COLL 201. Dermal-epidermal junction-targeted transdermal delivery using squashy, skin-adhesive polymeric nanovehicles. S. Hong, J. Park, J. Kim, J. Lee, H. Lee, J. Kim COLL 202. Design of nickel nanoparticles for X-ray fluorescence microscopy to visualize cellular metal ion concentrations. H. Sawab, M.R. Mackiewicz COLL 203. Determination of permethrin level on military uniform fabrics using desorption-gas chromatography– mass spectrometry. J.B. Sennett, R.A. Pesce-Rodriguez, A.A. Bujanda, L.B. Blaudeau COLL 204. Developing the sapphire (0001) surface as a transparent substitute for mica for DNA nanostructure imaging. M.L. Norton, M. Rahman, D. Neff, Z.T. Boggs COLL 205. Development of nucleic acid delivery system targeting Ras gene by β-glucan. S. Sasaki, N. Fujiwara, H. Izumi, K. Sakurai, S. Mochizuki

COLL 206. Development of tumor-specific double-stranded RNA delivery system using hyaluronic acid. M. Umeda, S. Mochizuki COLL 207. Diatom-inspired silica nanoparticle coatings using an engineered mussel glue to accelerate bone growth on titanium-based implants. Y. Jo, B. Choi, C. Kim, H.J. Cha COLL 208. Direct cytosolic co-delivery of siRNA and tamoxifen for enhanced breast cancer therapy. J. Hardie, Y. Jiang, E. Tetrault, P. Ghazi, G. Yesilbag Tonga, M.E. Farkas, V.M. Rotello COLL 209. Direct, in situ visualization of graphene reaction dynamics via optical microscopy. W. Li, M. Wojcik, Y. Li, K. Xu COLL 210. Dynamic double emulsions generated via in situ surfactant synthesis. C.A. Zentner, T.M. Swager COLL 211. Effective removal of surface-bound cetyltrimethylammonium ions from PEG-protected Au nanorods by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide/citric acid. H. Kawasaki, R. Arakawa COLL 212. Effects of ALD layers on magnesium anode interface chemistry. E. Sahadeo, C. Lin, G. Rubloff, S. Lee COLL 213. Effects of antifreeze proteins and their hyperactive mutants on calcite crystallization. A. Kishish*ta, J.J. Lugo, F. Rojas, J.O. Castellon, X. Wen COLL 214. Encapsulation of plasmid DNA by cationic nanocarriers for cellular uptake by microspores. J. Cho, P. Bhowmik, S. Dodard, P. Polowick, G. Nowak, H. Fenniri, U. Hemraz COLL 215. Engineered antibacterial nanosurfaces for field hospitals. J.W. Moxley, T. Webster COLL 216. Engineering immune cell-derived hybrid exosomes for tumor-targeted drug delivery. S. Rayamajhi, T. Nguyen, A. Eliyapura, R. Marasni, S. Aryal COLL 217. Engineering the magnetic permeability in magnetic nanoparticles using dendritic ligands. J.D. Lee, D. Jishkariani, H. Yun, T. Paik, J.M. Kikkawa, C.R. Kagan, B. Donnio, C.B. Murray COLL 218. Engineering the titania nanostructure to optimize visible light-driven antimicrobial properties. S. Wickramasinghe, Z. Jiang, X. Yu, A.C. Samia COLL 219. Enhanced charge separation in nitrogendoped graphene quantum dots/graphitic C3N4 lateral heterostructures for photocatalytic H2 evolution. K. Yu, M. Goh COLL 220. Enzyme-polymer-cellulose colloids: Enzymes interlocked in the fibrous matrix of cellulose with enhanced stability while preserving activities. C. Riccardi, C.V. Kumar, R. Kasi COLL 221. Fabrication of 1D photoreflective multilayered films by layer-by-layer assembly and transfer method. A. Jung, N. Ha, M. Hwang, B. Kim, B. Yeom COLL 222. Fabrication of drug-eluting coatings by harnessing electrostatic interactions with native protein films. S. Gopalakrishnan, L. Wang, Y. Lee, V.M. Rotello COLL 223. Facile synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles using atmospheric-pressure microplasmas. L. Ching Yu COLL 224. Fast dopant migration in Mn:CdS/CdZnS/ZnS core/shell/shell quantum dots. E. Hofman, Z. Li, A.H. Davis, W. Zheng COLL 225. Functionalized nanodiamonds in the investigation of aggregation phenomena. L. Lott, C. Winstead Casson COLL 226. Generation of anisotropic gold and Au-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles on functionalized surfaces. V. Gerios, A. Peer, K. Bandyopadhyay COLL 227. Highly anisotropic PtCu alloy nanoframes used as efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. X. Cui, Z. Zhang, H. Zhang COLL 228. High-performance shear thickening behavior of a colloidal suspension of core-shell structure particles originated by inter-particle hydrogen bonding. H. Son, K. Kim, J. Kim, K. Yoon, Y. Lee, H. Paik COLL 229. Hollow particles templated from Pickering emulsion and its application in coating shrinkage reduction. X. Wang, G. Sun, R. Liu COLL 230. Impact of interfacial and bulk interactions between novel amphiphilic hydroxypropyl cellulose derivatives and bile salts on lipid digestion. J. Zornjak, D. Novo, K.J. Edgar, C. Fernandez Fraguas COLL 231. In vivo antitumor effect of anti-Mammaglobin-A antibody conjugated to (-)-epicatechin loaded chitosan nanoparticles in a murine model of breast cancer. A. Perez Ruiz, I. Olivares Corichi, F. Ganem Rondero, J. García Sánchez COLL 232. In vivo gene editing in mice through systemic delivery of CRISPR/Cas9-ribonucleoprotein. Y. Lee, D. Luther, Y. Liu, L. Castellanos, J. Hardie, R.W. Vachet, V.M. Rotello

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

5:30 – 7:30 COLL 156. Using assembly of a chromonic mesogen to enable isolation and ligand-receptor binding studies of bacterial pilin protein. A. Ibanez, Y.Y. Luk COLL 157. Trapping of antibacterial agents within hydrophobic films of polyphosphazene polyelectrolytes. V. Albright, H. Hlushko, H. Nelson, C. Co, S. Armbrister, S. Hernandez, M. Andreo, A. Jayaraman, A. Marin, A.K. Andrianov, S.A. Sukhishvili COLL 158. Engineered functional amyloids as bionanomaterials: A synthetic biology approach. E. Sahin Kehribar, M.E. Isilak, E. Kalyoncu, U. Seker COLL 159. Fluorescent single protein nanoparticles with dimensions controlled at angstrom resolution and improved thermal stability. J. Ding, J. He, C.V. Kumar

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL COLL 233. Infiltration and crystallization behavior of calcium carbonate precursor formulations in porous materials. A.M. Hoyt, H. Cölfen COLL 234. In-situ electron diffraction tracking fast oxidation of nickel nanoparticles at ambient pressure. Y. Jian, X. Zhang, Y. Wang, Y. Wang COLL 235. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with epidermal growth factor (EGF) in physiological media: Evaluation for their potential use in systems that improve the regeneration of epithelial tissues. L. Palomino, S. Carney, M.R. Gakiya, A. Camardo, A. Ramamurthi, J.C. Rodriguez-Reyes COLL 236. Investigating the impact of nanoparticle shape on single nanocrystal photophysics. J.J. Peterson, B. Mehlenbacher COLL 237. Investigation of selective growth of ALD alumina on functionalized HOPG surfaces. M. Trought, I. Wentworth, T.R. Leftwich, K.A. Perrine COLL 238. Kinetic study of the adsorption of methylene blue onto chitosan: Evidence for non-Arrhenius behavior. A.H. Pinto, J. Kellner-Rogers COLL 239. Kinetics of amino acid induced aggregation of silver nanoparticles. K.I. Peterson, J. Smith, D.P. Pullman COLL 240. Kitchen Chemistry 102: Exfoliation of alphazirconium phosphate with proteins in a blender as an alternative to exfoliation by tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide. M. Malhotra, C.L. Baveghems, C.V. Kumar COLL 241. Laundering study of current and future FRACU (Flame-Resistant Army Combat Uniform) candidates. P. Yip COLL 242. Long range interaction between corannulene molecules on (111) surface of noble metals. X. Wen, K. Wu COLL 243. Magneto/plasmonic nanoliposomes for drug delivery applications: Synthesis and characterization. G. Stiufiuc, S. Nitica, V. Toma, A. Moldovan, C. Iacovita, M. Lucaciu, R. Stiufiuc COLL 244. Management of gold nanorod synthesis with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) of different molecular weights in minor concentration. K.I. Requejo Roque, A. Liopo, E. Zubarev COLL 245. Manganese doped two-dimensional CdS/ZnS core/shell nanoplatelets. A.H. Davis, W. Zheng, E. Hofman, K. Chen COLL 246. Detection of the onset of aggregation as a function of pH of iron oxide nanopowder by dynamic light scattering. L. Szwast COLL 247. Measurement of carbon black particle size using a disc centrifuge photosedimentometer. L. Szwast COLL 248. Measurement of graphene particle size using laser obscuration time technique. L. Szwast COLL 249. Measurement of water partial molar volume in Aerosol-OT reverse micelles via microscopic imaging of the liquid surface. C. Gallis, Z. Rickard, J.C. Deak COLL 250. Mesoporous graphene oxide-zeolite composites for efficient dye removals. Y. Chang, Y. Chou, Z. Dai, Y. Yeh, Y. Liu COLL 251. Micellar water characterization: A laser light scattering application. D. Castro COLL 252. Modeling of nanoparticle immersion and selfassembly at liquid-air interfaces. T.T. Nitka, L. Vukovic COLL 253. Multicolored protein colloidal particles: Rational methods to enhance their photostabilities. M. Limbacher, B.S. Stromer, J. Waldman, C.V. Kumar COLL 254. Multigram synthesis of Cu-Ag nanowires and its application in 3D printing. M.A. Cruz, B.J. Wiley COLL 255. Multimicrometer noncovalent monolayer domains on layered materials through thermally controlled Langmuir−Schaefer conversion for noncovalent 2D functionalization. T.R. Hayes, J. Bang, T.C. Davis, C.F. Peterson, D.G. McMillan, S.A. Claridge COLL 256. Multi-stimuli responsive Pickering emulsion based on coumarin surfactants and silica nanoparticles. Y. Shijie, J. Jiang, Z. Cui COLL 257. Multi-stimuli responsive wormlike micelles based on conventional surfactants. Q. Xu, J. Jiang, Z. Cui COLL 258. Nanofibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning, rotary-jet spinning and airbrush for orthopedic tissue regeneration. P. Ghannadian, J.W. Moxley, M. De Paula, T.J. Webster COLL 259. Nanogels of hyaluronic acid bi-modified with epigallocatechin-3-gallate and curcumin: Potent nanoinhibitor on amyloid β-protein aggregation and cytotoxicity. Z. Jiang, X. Dong, Y. Sun COLL 260. Nanozymes for controlling localization and kinetics of bio-orthogonal reactions. R. Das, G.Y. Tonga, R.F. Landis, P. Puangploy, M. Knapp, V.M. Rotello COLL 261. New approach of synthesizing anisotropic iron oxide nanoparticles with enhanced T2 relaxation for MRI applications. S. Wickramasinghe, S.F. Situ, E.C. Abenojar, B.O. Erokwu, C.A. Flask, Z. Lee, A.C. Samia

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COLL 262. New nanocomposites of silicon polymers and noble metal nanoparticles for applications in 3D printing. B.P. Chauhan, N. Ampomah, K. Moran, Q. Johnson COLL 263. Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots/TiO2 composite for photocatalysis. R. Lawrence, M. Goh COLL 264. Novel synthetic method of chitosan functionalized liposomes as an innovative nanocarrier for chemotherapeutic drugs. L. Hyppolite COLL 265. On the shuttling mechanism of a chlorine atom in a chloroaluminum phthalocyanine based molecular switch. H. Song, H. Zhu, K. Wu COLL 266. Organic solvent dispersion of two-dimensional titanium carbide by the surface functionalization. D. Kim, C. Koo, S. Cho COLL 267. Outstanding radical scavenging of transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets via defect-mediated one-step hydrogen atom transfer in aqueous media. J. Kim, J. Lee, S. Hong, J. Kim COLL 268. Pegylation of β-cyclodextrin for increased water solubility and biocompatibility in drug delivery applications. K.T. Nguyen, R. Manasi, L. Rodriguez, Y. Ba COLL 269. Photoinduced metallic particle growth on single crystal relaxor ferroelectric strontium barium niobate. E. Barnes, E. Alberts, L.C. Mimun, J. Brame, C. Warner, A.R. Harmon, A.R. Poda COLL 270. Polymeric nanoassemblies for direct delivery of active therapeutic proteins. D.C. Luther, Y. Lee, F. Scaletti, R. Landis, V.D. Chaplin, M. Mingroni, L. Wang, M. Ray, R. Mout, V.M. Rotello COLL 271. Polymeric pH-activated nanoparticles for lipotoxic cell application. K. Lopes, J. Zeng, M.W. Grinstaff COLL 272. Predominated thermodynamically controlled reactions for suppressing cross nucleations in formation of multinary substituted tetrahedrite nanocrystals. S. Bera COLL 273. Preparation of flexible silver-colored organic crystals. K. Yamada, Y. Takahashi, Y. Kondo COLL 274. Probe aggregation into the interfaces between mimicking raft and non-raft domains, induced by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) duplexes. Y. Oka COLL 275. Production of bimetallic nanoparticles in vapor phase. N. Sakono, K. Omori, K. Yamamoto COLL 276. Production of golden luster by mixing an azobenzene derivative with liquid crystals. K. f*ckushima, Y. Takahashi, Y. Kondo COLL 277. Programmable DNA nanoparticle: Self-assemblly of pH-triggered nucleic acid ion complex. N. Miyamoto, Y. Kitade COLL 278. Protein-polymer colloids: 17-fold enhanced activities of cytochrome c conjugated with poly(acrylic acid). K.R. Benson, J. Gorecki, A. Nikiforov, R. Kasi, Y. Lin, C.V. Kumar COLL 279. QCM-D and spectroscopic study of cholesteric liquid crystals for temperature-responsive materials. K. Swana, P. D’Angelo, S. Levit, R. Stwodah, M. Gillard, C. Tang COLL 280. Rapid and scalable synthesis of sub-10 nm metal nanoparticles in on-the-fly aerosols. Y. Yang, P. Ghildiyal, M.R. Zachariah COLL 281. Role of slurry chemistry on the nanoparticle redox behavior relevant to the shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical planarization process. T. Zubi, C. Saucedo, K. Wortman-Otto, C. Graverson, J.J. Keleher COLL 282. Seedless, one-pot synthesis of infrared-absorbing silver nanoparticles. N. Yamamoto, D.P. Pullman COLL 283. Self-healing, antibacterial host-guest coating doped nanoparticles. L. Ge COLL 284. Self-propelled water based organo-silanes on glass. M. Vasei, S. Poirier COLL 285. Silica modified candle soot layer-based SERS substrates for the ultrasensitive detection of biological molecules. W. Qian COLL 286. Single-particle tracking for the routine characterization of polydisperse nanoparticle solutions. X. Gong, M. Park, K. Silmore, D. Parviz, T. Lew, M. Strano COLL 287. Solution synthesis of rectangular copper nanotubes and gold nanohelices. Y. Chang, Y. Chang COLL 288. Solution-based crystal phase engineering of noble metal nanostructures. Y. Chen, Z. Fan, H. Zhang COLL 289. Steering DBPET porous networks by the co-play σ-hole interactions of Br```S & Br```Br. L. Xing, Z. Huang, K. Wu COLL 290. Study of the influence of pH and ionic strength on the stability of melamine formaldehyde (MF) resin by field flow fractionation technique. L. Farmakis, J. Kapolos, A. Koliadima

COLL 291. Successive ultraviolet irradiation of mixed monolayers removes molecules and re-orders self-assembled domains. C. Gerber, R. Quardokus COLL 292. Supramolecular assembly onto polymersupported Au monolayers fabricated via chemical lift-off lithography. G.A. Vinnacombe, K.M. Cheung, G.E. Kunkel, A.E. Trojniak, A. VanZanten, M.E. Anderson, P.S. Weiss COLL 293. Surface chemistry and spectroscopy study of α-synuclein and the NAC part. O. Olaluwoye, S. Alrashdi, R. Castillo, C. Wang COLL 294. Surface engineering of graphene materials for advancing antimicrobial performance. W. Kim, J. Son, H. Cho, S. Kim, J.S. Jeon, E. Cho COLL 295. Surface functionalization of catanionic SDBS/ CTAT vesicles. M. Hurley, P. Zayka, E. Holt, N. Soto, E. Robinson, P.R. DeShong COLL 296. Sustainable glucose oxidation with enzymatic magnetically recoverable catalysts. B. Lawson, E. Golikova, A. Sulman, B.D. Stein, N. Lakina, A. Karpenkov, E. Sulman, V. Matveeva, L. Bronstein COLL 297. Synergistic nanosponge-antibiotic therapy for the treatment of biofilm associated infections. C. Li, X. Chen, R. Landis, A. Gupta, J.M. Makabenta, V.M. Rotello COLL 298. Synthesis and characterization of compositioncontrollable platinum-copper-cobalt nanoalloy catalysts. D. Caracciolo, D.M. Adrion, S. Shan, R. Robinson, J. Luo, C. Zhong COLL 299. Synthesis and evaluation of polyglycerol carbonate/polyester blend nanocarriers for pacl*taxel delivery. R. Sabatelle, I. Ekladious, N. Varongchayakul, C. Bordeianu, Y.L. Colson, M.W. Grinstaff COLL 300. Synthesis and properties of surface functional hyperbranched polymer nanoparticles. Y. Lee, B. An COLL 301. Synthesis and self-assembly of magnetoplasmonic nanoparticles. D. Lu COLL 302. Synthesis of alkanethiolate-capped palladium nanoparticles through reversed alkyl thiosulfate addition to control core size & tune surface ligand density. K.M. Vargas, K. San, Y. Shon COLL 303. Synthesis of composition tunable platinum-based ternary nanoalloy catalysts for fuel cell applications. Z. Wu, E. Hopkins, K. Park, S. Yan, J. Wang, J. Wen, J. Luo, L. Wang, C. Zhong COLL 304. Synthesis of eco-friendly biosurfactants from vegetable oils and characterization of interfacial properties for cosmetics and household products. D. Yea, S. Jo, J. Lim COLL 305. Synthesis of high quality bio-graphene suspensions in water for use in a nyctinastic radiator for outer space solar arrays. M.K. Puglia, M. O’Neill, C.V. Kumar COLL 306. Synthesis of mesoporous silica decorated with titania nanoparticles and their photocatalytic activities. B. Kim, A. Jung, M. Hwang, B. Yeom COLL 307. Synthesis, characterization and potential applications of nanoparticles based on naturally-occurring polymers. O. Kvak, M. Goh COLL 308. Synthesis, self-assembly and gelation studies of ninhydrin based unnatural α-amino acids as low molecular mass gelators. F. Zerin, J. Sloop, A.V. Mallia COLL 309. Targeted gene regulation by an enzyme degradable nucleic acid nanocapsule. A. Hartmann, D. Cairns-Gibson, H. Barber, J.L. Rouge COLL 310. Assessment of bacterial interactions with surfaces through the estimation of the adsorption free energy. N. Kotoulas, M. Goh COLL 311. Highly reproducible and eco-friendly synthesis and characterization of silver nanocrystals and their potential anticancer therapeutic properties. D. LomeliMarroquin, R. Rangel-López, A. Nieto Arguello, D. ZárateTriviño, J. Cholula-Díaz COLL 312. Thermodynamics of DNA looping for origami folding. J.M. Majikes, D. Schiffels, M. Zwolak, S.P. Forry, J.A. Liddle COLL 313. Tuning properties of a family of azo-cholesterol liquid crystals for application as photo-controllable reaction media. V. Chang, C. Li, C.J. Barrett COLL 314. Tuning the surface architecture of silver nanoparticles for use as anti-viral agents. H. Wu, D. Demchenko, K.M. Stedman, M.R. Mackiewicz COLL 315. Ullmann-like surface reactions and self-assembly of dibromobenzenes and dibromo-bithiophenes. M. Wolf, R. Quardokus COLL 316. Ultrathin PdCu alloy nanosheets for highly efficient electrocatalytic formic acid oxidation. H. Cheng, N. Yang, H. Zhang COLL 317. Understanding nanoparticle growth mechanism with liquid cell TEM and computational analysis. J. Kim, B. Kim, J. Park

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Nanomaterials Posters J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 COLL 321. Measurement of Escherichia coli using hemoglobin-capped fluorescent gold nanoclusters. S. Tan, X. Pan, J. Kuo, T. Chang, K. Chen, T. Kuo COLL 322. Geometric and optical transformation of a supramolecular host-guest amphiphile. C. Lo, J. Tian, W. Lindemann, J. Ortony COLL 323. 2D materials confined water. Q. Li COLL 324. Laser pulse induced growth of unaggregated Sub-5 nm metal nanoparticles in free-standing graphene films. Y. Yang, D.J. Kline, P. Ghildiyal, M.R. Zachariah COLL 325. Mechanism of osteocalcin interactions with hydroxyapatite surfaces and hydrogen phosphate precursors for bone mineralization. M. Tavakol, S. Hoff, J. Liu, H. Heinz COLL 326. Modulation of mechanical properties of organic cocrystals and crystal designing: Impacts of isostructural and polymorphic functional groups. K.K. Ray, S.M. Oburn, K.M. Hutchins, T.P. Rupasinghe, D.C. Swenson, L. MacGillivray, A.V. Tivanski COLL 327. Fabrication of monodisperse polymerc microparticles coated with silica through droplet based microfluidic system. D. Kim, S. Jin, S. Jeong, B. Lee, K. Kang, C. Lee

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Posters Z. Gu, G. Han, Z. Wang, J. Xie, J. Zheng, Organizers 5:30 – 7:30 COLL 328. Surface-ligand effect on radiosensitization of ultrasmall luminescent gold nanoparticles. X. Jiang COLL 329. Using atomic force microscopy to evaluate ligand-mediated stabilization of EGaIn liquid metal nanoparticles. S.S. Akhter, K. Dinyaryan, M.C. Foster COLL 330. Room-temperature ionic liquid based nanoemulsions: Synthesis and formulation for delivery of poorly water soluble active pharmaceutical agents. M.M. Esson, S. Mecozzi COLL 331. Mechanically tunable inter-bonding, assembly and macrostructures of nanoparticles in biominerals. Z.R. Tian, L. Hua COLL 332. Development of novel nanostructured pharmaceuticals to enhance solubility and overall biological performance. R.V. Jones, E. Manek, F. Darvas

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall A

Surface Chemistry Posters S. L. Tait, Organizer 5:30 – 7:30 COLL 333. Comparing macrocycle assembly at surfaces and in solution: 2D stacking and 3D packing. H.D. Castillo, J.M. Espinosa Duran, J. Dobscha, S. Debnath, J. Yang, Y. Sereda, K. Raghavachari, A.H. Flood, P. Ortoleva, S.L. Tait COLL 334. Preparation of fabrics with directional watertransport property. L. Lao, D. Shou, Y. Wu, J. Fan COLL 335. Wax patterning on flexible plastics for biomedical, microfluidic and electrochemical applications. A.Z. Qamar, S. Chen, K. Amar, P. Kohli, F. Chowdhury, M. Shamsi COLL 336. Transitioning to the field: Operando effects on chemical warfare agent decontamination with zirconium hydroxide. R. Balow, G.C. Daniels, M.L. McEntee, W.O. Gordon, G. Peterson, J.H. Wynne, P.E. Pehrsson

COLL 337. Quantum mechanical derived description of physical adsorption. J.B. Condon COLL 338. Molecular detection and analysis of exosomes using surface-enhanced Raman scattering gold nanorods and a miniaturized device. E. Kwizera, X. Huang, R.T. O’Connor

MONDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces Engineering the Interface A. P. Goodwin, V. Gordon, Organizers W. Shields, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 339. Interfacial structuring of chitosan hydrogel provide enhanced wear protection. X. Banquy, J. Faivre, G. Sudre, A. Montembault, S. Benayoun, T. Delair, L. David 8:55 COLL 340. Mussel-inspired cellulose nanocomposite tough hydrogels with synergistic self-healing, adhesive and strain sensitive properties. C. Shao 9:15 COLL 341. Glycocalyx mimetic surfaces reduce blood protein adsorption and fibrin polymerization. M. Hedayati, M.M. Reynolds, D. Krapf, M. Kipper 9:35 COLL 342. Synergistic action of hyaluronic acid and lubricin prevents surface adhesion in articular joints. H. Ye, R. Su, W. Greene, R. Huang, W. Qi, Z. He 9:55 COLL 343. Enhancing and tuning the lectin binding behavior by functionalization of gold nanoparticles with precision glycomacromolecules. S. Boden, K. Wagner, M. Karg, L. Hartmann 10:15 Intermission. 10:35 COLL 344. Interfacing electron transfer proficient cells with metal surfaces using DNA. A.L. Furst, M.B. Francis 10:55 COLL 345. Ladderane phospholipids form dense, low-polarity membranes with low proton/hydroxide permeability. F.R. Moss, S. Shuken, J. Mercer, C. Cohen, T. Weiss, N.Z. Burns, S.G. Boxer 11:15 COLL 346. Tetrazine ligation-mediated layer-by-layer deposition for the development of antifibrotic patches. H. Zhang, A. Ravikrishnan, X. Jia, J.M. Fox 11:35 COLL 347. Supramolecular surfaces for protein immobilisation. G. Di Palma, P. Mendes

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Colloidal & Interfacial Science in Separation Processes S. Ponnurangam, P. Somasundaran, Organizers I. Chernyshova, Q. Liu, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 348. Metal – modified hydroxyapatites and their affinities for ions and molecules in solution. S. Alexandratos, A. Ashfaq, H. Benhaim, M. Kotlyar, R. Yeahia 9:00 COLL 349. Design of batch, semi-batch, and continuous reactor through superhydrophobic filter. H. Hu, M. Lehtinen, G. Liu 9:25 COLL 350. Tunable and repeatable dye adsorption/ desorption via organosilica nanoparticles with an intrinsic amine. F. Chen, E. Zhao, J.V. Jokerst 9:45 COLL 351. Effect of crystallite-size on the physical and chemical properties of nano-oxides. S. Chan 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 COLL 352. Encapsulation of nanoscale hybrid materials for innovative CO2 capture. W. Yu, M. Gao, A.A. Park 10:50 COLL 353. Nanocomposite foam involving boron nitride nanoplatelets and polycaprolactone: Porous structures for oil spill cleanup. L. Zhang, X. Tantai 11:10 COLL 354. Chiral selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. R.C. Chapleski, S. Roy

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Nanocatalysis for Renewable Energy H. Fan, Y. Sun, Organizers J. He, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 355. Nanoparticle electrocatalysts for chemical valorization of carbon dioxide. P. Yang, D. Kim

9:05 COLL 356. Tuning catalytic activity in bimetallic transition metal phosphides via composition control. S.I. Mutinda, D.M. Liyanage, D. Li, S.L. Brock 9:35 COLL 357. Interfacial engineering in two-dimensional nanomaterials for electrochemical/photoelectrochemical water splitting. X. Feng 10:05 Intermission. 10:20 COLL 358. Designing nanoparticle/electrolyte interfaces for dye-sensitized solar fuels. Y. Wu 10:50 COLL 359. Sequential partial cation exchange reactions as a pathway to complex heterostructured nanoparticle libraries. J.L. Fenton, B. Steimle, R.E. Schaak 11:20 COLL 360. Cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals for designing tandem architectures. V. Ravi, R. Scheidt, P.V. Kamat 11:50 COLL 361. Nanocatalysts for green fuel production. H. Zeng

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Heating with Colloidal Nanoparticles: Physical Mechanisms & Applications in Life Science P. del Pino, L. Liz Marzan, W. Parak, Organizers S. Carregal-Romero, Presiding 8:30 COLL 362. Thermoplasmonics: Fundamentals and application to targeted hyperthermia. R. Quidant 9:00 COLL 363. Photothermal-driven drug-delivery nanoplatform based on plasmonic zeolitic imidazolate frameworks. C. Carrillo Carrion, P. del Pino 9:30 COLL 364. Luminescent nanoparticles to optically monitor plasmonic heating within the biological windows. M. Quintanilla, I. García, I. de Lázaro del Rey, S. Vranic, A. Sánchez-Iglesias, K. Kostarelos, L. Liz Marzan 10:00 Intermission. 10:30 COLL 365. Nanomaterials for cell tracking applications - How to enhance the contrast. N. Feliu, W. Parak 11:00 COLL 366. Stem cells transporting gold nanorods. J.M. Berlin 11:30 COLL 367. Heparin and clotting time measurements via photoacoustic imaging and a silica-nanoparticle/ hydrogel hybrid. J. Wang, F. Chen, S. Arconada, J.V. Jokerst

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials R. Nagarajan, Organizer J. A. Hollingsworth, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 368. N- and P-doping of colloidal nanocrystal and nanowire assemblies. C.R. Kagan 9:00 COLL 369. To dope semiconductor nanocrystals: Chalcogenides to perovskites. N. Pradhan 9:30 COLL 370. Hybrid materials based on colloidal nanocrystals: From synthesis to emerging properties for energy storage in chemical bonds. R. Buonsanti 10:00 COLL 371. Synthesis, characterization and lightinduced spatial charge separation in Janus graphene oxide. A. Holm, J. Park, E.D. Goodman, J. Zhang, R. Sinclair, M. Cargnello, C.W. Frank 10:20 COLL 372. From inside out: How buried interface, defects and surface determines performance of two giant core-shell quantum dots. A. Singh, S. Majumder, N.J. Orfield, H. Htoon, J.A. Hollingsworth, K. Bustillo, J. Ciston 10:40 COLL 373. Aggregation-induced emission in lamellar solids of colloidal perovskite quantum wells. C. Shih 11:00 COLL 374. Spectroscopic evidence of conduction band fine structure in colloidal HgTe quantum dots with well-defined intraband transitions. M.H. Hudson, M. Chen, P. Guyot-Sionnest, D. Talapin 11:20 COLL 375. Blue perovskite nanocrystals for quantum dot light emitting diodes. M. Gangishetty, S. Hou, Q. Quan, D. Congreve 11:40 COLL 376. Controlled dopant migration in core/shell semiconductor nanocrystals. W. Zheng

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Understanding Nano-Bio Interactions: Implications for Bio-Imaging, Diagnosis & Treatment B. Kim, S. Wilhelm, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 377. Initial surface chemistry of nanoparticles has cascading impacts on biological systems. C.J. Murphy

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 318. Understanding surface-mediated, emergent plasmonic properties of degenerately doped Cu2-xSe semiconductor nanoparticles. X. Gan, L. Marbella, D. Kaseman, J. Millstone COLL 319. Viscosity and surface tension effects on metal sputtered onto low vapor pressure liquids. M.M. De Luna, M. Gupta COLL 320. Water interaction with NiFe-based oxide films on Pt(111)/Al2O3(0001). E. Carrasco, M.A. Niño, P. Perna, J. Camarero, D. Ecija, R. Miranda

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 9:00 COLL 378. Engineering unusual properties on the nanoscale: Smart nanomicelles for targeting tumor microenvironments. S. Nie, J. Du 9:30 Intermission. 9:40 COLL 379. Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization – the road traveled, the road ahead. S. Krishnan 10:10 COLL 380. Porphysome nanotechnology: From discovery to translation. G. Zheng 10:40 Intermission. 10:50 COLL 381. Thermally triggered nano-assassins for pancreatic cancer therapy. C. Hoskins 11:20 COLL 382. Exploring nanoparticle architecture to design small, bright upconverting nanoparticles for bioimaging. C. Siefe, R. Mehlenbacher, S. Fischer, A. Lay, J. Dionne 11:40 COLL 383. Design and surface engineering of upconversion nanoparticles for bioassays. M. Buchner, V. Muhr, S.F. Himmelstoss, L.M. Wiesholler, T. Hirsch 12:00 COLL 384. Mechanosensitive upconverting nanoparticles for visualizing mechanical forces in vivo. A. Lay, C. Siefe, S. Fischer, R. Mehlenbacher, A. Das, A. Nekimken, F. Ke, W.L. Mao, B. Pruitt, B.E. Cohen, P. Alivisatos, M. Goodman, J.A. Dionne

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Delivery & Transport Z. Gu, G. Han, J. Xie, Organizers Z. Wang, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 385. Therapeutic modification of the tumor microenvironment to overcome intratumoral transport barriers for nanomedicine. J. Panyam 9:00 COLL 386. Precision polymer architectures and molecular conjugates to enable therapeutics against undruggable targets. C. Duvall 9:30 COLL 387. Controlling in-vivo fate of liposomes using a photocleavable PEG corona. A. Kros 9:50 COLL 388. Multicompartmental nanoparticles for controlled release of combination therapies. J. Lahann 10:20 COLL 389. Engineered lipid-antibody based nanoassemblies for painting and surface modifications of red blood cells for therapy of blood borne cancers. W.J. Smith, L.G. Nilewski, N.C. Gianneschi, D. Simberg 10:50 COLL 390. Integrating synthetic protein chemistry and nanoparticles for intracellular delivery and targeted cancer therapy. M. Wang, X. Yang 11:20 COLL 391. Neutrophil-based drug delivery systems. Z. Wang 11:50 COLL 392. Tailoring renal clearance and tumor targeting of ultrasmall metal nanoparticles with particle density. S. Tang, J. Zheng, C. Peng, J. Xu, B. Du, M. Yu

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues K. Sakurai, Organizer M. A. Ilies, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 393. Delivery of chemically modified siRNAs for human therapeutics: From principles to patients. M. Manoharan 9:00 COLL 394. Attenuation of maladaptive responses in aortic adventitial fibroblasts through stimuli-triggered siRNA release from lipid-polymer nanocomplexes. M.O. Sullivan 9:30 COLL 395. DyNAvectors: Dynamic constitutional vectors for adaptive DNA delivery. M. Barboiu 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 COLL 396. Induction of potent cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity using two types of polysaccharides. S. Mochizuki, A. Moritaka, K. Sakurai 10:45 COLL 397. Lymph node targeting of potent TLR7/8 agonist via acid sensitive amphiphilic polymers with high serum stability. B. De Geest, S. Van Herck 11:15 COLL 398. Synthetic charge-invertible micelles for rapid and complete implantation of LbL drug films coated on microneedle patches for enhanced transdermal vaccination. Y. He, C. Hong, J. Li, M.T. Funkenbusch, Y. Li, D.J. Irvine, P.T. Hammond

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

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Colloid & Surface Chemistry in Industry: Applications & Career Opportunities Cosponsored by PROF H. Fairbrother, N. A. Falk, L. Tribe, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 399. R&D careers at Clorox: My experience from grad school to industrial career. N.A. Falk 8:55 COLL 400. Careers in the startup environment. B. Smith 9:15 COLL 401. Emulsions with sustainable surfactants for personal care applications. K. Whitaker, B. Beeson, B. Johnson, C.E. Mohler 9:35 COLL 402. Chemistry and industrial careers. A. Morfesis 9:55 COLL 403. Importance of surfaces and interfaces in government and industry R&D. S.R. Carlo, C.M. Soto, D.H. Mayo, B.T. Horlor, J.M. Considine, D. Allen 10:15 COLL 404. Yes, HP Inc. is also a chemical company! S. Courtenay 10:35 COLL 405. LINX: Linking industry to neutrons & X-rays. G. Smith, E. Brok, M. Schmiele, L. Arleth, K. Mortensen 10:55 COLL 406. Applications of surface chemistry in the cosmetic industry. H.S. Bui, G.S. Luengo 11:15 COLL 407. Colloid and surface science in Cabot R&D. A.T. Nikova 11:35 COLL 408. Functional polycarbonate materials: Synthesis, modification, and application. N. Park

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB

Molecular Understanding of the Structure & Reactivity of Mineral-Water Interfaces Sponsored by GEOC, Cosponsored by COLL and ENVR

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Growing with Project SEED: 50 years and 10,000+ Students Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by AGFD, AGRO, ANYL, BIOL, BMGT, CARB, CINF, COLL, ENFL, ENVR, HIST, I&EC, ORGN, PROF and SCHB

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Synthesis & Fabrication Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

MONDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces Engineering the Interface A. P. Goodwin, V. Gordon, Organizers A. L. Furst, Presiding 2:00 COLL 409. Mussel-inspired silicone oil swelling slippery surfaces with repeatable wettability recovering under extreme operating conditions. B. Jin, Q. Zhang, X. Zhan, F. Chen 2:20 COLL 410. Peptide adsorption on hydroxyapatite surfaces and implications on shape and mineralization: Impact of sequence and electrolyte pH. J. Liu, S. Hoff, C. Pramanik, T. Jamil, S. VanOosten, K. Boone, C. Tamerler, H. Heinz 2:40 COLL 411. Multifunctional macroporous biomaterial for drug delivery and efficient emulsion separations. A. Ghimire, D. Ndaya, R. Kasi, C.V. Kumar 3:00 COLL 412. Binding nanomaterials to living bacteria. H. Dong, D.A. Sarkes, J. Terrell, J.P. Jahnke, M. Hurley, D. Stratis-Cullum 3:20 COLL 413. Incorporating silica particles improves the adhesion, flexibility, and hemostatic efficacy of a polymer blend surgical sealant. J.L. Daristotle, S.T. Zaki, L. Torres Jr, L.W. Lau, A. Zografos, O.B. Ayyub, A.D. Sandler, P. Kofinas 3:40 Intermission.

4:00 COLL 414. Nanogels of zwitterionic polymer-curcumin conjugates function as a potent inhibitor of amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis and cytotoxicity. G. Zhao, X. Dong, Y. Sun 4:20 COLL 415. Three ways of fine-tuning cell adhesion to synthetic surfaces. J.B. Schlenoff, R. Surmaitis, D. Delgado, C. Arias 4:40 COLL 416. kT-scale interactions between zwitterionic coated colloids and biomaterial surfaces. M.A. Bevan 5:00 COLL 417. Protein encapsulation using cationic copolymers in the presence of zwitterionic surfactants. A. Erfani, N.H. Flyn, J.D. Ramsey, C. Aichele

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Colloidal & Interfacial Science in Separation Processes Q. Liu, S. Ponnurangam, P. Somasundaran, Organizers I. Chernyshova, Organizer, Presiding E. Roberts, Presiding 2:00 COLL 418. Removal of silica from oil-sands produced water by electrocoagulation. E. Roberts, B. FuladpanjehHojaghan, T. Shu, N. Yasri, M. Trifkovic 2:25 COLL 419. Unconventional interfacial reactivity of metal sulfides: Relation to mineral separation. H.R. Kota 2:50 COLL 420. Silica supported sterically hindered amines for CO2 capture. J. Lee, C. Yoo, C. Chen, S.E. Hayes, C. Sievers, C.W. Jones 3:15 COLL 421. Novel conducting composites for enhanced separation of salt from brackish water. S. Ponnurangam, C. Ai, V.I. Birss 3:35 COLL 422. Redox interfaces for electrochemicallymediated separations of heavy metal contaminants. X. Su, T. Hatton

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Ligand & Support Effects on Nanocatalysis H. Fan, J. He, Organizers Y. Sun, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 COLL 423. Controlling selectivity on metal nanoparticles with organic monolayers. J.W. Medlin 2:30 COLL 424. Plasmonic catalysis as a means for sustainable transformations. A.H. Moores, M. Landry, A. Gelle, C.J. Barrett 3:00 COLL 425. Synthesizing cooperative metal-support interfaces for catalysis. S. Dai 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 COLL 426. Chemical transformations in mesoporous transition metal oxides. S.L. Suib 4:15 COLL 427. Single-facet dominant anatase TiO2 (101) and (001) model catalysts to elucidate the active sites for alkanol dehydration. Y. Chen, L. Zhang, H. Wang, D. Mei, L. Kovarik, F. Gao, B. Sudduth, E. Iglesia, Y. Wang 4:45 COLL 428. Reactivity of a heterostructured plasmonic biomaterial: Gold nanoparticles on ferritin. D.R. Strongin, E.B. Cerkez, Y. Ghidey, A. Bruefach, F. Alimohammadi, A. Valentine

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nanomedicine R. Nagarajan, Organizer C. Grazon, Presiding 2:00 COLL 429. Engineering the nano-bio interface for nanomedicine applications. K. Hamad-Schifferli 2:20 COLL 430. Assessment of nanoparticles disruption to quantify drug delivery in vitro. E. Nogueira, A. Loureiro, A. Cavaco-Paulo 2:40 COLL 431. Development of target-specific 2A3 antibody-conjugated gold nanoclusters for assessment of cancer progression and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. J. Kuo, S. Tan, X. Pan, K. Chen, T. Chang, T. Kuo 3:00 COLL 432. Soysome: A new class of self-assembled colloid from soybean oil fatty acids for nanoscale drug delivery applications. M.A. Quadir, R. Chitemere, D.C. Webster 3:20 COLL 433. Structural remodeling of highdensity lipoproteins in patients with diabetes mellitus. C.L. Baveghems, S. Jayaraman, O. Gursky

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers R. Buonsanti, Presiding 2:00 COLL 440. Colloidal nanocrystals of APbX3 perovskites [A=Cs+, CH(NH2)2+, X=Cl-, Br-, I-]: Surface chemistry, selfassembly and potential applications. M. Kovalenko 2:30 COLL 441. Utility of PEGylated dithiolane ligands for controlled synthesis of water-soluble metal nanocrystals. E. Oh, K. Susumu, C. Klug, J. Delehanty, A. Huston, I. Medintz 3:00 COLL 442. Continuous flow synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles using a modular millifluidic platform. A. Vikram, V. Kumar, U. Ramesh, K. Balakrishnan, N. Oh, K. Deshpande, T. Ewers, P. Trefonas, M. Shim, P.J. Kenis 3:40 COLL 443. Synthesis of alloy nanoparticles via sputtering onto a liquid polymer. M.T. Nguyen, T. Yonezawa, L. Deng 4:00 COLL 444. Graphene inks as versatile templates for printing tiled metal oxide crystalline films. M. Liu, R. Hurt 4:20 COLL 445. Highly functionalised water-soluble fullerene derivatives: Cage size affects hierarchical selfassembled structures. I. Rasovic, K. Porfyrakis 4:40 COLL 446. Noncovalently functionalized 2D materials template solution growth of ultranarrow gold nanorods along 1-nm-wide rows of functional headgroups. A.G. Porter, T. Ouyang, T.R. Hayes, S.R. Russell, S.A. Claridge 5:00 COLL 447. Azide-alkyne click conjugation on quantum dots by selective copper coordination. V. Mann, A. Powers, D. Tilley, J. Sack, B.E. Cohen 5:20 COLL 448. New insights regarding the local atomic structure and magnetic properties in sub-10 nm iron oxide nanocrystals produced by a living growth process. S. Cooper, J.E. Hutchison

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Understanding Nano-Bio Interactions: Implications for Bio-Imaging, Diagnosis & Treatment B. Kim, S. Wilhelm, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 449. Mitigating the off-target toxicity of nanomedicines through controlled release. Y. Xia 2:30 COLL 450. Nanoparticle-based approaches to drug delivery to peripheral nerve for pain and other conditions. D.S. Kohane 3:00 Intermission. 3:10 COLL 451. Kidney-targeting peptide amphiphile micelles toward renal drug delivery. J. Wang, E. Chung 3:40 COLL 452. Multifunctional zero- and one-dimensional nanomaterials for imaging, sensing and multidrug delivery. A. Naumov, M. Hasan, E. Campbell, R. Gonzalez-Rodriguez, G. Akkaraju 4:10 Intermission. 4:20 COLL 453. Intrinsically radiolabeled nanomaterials. W. Cai 4:50 COLL 454. Enhancing nanoparticle delivery to the tumor with a targeted agent and light. M. Overchuk, K.M. Harmatys, S. Sindhwani, A.M. Syed, J. Chen, M.G. Pomper, W. Chan, G. Zheng

5:10 COLL 455. Novel catalytically active gold nanocrystals electrochemically grown in water by a continuous method. M. Merzlyakov, A. Dorfman, D.K. Pierce, D. Bryce, M. Mortenson 5:30 COLL 456. Electrochemically grown, clean surfaced gold nanocrystals exhibit a very favorable safety profile in rodents, canines, and humans. A. Dorfman, M. Hotchkin, M. Merzliakov, G. Frick, M. Mortenson

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Imaging & Targeting Z. Gu, Z. Wang, J. Xie, Organizers G. Han, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 457. SERS nanoparticles in medicine: New opportunities for spectroscopic cancer detection and imageguided surgery. S. Nie, L.A. Lane, R. Xue 2:30 COLL 458. Optically activated nanomedicines. T. Hasan 3:00 COLL 459. Patient-tailored immunotherapies enabled by multimodal ImmunoPET-Raman imaging. R. Bardhan, Y. Ou, A. Mahadevan-Jansen, T.E. Peterson, M. Nickels, H.C. Manning 3:20 COLL 460. Biomedical applications of porphyrinphospholipid liposomes. J.F. Lovell 3:50 COLL 461. Molecular afterglow imaging of semiconducting polymer nanoparticles. K. Pu 4:20 COLL 462. Ultrasound-triggered micro-to-nano conversion: Extending porphyrin-bubble theranostic potential beyond the vasculature. C. Pellow, D. Goertz, G. Zheng 4:40 COLL 463. Remotely targeted and triggered nanomedicine. D.S. Kohane 5:10 COLL 464. From molecules to mammals: Inventing luminescent nanoparticles for biology. G. Han 5:40 COLL 465. Design and preparation of near infrared absorbing BODIPY nanoparticles: Applications in photodynamic therapy. L. Huang

SECTION H

3:00 COLL 475. Nanotechnology innovations and career opportunities at Savannah River National Laboratory. S. Hunyadi Murph 3:20 COLL 476. Wettability modification to enhance productivity in natural gas wells. J.R. Baran 3:40 COLL 477. How to train students to be independent scientists at Colgate. L. Pan 4:00 COLL 478. Research career at an army laboratory: Colloid and surface science research to support soldier performance optimization. R. Nagarajan 4:20 COLL 479. Development and integration of dropletbased microfluidic technologies into industrial research. C. Nelson, N. Loufakis, K. Whitaker, D. Miller, A. Schmitt, A. Grzesiak, C.E. Mohler 4:40 Panel Discussion.

Ion Transport at the Nanoscale: Research & Capabilities at the DOE’s Nano Centers Sponsored by PRES, Cosponsored by ANYL, COLL, COMSCI, ENFL, ENVR, GEOC and SCHB

Molecular Understanding of the Structure & Reactivity of Mineral-Water Interfaces Sponsored by GEOC, Cosponsored by COLL and ENVR

Nanotechnology & Single Cell Analysis in Biology & Medicine: Next Frontier Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL, COLL, MPPG and PHYS

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Undergraduate Research Posters Colloid & Surface Chemistry Sponsored by CHED, Cosponsored by COLL and SOCED

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Theory, Simulation & Mechanism Study Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

MONDAY EVENING

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues

SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Exhibit Hall B2/C

M. A. Ilies, K. Sakurai, Organizers M. Chorny, Presiding 2:00 COLL 466. Drug delivery for ovarian cancer: The role of surface chemistry and administration route for targeting therapeutics with layer-by-layer nanoparticles. S. Correa, N. Boehnke, A. Barberio, M.A. Quadir, E.C. Dreaden, P.T. Hammond 2:30 COLL 467. Biologically inspired design consideration for polymeric anticancer nanomedicine. S. Aryal, T. Nguyen, A. Pitchaimani, R. Marasni 3:00 COLL 468. Mutual prodrugs for treating aggressive neuroblastoma with biodegradable nanocarriers. I.S. Alferiev, D. Guerrero, F. Nguyen, P. Guan, V. Kolla, I. Fishbein, G.M. Brodeur, M. Chorny 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 COLL 469. Gd-DTPA-dialkylamine with o-NO2benzylalcohol group: Synthesis and self-assembled behaviors for T1-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and lightcontrolled drug carriers. C. Liu, K. Ewert, Y. Li, C.R. Safinya, W. Qiao 4:15 COLL 470. Multiple stimuli-responsive fluorescent micelles based on the self-assembly hyperbranched polymer for drug delivery and release. M. Xu, H. Hailong 4:45 COLL 471. Remotely controlled assembly and biocatalytic release of cargo molecules. S. Minko, A. Zakharchenko, E. Katz

R. Nagarajan, Organizer 8:00 – 10:00 35, 62, 82, 120, 122, 130, 166, 177, 180, 182-183, 185-186, 188-189, 193-194, 197-199, 209-210, 213, 215-216, 220, 222, 225, 231-234, 237-238, 240, 242, 244, 250, 254-255, 258, 260, 272, 278, 280, 282, 291-292, 297-299, 302, 305, 312-313, 317-318, 326, 334, 336, 338, 384, 444-445, 454, 462. See previous listings. 523, 542, 600, 602, 604, 611, 614, 631, 681-682, 704, 715, 758, 775. See subsequent listings.

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Colloid & Surface Chemistry in Industry: Applications & Career Opportunities Cosponsored by PROF H. Fairbrother, N. A. Falk, L. Tribe, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 472. Mixing up better products in microgravity. M. Lynch 2:20 COLL 473. Research experiences at E Ink Corporation. J. Anseth 2:40 COLL 474. Working for a rapidly growing small company. R.I. Maccuspie

Sci-Mix

TUESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces V. Gordon, Organizer A. P. Goodwin, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 480. Comprehensive screening of neuronal behavior on gradient micro-alignment topographies. R. McNaughton, Y. Huo, G. Li, H. Man, X. Zhang 8:50 COLL 481. Dampening immune responses with polyphenol multilayer coatings for islet transplantation. V.A. Kozlovskaya, J.M. Barra, H. Tse, E.P. Kharlampieva 9:10 COLL 482. Synthesis and design of a biomimetic conductive nanocomposite for responsive wound management technology. H.R. Lange, C.X. Loza, L.K. Werth, W.E. Chura, J.J. Keleher 9:30 COLL 483. Adaptation of charge and hydrophilicity of native protein on surfaces employing thermal treatment in fluorous media. S. Gopalakrishnan, L. Wang, Y. Lee, J. Zhu, S. Nonnenmann, V.M. Rotello 9:50 COLL 484. Investigating the morphological and mechanical properties of amyloid fibril formation using atomic force microscopy (AFM) for biomaterial applications. S. Gokalp, M.C. Foster 10:10 COLL 485. Therapeutic luminal coating of the intestine. Y. Lee 10:30 Intermission.

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TECHNICAL PROGRAM

3:40 COLL 434. Silicon nanostructures for high-throughput intracellular gene delivery. C. Zhao, Q. Yang, S. Hou, X. Xu, N. Wattanatorn, W. Liu, H. Tseng, S.J. Jonas, P.S. Weiss 4:00 COLL 435. Coacervation-based model systems for intracellular compartmentalization. A. Marianelli, B. Miller, M. Sherman, C.D. Keating 4:20 COLL 436. Gold nanoparticles as radiosensitizers demonstrated in a chick chorioallantonic membrane model. C.S. Filgueira, F. Ferraro, V. Vighetto, N. DiMarzio, R. Pathak, H. Liu, A. Pandey, M. Villanueva, C. Chua, S. Mitra, A. Sikora, N.J. Halas, A. Grattoni 4:40 COLL 437. Non-cationic RNA-polymer complexes for RNA interference. Z. Jiang, W. Cui, J. Mager, S. Thayumanavan 5:00 COLL 438. Scalable fabrication of one- and twodimensional gold nanostructures for plasmonic biosensing applications. C. Zhao, X. Xu, A.R. Ferhan, N. Chiang, J.A. Jackman, Q. Yang, W. Liu, A.M. Andrews, N. Cho, P.S. Weiss 5:20 COLL 439. Nano-scale interfacial reversible protein folding of amyloidogenic peptides. K. Yokoyama

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 10:50 COLL 486. Hyaluronan density influences adhesion, morphology and migration of cancer cells. A.M. Carvalho, D. Soares da Costa, R. Reis, I. Pashkuleva 11:10 COLL 487. Photodegradable polyacrylamide gels for dynamic modulus control of cell culture platforms. S.C. Norris, J. Soto, S. Li, A.M. Kasko 11:30 COLL 488. Elastomeric particles for cell and biomarker isolation in acoustofluidic devices. W. Shields, K.A. Ohiri, L.M. Johnson, A.L. Li, G.P. Lopez 11:50 COLL 489. Discoid silica nanoparticles for stem cells tracking by ultrasound imaging. F. Chen, M. Ma, J. Wang, S. Chen, E. Zhao, A. Jhunjhunwala, S. Darmadi, H. Chen, J.V. Jokerst 12:10 COLL 490. Phage colloids: Bacteriophages link enzymes to magnetic colloids for catalysis and micropumps. M. Alarcón-Correa, J. Günther, S. Knoppe, J. Troll, V.M. Kadiri, D. Rothenstein, J. Bill, P. Fischer

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Toward Atomic Precision in Controlling the Low Dimensional Materials G. Chen, R. Jin, G. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 491. Single-atom tailoring of metal nanoparticles. R. Jin 9:15 COLL 492. Organic reaction catalysed by atomically precise metal nanoclusters. M. Zhu 9:55 Intermission. 10:25 COLL 493. Tailoring the structure of 58-electron gold nanoclusters: Au103S2(SNap)41 and its implications. T. Higaki, R. Jin 10:45 COLL 494. Molecular “surgery” and beyond: Understanding heterometal doping in atomically precise nanoclusters. M.G. Taylor, Q. Li, R. Jin, G. Mpourmpakis 11:05 COLL 495. Structural and electronic characterization of CoO nanoislands on Au(111) using LT-STM. A. SanchezGrande, J. Rodriguez-Fernandez, E. Carrasco, K. Lauwaet, J. Fester, R. Miranda, J. Lauritsen, D. Ecija

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Ligand & Support Effects on Nanocatalysis H. Fan, J. He, Organizers Y. Sun, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 496. Enhancing nanoparticle catalysis for chemical transformations. S. Sun 9:00 COLL 497. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated inside of zeolite crystals as highly efficient heterogeneous catalysts for chemical transformation. F. Xiao 9:30 COLL 498. Controlled encapsulation of nanoparticle catalysts into nanoporous materials. C. Tsung 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 COLL 499. Layer-by-layer assembly of colloidal nanosheets with individually differing properties to generate improved water oxidation catalysts. M. Zdilla, R. Ding, I. McKendry, R. Remsing, H. Peng, J.P. Perdew, D.R. Strongin, Q. Kang, A. Thenuwara, E. Borguet, Y. Aulin 10:45 COLL 500. Transformation pathways of bimetallic nanoparticles at atomic scale. Y. Wang 11:15 COLL 501. Multimetallic nanocrystals and their surface and interface electrocatalysis. S. Guo 11:45 COLL 502. Fabrication and application of inorganic nanoparticle superstructures. Z. Tang

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nanomaterials-Synthesis, Growth & Assembly R. Nagarajan, Organizer J. Reiner, Presiding 8:30 COLL 503. Solutions for catalysis: A surfactantfree synthesis of precious metal nanoparticle colloids in mono-alcohols for catalysts with enhanced performances. J. Quinson, S. Neumann, J. Bucher, M. Inaba, S. Simonsen, L. Theil Kuhn, M. Oezaslan, S. Kunz, M. Arenz 8:50 COLL 504. Cation exchange as a route to quantum dot synthesis: Are the daughter quantum dots inherently defective? C. Lin, S.E. Benjamin, H.D. Hall, M.L. Ary, X.A. Aguilar, J.W. Campbell, P.G. Van Patten

138

9:10 COLL 505. Photoinitiated growth of silver nanoparticles in solutions of organic acids. D.P. Pullman, N. Yamamoto, R. Leslie, M. Keogh 9:30 COLL 506. Controlled packing and phase transitions via templated evaporative colloidal assembly. C. Shillingford, V. Grebe, A. McMullen, M. Weck 9:50 COLL 507. Nanopore observations of pH dependent fluctuations in mercaptobenzoic-capped gold nanoclusters. B. Cox, P. Woodworth, M. Bertino, J. Reiner 10:10 COLL 508. Crystal face identification by Raman spectroscopy and application to the epitaxial growth of acetaminophen. T.K. Wijethunga, J. Stojaković, M. Bellucci, X. Chen, A.S. Myerson, B. Trout 10:30 COLL 509. Kinetics of self-assembly: Experimental probes of noble metal nanoparticle formation. M. Watzky, H. Sandoe, A. Ethridge 10:50 COLL 510. Engineering the assembly of semiconducting two-dimensional materials prepared by molecular tweezer chemical exfoliation technique. M.A. Mahmoud, M. Abdul-moqueet 11:10 COLL 511. Mechanically robust thin films coatings from functionalized silica nanoparticles. M. Barak, F.C. Cebeci, E.B. Sevinis Ozbulut 11:30 COLL 512. Multi-pronged biomimetic approach to create optically tunable nanoparticles. K.M. Harmatys, J. Chen, D.M. Charron, C.M. MacLaughlin, G. Zheng 11:50 COLL 513. InP-based alloy quantum dots and their compositional effects on thermal/chemical stability. R.P. Brown, Z. Rosenzweig

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers A. Joshi, Presiding 8:30 COLL 514. Colloidal nanoparticles directly observed by multi-dimensional liquid phase TEM. B. Kim, J. Heo, S. Kim, J. Kim, D. Lee, J. Park 9:00 COLL 515. High-resolution single molecule force spectroscopy using carbon nanotubes in an optical tweezer. D.J. Jackson, M. Kamenetska 9:30 COLL 516. Architecting corrosion-resistant alloys through nanoscale morphology. A. Smith, Y. Balogun, X. Ye 9:50 COLL 517. Informing nanocrystal synthesis via correlated atomic structure and single nanocrystal photophysics. J.R. McBride, K. Reid, S.J. Rosenthal 10:10 COLL 518. Single-crystal electrochemistry reveals why nanowires grow. B.J. Wiley 10:30 COLL 519. In-situ measuring the electronic structure of nanocrystal thin films using energy-resolved electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. S. Volk, N. Yazdani, O. Yarema, M. Yarema, V. Wood 10:50 COLL 520. Submolecular resolution spectroscopic imaging for photoactive molecules and assemblies. S. Wang, N. Chiang, N. Wattanatorn, P.S. Weiss 11:10 COLL 521. Field effect transparency of 2D materials: A multiscale analysis. T. Tian, P. Rice, E.J. Santos, C. Shih 11:30 COLL 522. Contact resistance of carbon nanotubes in vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest. M. Li, N. Yang, V. Wood, H. Park

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nano-Bio Interactions R. Nagarajan, Organizer K. Hamad-Schifferli, Presiding 8:30 COLL 523. Semiconductor nanoplatelets: A new class of ultrabright and biocompatible probes for biological applications. D. Kechkeche 8:50 COLL 524. Fluorescent nanoparticle sensor for hormones based on a native microbial transcription factor. C. Grazon, T. Nguyen, R.C. Baer, U. Kuzmanovic, M. Chern, M. Chen, M. Zamani, A. Fan, X. Zhang, S. Lecommandoux, C. Klapperich, A.M. Dennis, M.W. Grinstaff, J. Galagan 9:10 COLL 525. Integrated multifunctional nanoplatform based on superparamagnetism and near-infrared to near-infrared photoluminescence for deep-tissue dual-mode imaging. F. Yang, A. Skripka, A. Benayas, X. Dong, S. Hong, F. Ren, J. Oh, X. Liu, F. Vetrone, D. Ma 9:30 COLL 526. Antifouling zwitterionic quantum dot surface chemistry: Impact on intracellular diffusion. N. Lequeux, T. Pons, M. Dahan, E. Balloul, M. Debayle

9:50 COLL 527. Probing bio-nano interactions with colloidal poly(ethylene glycol) particles. J. Cui 10:10 COLL 528. Life and death in a bacterial biofilm under antibiotic attack characterized by fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. C.B. Volle, H. Greer, K. Overton, M. Nunez, M.A. Ferguson, E.M. Spain 10:30 COLL 529. Developing gold nanoparticles for inhibiting cancer metastasis. Y. Wu, M.R. Ali, M.A. El-Sayed 10:50 COLL 530. Biofragment responsive diffraction grid sensor: Using specific binding molecule conjugated hydrogel. W.S. Jinn, B. Kang, M. Shin, S. Oh, B. Mun, S. Haam 11:10 COLL 531. Investigation of nanoscale interfacial interaction of amyloid beta peptide. K. Yokoyama 11:30 COLL 532. Temperature-controlled adhesion of bacteria and lectins to carbohydrate presenting microgel films. T.J. Paul, C. Spormann, P. Watermann, S. Rübel, T.K. Lindhorst, S. Schmidt 11:50 COLL 533. Ethylenediamine-based betaine structure switches the neutral net charge of polyzwitterion into cationic at tumorous pH toward effective tumor accumulation of the coated nanomaterials. H. Takemoto, A. Ranneh, T. Nomoto, M. Matsui, K. Tomoda, N. Nishiyama

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Immunotherapy & Transport Z. Gu, G. Han, Z. Wang, Organizers J. Xie, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 534. Peptide nucleic acid-lipid nanodiscs for delivery of STING agonists in the tumor microenvironment. D.J. Irvine 9:00 COLL 535. Nanomedicine approaches to improve cancer immunotherapy. A.Z. Wang 9:30 COLL 536. Immunomodulation in vivo through direct cytosolic delivery of siRNA to macrophages. J. Hardie, Y. Jiang, Y. Liu, M. Ray, X. Luo, R. Das, R. Landis, M.E. Farkas, V.M. Rotello 9:50 COLL 537. Immunostimulatory dual-functional nanocarriers that improve cancer immunochemotherapy. S. Li 10:20 COLL 538. Polymers and polymer assemblies with inherent pharmacologic activity to target chemokine networks in the treatment of metastatic cancer. D. Oupicky 10:50 COLL 539. Protein engineering to modulate the immunostasis mediated by the PD-1 immune checkpoint. M. Chen, P. Zhao, S. Dong, P. Wang 11:10 COLL 540. Bio-responsive materials for improving iron chelation therapy. M. Xiong 11:40 COLL 541. Surface modified nanoparticles for photoimmunotherapy and X-ray induced photodynamic therapy. J. Xie, Z. Zhen, S. Zhou, H. Chen, W. Zhang 12:10 COLL 542. Dose dependencies and biocompatibility of renal clearable gold nanoparticles: From mice to nonhuman primates. J. Xu, M. Yu, C. Peng, J. Zheng

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues K. Sakurai, Organizer M. A. Ilies, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 543. Design of lipid-protein conjugate with a self-assembling ability on a cell membrane by using microbial transglutaminase reaction. M. Takahara, R. Wakabayashi, K. Minamihata, M. Goto, N. Kamiya 9:00 COLL 544. Synthetic phospholipids: A versatile molecular platform to design cationic amphiphiles used for nucleic acid delivery. P. Jaffres, M. Berchel, A. Bouraoui, O. Lozach, T.L. Gall, T. Montier 9:30 COLL 545. Chain length and headgroup dependence of phase separation in mixed vesicles of DiA and phosphatidyl choline. S. Bandegi, M.A. Ilies, S.L. Wunder 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 COLL 546. Advances in peptide delivery: Hydrophobic ion pairing in SEDDS for solubilization, protection, and enhanced delivery of oral peptides. V. Jannin, A. Bernkop-Schnürch 10:45 COLL 547. Highly stable, ultrasmall liposomes with stimuli-responsive drug-release capability for cancer therapy. B. Hong, A. Iscen, G.C. Schatz, S.T. Nguyen 11:15 COLL 548. Use of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations for in silico self-assembly of nanoparticles: Opportunities and limitations. B.I. Iorga, E. Selwa

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Surfaces & Interfaces R. Nagarajan, Organizer J. Frechette, Presiding 8:30 COLL 549. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrophobins near gas, oil and water interfaces. A. Vodopivec, Y. Chen, P.S. Russo, F.R. Hung 8:50 COLL 550. High-throughput wettability screening of formulations and surfaces. T. Kuo, A.A. Lucio, H. Wiles, B. Orvosh, D. Hayes 9:10 COLL 551. Competitive adsorption between nanoparticles and surfactants at the oil-water interface. J. Frechette 9:30 COLL 552. Elasticity and failure of liquid marbles: Influence of particle coating and marble volume. A. Rendos, N. Alsharif, B.L. Kim, K. Brown 9:50 COLL 553. Isobaric vapor–liquid phase diagrams of multicomponent systems with nanoscale interfacial curvature. N. Shardt, J.A. Elliott 10:10 COLL 554. Photoresponsive systems based on molecular motors. J. Cheng, B. Feringa 10:30 COLL 555. Spirals from drops. S. McBride, R. Skye, S. Khan, S. Dash, K. Varanasi 10:50 COLL 556. Molecular dynamic simulation of molecules diffusion on tracks and nanoparticles. Y. Han, P. Kral 11:10 COLL 557. Surface tension measurements of model and nascent sea spray aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy. H. Lee, K.K. Ray, V.H. Grassian, A.V. Tivanski 11:30 COLL 558. Experimental framework for understanding intermolecular interactions in carbon dioxidewater mixtures for EOR and storage. R. Sharma, Q.K. Elias, T.S. Ramakrishnan 11:50 COLL 559. Exploring new avenues of particle charging in apolar media. B. Ponto, J.C. Berg

Technical Developments & Applications of Optical Chemical Imaging Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by BIOL‡, COLL and PHYS‡

Structure & Function of 2D Materials Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Emerging Surface & Coating Materials Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

TUESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Langmuir Lectures, NanoLetters Award Lecture, ACS Materials & Interfaces Award Lecture Cosponsored by PROF R. Nagarajan, Organizer E. Borguet, Presiding 2:00 Introduction of Langmuir Lecturer. 2:05 COLL 560. Directing colloid motion in nematic liquid crystals near wavy boundaries. K.J. Stebe 2:50 Introduction of Langmuir Lecturer. 2:55 COLL 561. Field-driven assembly, manipulation, and propulsion of dynamic structures made of particles. O.D. Velev 3:40 Introduction of NanoLetters Lecturer. 3:45 COLL 562. Nanostructured functional hydrogels as an emerging platform for renewable energy and environmental technologies. G. Yu 4:30 Introduction of AMI Lecturer. 4:35 COLL 563. Probing and understanding interfaces and interphases in electrochemical energy storage systems. S. Meng

Structure & Function of 2D Materials Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Smart & Responsive Coatings Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

WEDNESDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces V. Gordon, Organizer A. P. Goodwin, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 564. On demand release of bacteria from microwell arrays. A. van der Vlies, N. Barua, P. Guzman, T.G. Platt, R.R. HAnsen 8:50 COLL 565. Degradation of protein coronas when exposed to the proteolytic environment of the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line PANC1. C. RodriguezQuijada, H. de Puig, M. Sánchez-Purrà, C. Yelleswarapu, J. Celli, K. Hamad-Schifferli 9:10 COLL 566. Biological identity and receptors recognition of graphene nanoflakes dispersions. V. Castagnola, L. Boselli, M. Lo Giudice, F. Alnasser, K. Dawson 9:30 COLL 567. Supported lipid bilayer microfluidics for gene delivery. J.N. Belling, J.A. Jackman, L.K. Heidenreich, L.M. Kawakami, T.D. Young, L. Scarabelli, C. Zhao, N. Cho, S.J. Jonas, P.S. Weiss 9:50 COLL 568. Layer-by-layer nanoparticles for cytokine delivery against cancer. A. Barberio, S. Correa, E.C. Dreaden, T. Tokatlian, M. Melo, D.J. Irvine, P.T. Hammond 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 COLL 569. Tuning non-covalent interactions for multiple cargo encapsulation inside P22 VLPs. H. Waghwani, C. Fu, J. Johnson, T. Douglas, M. Uchida 10:50 COLL 570. OBP fused with cell-penetrating and anchor peptides promotes liposomal transduction of 1-aminoanthracene. F. Gonçalves, T.G. Castro, E. Nogueira, R. Pires, R. Reis, C. Silva, A. Ribeiro, A. Cavaco-Paulo 11:10 COLL 571. Enhancement of Cas9 RNP delivery using a small molecule caged surfactant. J. Roeise, J. Li, A. Taing, L. Chan, K. Thakker, N. Murthy 11:30 COLL 572. Sugar-grafted cyclodextrin as drug carrier for intravesical therapy for bladder cancer. M. Li, E. Kang, E. Chiong, K. Neoh

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Toward Atomic Precision in Controlling the Low Dimensional Materials G. Chen, R. Jin, G. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 573. Photochemical synthesis and photocatalysis with atomically precise metal clusters. K. Stamplecoskie 9:15 COLL 574. Catalytic hydrogenation of nitriles over atomically precise nickel clusters with a double-crown anatomy. Y. Zhu 9:55 COLL 575. Defect-associated adsorption of monoethanolamine on TiO2(110) surface: From single molecules to a monolayer. S. Sohn, S. Kim, S. Kwak, H. Shin 10:15 Intermission. 10:45 COLL 576. Aggregation/self-assembled approach for efficient AuAg bimetallic nanocluster-based photosensitizers. H. Kawasaki, D. Hikosou, S. Saita 11:25 COLL 577. Addressing the isomer cataloging problem for nanopores in two-dimensional lattices. A. Govind Rajan, K. Silmore, J. Swett, D. Blankschtein, M. Strano 11:45 COLL 578. Towards the understanding and engineering of the asymmetric electric field screening in van der Waals heterostructures. L. Li, T. Tian, Q. Cai, C. Shih, E.J. Santos

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Photo- & Electro-Nanocatalysis H. Fan, J. He, Y. Sun, Organizers J. Zhao, Presiding 8:30 COLL 579. Self-assembly of anisotropic nanocrystals and their transformations under high pressure. O. Chen 9:00 COLL 580. Silicon nanowries as an effective photoelectrode for solar-driven CO2 reduction applications. D. Wang, W. Li, D. He, G. Li 9:30 COLL 581. Promoting effect of Ni(OH)2 on Pt/Pd for electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation reaction. Y. Li 10:00 Intermission.

10:15 COLL 582. Synthesis of hollow multimetallic nanoparticles as photo and electrochemical catalysts. J. Zhao, S. Chen, S. Thota, Y. Wang 10:45 COLL 583. Increasing the productivity of electrosynthesis with flow-through nanowire electrodes. B.J. Wiley 11:15 COLL 584. Multi-shelled metal oxides hollow materials: Synthetic chemistry and applications. D. Wang 11:45 COLL 585. Cu-based hybrid nanocrystals for electrochemical CO2 conversion. R. Buonsanti

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Surfactant Systems R. Nagarajan, Organizer Z. Niroobakhsh, Presiding 8:30 COLL 586. Spherical micelle transition behaviors at different composition of calix[4]arene by the electrostatic interaction. J. Lee, S. Fujii, R. Takahashi, K. Sakurai 8:50 COLL 587. Effect of tail terminal trimethyl silyl groups on interfacial properties and aggregation behavior of surfactants. M. Sagisaka, K. Fujita, T. Endo, T. Narumi, A. Yoshizawa, A. Czajka, J. Eastoe 9:10 COLL 588. Phase behavior of a stabilized surfactant/ fatty acid self-assembly material. Z. Niroobakhsh, R. Hickey, A. Belmonte 9:30 COLL 589. Switchable photoacoustic effect due to micellization of sodium dodecyl sulfate with methylene blue. J. Wang, C. Lin, J.V. Jokerst 9:50 COLL 590. Magnetic surfactants as a versatile tool for functional materials design. A. Pasc 10:10 COLL 591. Monodispersity of the micelles composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-attached surfactants: Platonic micelles in conventional micelle system. H. Matsumoto, S. Fujii, R. Takahashi, K. Sakurai 10:30 COLL 592. Structural and rheological properties of micelles in a shear flow. B. O Conchuir, R.L. Anderson, M.A. Johnston 10:50 COLL 593. Formation of ultra-uniform micelles via morphological evolution during a chemical reaction. W.R. Lindemann, J. Tian, J. Ortony 11:10 COLL 594. Branched pseudo-oligomeric cationic surfactant in organic media. M.A. Walters, B. Jin, L. VogtMaranto, A. Velasquez 11:30 COLL 595. Platonic micelles part 1: Monodisperse micelles in the system of reverse micelles. S. Fujii, R. Miyake, J. Lee, R. Takahashi, K. Sakurai 11:50 COLL 596. Platonic micelles part 2: Kinetic consideration of the micelles with the discrete aggregation numbers and mono-dispersity. K. Sakurai, R. Takahashi, J. Lee, S. Fujii

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers A. Singh, Presiding 8:30 COLL 597. Protein-like polymers as peptide, small molecule and protein delivery agents to cells and tissues. N.C. Gianneschi 9:00 COLL 598. Bioelectronics communication: Encoding regulatory responses using nanostructured semiconductor thin films. A. Ivanisevic 9:30 COLL 599. Interfacial chemistry of biomimetic asymmetric nanochannels. L. Wen 10:10 COLL 600. Concentric Nd(III)-sensitized core-shell upconversion nanoparticles for excitation with a biobenign wavelength. C. Arboleda, S. He, A. Stubelius, N. Johnson, A. Almutairi 10:30 COLL 601. Target-specific glucose-conjugated gold nanoclusters as fluorescent probes for quantitative analysis of glucose metabolic cleavage in glucose transporters overexpressed cancer cells. T. Kuo, X. Pan, T. Chang, K. Chen, J. Kuo, S. Tan 10:50 COLL 602. Eradication of multidrug-resistant bacteria by DNA-encapsulated two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides. A. Debnath, S. Saha, A. Yousaf, A. Green 11:10 COLL 603. Excellent activity of biocompatible transition metal dichalcogenide nanosheets for scavenging reactive oxygen species. D. Yim, J. Kim, H. Kim, J. Yang, T. Kang, S. Yoo, J. Kim

139

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

SECTION I

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL 11:30 COLL 604. Identification of dynamic domains for ligand on monolayer-grafted nanoparticles and their implications for bio-interactions. D. Hristov, H. Lopez, Y. Ortin, K. O’Sullivan, K. Hamad-Schifferli, K.A. Dawson, D. Brougham 11:50 COLL 605. Targeting bacteria with nanoantibiotics. M. Yan

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nano-Bio Interactions R. Nagarajan, Organizer K. Burns, K. Hamad-Schifferli, Presiding 8:30 COLL 606. Atomistic modeling of nanoparticles nanomedicines: From protein corona to bio-activity. P. Kral 9:00 COLL 607. Biocompatible nanoprobes based on functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for the targeted imaging of prostate cancer cells. F. CortezonTamarit, V. Mirabello, H. Ge, S. Pascu 9:20 COLL 608. Polymer corona phase on single walled carbon nanotubes as an artificial molecular recognition site for real-time small therapeutic detection. J. Dong, M. Strano 9:40 COLL 609. Effects of surface atom coordination on protein-nanoparticle interactions. Z. Xia, E. Villarreal, H. Wang, B. Lau 10:00 COLL 610. Polymeric surface chemistry for quantum dot-based pH imaging. M. Debayle, N. Lequeux, T. Pons 10:20 COLL 611. Cellular delivery of doxorubicin mediated by disulfide reduction of a peptide-dendrimer bioconjugate. K. Burns, J. Delehanty 10:40 COLL 612. Flexible ultrathin graphene microstructures for 3D biosensing. W. Xu, J. Pagaduan, Q. Huang, D.H. Gracias 11:00 COLL 613. Ligand mediated exchange of oxidation state dependent ROS scavenging activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles. V. Patel, A. Karakoti 11:20 COLL 614. New method for quantifying low-energy electron emission from clinically relevant nanoparticles. L. Cramer, B.P. Coughlin, S. Kunjachan, O. Tillement, R. Berbeco, E.H. Sykes 11:40 COLL 615. Targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for disclosing critical information of lung cancer. L. Wu, X. Xu, J. Ping, Y. Li, K. Wang, B. Shen

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications New Formulations Z. Gu, Z. Wang, J. Xie, Organizers G. Han, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COLL 616. Development of a dexamethasone prodrug (ZSJ-0228) micelle formulation for effective and safe treatment of lupus nephritis. Z. Jia, X. Wang, X. Wei, G. Zhao, K.W. Foster, F. Qiu, Y. Gao, F. Yuan, F. Yu, G.M. Thiele, T.K. Bronich, J.R. O’Dell, D. Wang 9:00 COLL 617. Polymeric nanomedicine: Nanoproperty synchronization. Y. Shen, Z. Zhou 9:30 COLL 618. Biomimetic polymer-based self-assembled nanomedicine. S. Lecommandoux 9:50 COLL 619. Elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide in mesenchymal-like cancer cells can selectively trigger the dissolution of silver nanoparticles. R. Singh 10:20 COLL 620. Bio-inspired nanoparticle-based transcription factor to control stem cell fate and function. K. Lee 10:50 COLL 621. Formulation of dual component solid drug nanoparticles for improved oral bioavailability of Darunavir and Ritonavir. A.C. Savage, S.J. Ashcroft, H. Box, J. Sharp, M. Neary, A. Owen, S. Rannard 11:10 COLL 622. Structural DNA nanotechnology: Complex self-assembly and biomedical applications. Y. Ke 11:40 COLL 623. Dynamic topographical structure: A new parameter for designing nanomedicine. H. Cheng, H. Zhou, Z. Fan, P.Y. Li 12:10 COLL 624. Structurally modulated codelivery of siRNA and Argonaute 2 for enhanced RNA interference. J. Li, C. Wu, W. Wang, Y. He, P.T. Hammond

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

140

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues M. A. Ilies, Organizer K. Sakurai, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 625. Physicochemical properties of selfassembled cyclodextrin nanoparticles and their application in drug delivery. T. Loftsson 9:00 COLL 626. Combination loading of doxorubicin and resveratrol in polycaprolactone polymeric micelles. M.C. Stefan, K. Washington, R. Kularatne, P. Soltantabar, E.J. Calubaquib, M.C. Biewer 9:30 COLL 627. Self-assembled block copolymer micelles with tuned hydrolytic stability as efficient docetaxel delivery systems for breast cancer therapy. U. Satyal, V.D. Sharma, H. Hensley, M.A. Ilies 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 COLL 628. How to increase micelle loading by manipulating the preparation approach for frozen block copolymer micelles? A theoretical view. R. Nagarajan 10:45 COLL 629. Stabilizing colloidal drug aggregates for drug-rich nanoparticle formulations. A. Ganesh, J. Logie, C. McLaughlin, B. Shoichet, M.S. Shoichet 11:15 COLL 630. Rapid recovery of clofazimine nanoparticles with long-term storage stability as anticryptosporidium therapy. J. Feng, Y. Zhang, S. McManus, K. Ristroph, H. Lu, K. Gong, C. White, R.K. Prudhomme

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Surface Chemistry Nanoparticle Surfaces & Atomic Layer Deposition S. L. Tait, Organizer Y. Chen, Presiding 8:30 COLL 631. NMR analysis of ligand environments on gold nanoparticles: The effect of surface curvature and ligand binding modes. M. Wu, C.J. Murphy 8:50 COLL 632. Dynamics and morphology of polymermodified nanoparticle elucidated by NMR spectroscopy. Y. Zhang, C.G. Fry, J.A. Pedersen, R.J. Hamers 9:10 COLL 633. Optical evaluation of gold nanostars on polymer mats for uranyl detection. H.T. Phan, A.J. Haes 9:30 COLL 634. Light-enabled reversible self-assembly and tunable optical properties of stable hairy nanoparticles. Y. Chen, Z. Lin 9:50 COLL 635. Synthesis of bifunctional NHC-CO2 adducts for SERS-based sensing on gold. J.F. DeJesus, M.J. Trujillo, J.P. Camden, D.M. Jenkins 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 COLL 636. Epitaxial, ultra-thin Au coating as a barrier for oxidation damages for silver nanowires. Y. Zhu 10:50 COLL 637. Colloidal particle assisted fabrication of self-cleaning ordered ZnO nanostructures for enhanced room temperature gas sensing by light trapping mechanism. P. Chakrabarty, M. Banik, S. Santra, N. Gogurla, S. Ray, R. Mukherjee 11:10 COLL 638. Small size Si precursor inhibitors for area-selective atomic layer deposition. B. Ko, M. Khan, J. Lee, B. Shong, W. Kim, H. Lee 11:30 COLL 639. Nanoscale structuring of surfaces by using atomic layer deposition: Controlled synthesis of nanocavities. C. Hess, P. Ruff 11:50 COLL 640. TiN etching in the semiconductor industry: Effects of material deposition and etch compositions. J. Hoogboom, A. Klipp, L. Amundson

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Functional Surface & Coatings Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 152

Biomaterials & Biointerfaces V. Gordon, Organizer A. P. Goodwin, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 COLL 641. Probing antimicrobial peptide/lipid A membrane interactions using single-molecule dynamics. N. Nelson, D.K. Schwartz 2:20 COLL 642. Analysis of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching for freestanding lipid membrane over SiO2 microwells. A. Oshima, H. Nakashima, K. Sumitomo 2:40 COLL 643. Towards realistic large area cell membrane mimics: Excluding oil, controlling composition and including ion channels. P.J. Beltramo, L. Scheidegger, J. Vermant 3:00 COLL 644. Investigating the interactions of menaquinones with common phospholipids using Langmuir monolayers. B.J. Peters, C. Van Cleave, A. Haase, J.T. Koehn, K. Werst, D. Crick, D.C. Crans 3:20 COLL 645. Controlling receptor recycling using engineered ligands. A. Trementozzi, A.C. DeGroot, C. Zhao, J. Stachowiak 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 COLL 646. Neutron reflectometry reveals structural aspects of blood protein and antibody adsorption to polymer brushes. V.M. Latza, I. Rodriguez Loureiro, I. Kiesel, A. Halperin, G. Fragneto, E. Schneck 4:20 COLL 647. Label-free direct visualization of multivalent binding of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and bone morphogenetic protein-2. V. Tran, A. Karsai, M. Fong, Q. Yang, J. Yik, D. Haudenschild, G. Liu 4:40 COLL 648. Single molecule level studies of enzymeligand interactions using molecular recognition atomic force spectroscopy. T.I. Lansakara, H. Morris, P. Singh, A. Kohen, A.V. Tivanski 5:00 COLL 649. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of fluid supported lipid bilayers on silica-coated silver film over nanosphere structures. I. Bruzas, L. Sagle 5:20 Concluding Remarks.

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 153A

Toward Atomic Precision in Controlling the Low Dimensional Materials G. Chen, R. Jin, G. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 Introductory Remarks. 2:05 COLL 650. Near infrared electrochemiluminescence of Au nanoclusters: Solution sensing and surface assays. G. Wang, T. Wang, H. Ma, S. Chen 2:45 COLL 651. Luminescent group IB alloy metal nanoclusters with atomic precision. H. Yu, M. Zhu 3:25 Intermission. 3:55 COLL 652. Single molecule conductance of ferrocene on gold. M. Kamenetska 4:15 COLL 653. Discovery of biomaterials by simulation and experiment: Molecular recognition, assembly, applications. H. Heinz 4:45 COLL 654. Controlled dopant speciation of dopants in CdS-based nanoclusters. K.R. Kittilstved

SECTION C Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156C

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Characterization of Nanocatalysts H. Fan, J. He, Y. Sun, Organizers O. Chen, Presiding 2:00 COLL 655. Probing phase evolution of metal oxide nanomaterials in batteries. D. Su 2:30 COLL 656. Nano catalyst with enhanced activity and stability. T. Li 3:00 COLL 657. Watching single nanocrystal transformations with fluorescence microscopy. B. Sadtler, B. Yin 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 COLL 658. Partially poisoned Pd nanoparticles for selective hydrogenation and/or isomerization of olefins. M. Mahdaly, K.M. Vargas, Y. Shon 4:15 COLL 659. In-situ visualization of plasmon-induced hydrogenation reactions in individual palladium nanocubes. M. Vadai, D.K. Angell, F. Hayee, K. Sytwu, J.A. Dionne 4:35 COLL 660. Superiorly active and selective Au nanocatalysts supported on nitrided carbon for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction. L. Jin, B. Liu, P. Wang, H. Yao, L. Achola, P. Kerns, A. Lopes, Y. Yang, J. Ho, A. Moewes, Y. Pei, J. He

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Lipids, Peptides & Proteins R. Nagarajan, Organizer T. Wei, Presiding 2:00 COLL 663. Equilibrium and transport distributions of DNA in hydrophilic nanotubes. F. Cruz, J. Mota 2:20 COLL 664. Understanding and characterizing lipid bilayer dynamics by vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. A. Chowdhury, F. Liu, M. Phan, F. Heberle, J. Katsaras, C.P. Collier, Y. Ma, B. Doughty 2:40 COLL 665. Peptide-grafted gold nanoparticles studied with ReaxFF MD simulations. T. Wei 3:00 COLL 666. Bovine serum albumin protein surface properties in the presence of polymers or surfactants. A. Erfani, S. Khosharay, N.H. Flyn, J.D. Ramsey, C. Aichele 3:20 COLL 667. Adsorption orientation of amyloidogenic peptides over nano-gold colloidal particles’ surfaces. K. Yokoyama 3:40 COLL 668. Ionic strength-mediated phase transitions of surface-adsorbed DNA on single-walled carbon nanotubes. D. Salem, X. Gong, A. Liu, V. Koman, J. Dong, M. Strano 4:00 COLL 669. Flavin self-assemblies towards chiral enrichment of single-walled carbon nanotubes. E. Karunaratne, M. Mollahosseini, F. Papadimitrakopoulos 4:20 COLL 670. Effects of β-sitosteryl sulfate on the phase behavior and hydration properties of phospholipids. H. Sakai, K. Ananda, M. Akamatsu, K. Sakai, C. Kaise, T. Kaneko 4:40 COLL 671. Direct measurement of metal ion binding to ionophores in lipid bilayers by affinity chromatography. E.E. Ross 5:00 COLL 672. Entropy-driven self-assembly of protein 2D liquid crystal at solid-liquid interface. S. Zhang, H. Pyles, D. Baker, J.J. DeYoreo 5:20 COLL 673. Mechanistic investigation of methylene blue and heparin interaction in phosphate buffer saline. J. Wang, K. Humphries, B. Miller, J.V. Jokerst

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157B

Nanomaterials J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers A. Ivanisevic, Presiding 2:00 COLL 674. Dendritic effect and magnetic permeability in dendronized magnetic nanoparticles. J.D. Lee, D. Jishkariani, H. Yun, T. Paik, J.M. Kikkawa, C.R. Kagan, B. Donnio, C.B. Murray 2:20 COLL 675. Ligand-mediated near-infrared photoluminescence of small diameter copper, silver, and gold nanoparticles. S. Crawford, C.M. Andolina, A. Smith, K. Johnston, L. Marbella, P. Straney, J. Millstone 2:40 COLL 676. NHC-capped polymers for surface functionalization of metal nanoparticles in aqueous solution. S. Thanneeru, K. Ayers, M. Anuganti, L. Jin, L. Zhang, G. Ung, J. He 3:00 COLL 677. Surface modification of carbon-based material with terminal alkene ligands using radical coupling reactions. Y. Zhang, R.J. Hamers 3:20 COLL 678. Chiromagnetic nanoparticles and gels. J. Yeom, U. Santos, M. Chekini, M. Cha, A. de Moura, N. Kotov 3:40 COLL 679. Setting carriers free – healing faulty interfaces promotes delocalization and transport in nanocrystal solids. W. Walravens, N. Mahmoud, F. Geenen, E. Solano, J. Dendooven, A. Tadjine, C. Delerue, G. Roelkens, C. Detavernier, Z. Hens 4:00 COLL 680. Wavefunction engineering in CdSe/PbS core/shell heterostructures. B.M. Wieliczka, W.E. Buhro, R.A. Loomis 4:20 COLL 681. Colloidal synthesis and photophysical characterization of SiGeSn alloy quantum dots. E. Eladgham, U. Ozgur, D.O. Demchenko, I.U. Arachchige

4:40 COLL 682. Synthesis of quaternary Cu-ZnIn-S nanocrystals and photovoltaic characteristics. R.D. Rajapaksha, M.I. Ranasinghe 5:00 COLL 683. Kinetically controlled aggregation and growth, a pathway for synthesis simple-branched to hyperbranched NCs. M. Yazdanparast 5:20 COLL 684. Autonomous thermal-oxidative composition inversion (TOCI) and texture tuning in liquid metal particles. J. Cutinho, B.S. Chang, I.D. Tevis, M.M. Thuo

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 157C

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nano-Bio Interactions R. Nagarajan, Organizer T. Pons, Presiding 2:00 COLL 685. MnO2 and MoS2 nano-knives exhibit antibacterial properties. F. Alimohammadi, M. Sharifian Gh., N.H. Attanayake, A. Thenuwara, Y. Gogotsi, B. Anasori, D.R. Strongin 2:20 COLL 686. Time-gated fluorescence imaging and sensing using long lifetime near infrared quantum dots. M. Debayle, N. Lequeux, V. Loriette, a. Fragola, T. Pons 2:40 COLL 687. Glycosylated gold nanoparticle biosensors: Detection of toxins, bacteria and viruses. S. Richards, M.I. Gibson 3:00 COLL 688. Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization of synchronized cell populations. B.P. Coughlin, P.T. Lawrence, E.H. Sykes, C. Mace 3:20 COLL 689. Engineered nanozymes to catalyze sitespecific bioorthogonal reactions for imaging and therapeutic applications. R. Das, A. Gupta, G.Y. Tonga, R.F. Landis, T. Mizuhara, V.M. Rotello 3:40 COLL 690. Electric field sensitive upconverting nanoparticles: Toward background free in vivo action potential imaging. R. Mehlenbacher, C. Siefe, A. Lay, J.A. Dionne 4:00 COLL 691. Gold nanoparticle-polyplex electroporation in the enhancement of nucletic acid delivery. S. Huang, X. Liu, S. Wang 4:20 COLL 692. High content analysis (HCA) of nanoparticle uptake by mammalian cells and their effects on motility, proliferation and viability. A. Pallaoro, W.H. Dragowska, B.D. Gates, D.T. Yapp 4:40 COLL 693. UV-visible spectroscopy-based quantification of biomolecules bound to nanoparticles. B.L. Baldock, J.E. Hutchison 5:00 COLL 694. Understanding the interfacial events of stimuli responsive nanomaterials for the treatment of bacterial infection. D. Bagchi, S. Pal 5:20 COLL 695. Biodegradable nanocomposite antimicrobials for the eradication of multidrug-resistant bacterial biofilms without accumulated resistance. C. Li, R. Landis, A. Gupta, Y. Lee, J.M. Makabenta, M. Yazdani, N. Ngernyuang, I. Altinbasak, S. Mansoor, M. Khichi, A. Sanyal, V.M. Rotello

SECTION G Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Design Considerations Z. Gu, Z. Wang, J. Xie, Organizers G. Han, J. Zheng, Organizers, Presiding 2:00 COLL 696. Development of targeted nanomedicines via machine learning processes. D.A. Heller, Y. Shamay, J. Shah, M. Isik, J. Budhathoki-Uprety, D. Roxbury, R. Sridharan, J.D. Chodera, S.W. Lowe 2:30 COLL 697. Genetically encoded acousto-magnetic protein nanostructures for non-invasive imaging of cellular functions. G.J. Lu, A. Farhadi, J.O. Szablowski, A. LeeGosselin, S.R. Barnes, A. Lakshmanan, R.W. Bourdeau, M.G. Shapiro 3:00 COLL 698. Photothermal intracellular delivery using large-area Au nanodisk arrays fabricated by chemical lift-off lithography. C. Zhao, T. Man, X. Xu, Q. Yang, W. Liu, S.J. Jonas, M.A. Teitell, A.M. Andrews, P. Chiou, P.S. Weiss 3:20 COLL 699. Rapid sequential in situ multiplexing with DNA exchange imaging. P.L. Yin 3:50 COLL 700. Small platform enables big change – Nanotech-assisted discovery of novel biomarkers for disease diagnosis. T. Hu

4:20 COLL 701. Cartilage penetrating nanocarriers enhance drug delivery and efficacy in osteoarthritis. B. Geiger, S. Wang, R.F. Padera, A. Grodzinsky, P.T. Hammond 4:40 COLL 702. Magnetothermal neuormodulation in awake, freely moving animals. R. Munshi, S. Qadri, I. Castellanos-Rubio, A. Pralle 5:10 COLL 703. Tuning the scaffolding biionanofiber’s structure and surface for electrochemically sensing cancer and normal cells. Z.R. Tian, H. Alismail, Y. Du, J. Zhou, J. Koster, P. Cole, L. Mantooth 5:30 COLL 704. Design of quantum dot-protein bioconjugates for extracellular control of intracellular drug release. L.D. Field, S. Walper, K. Susumu, G. LasarteAragones, E. Oh, I. Medintz, J. Delehanty

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues K. Sakurai, Organizer M. A. Ilies, Organizer, Presiding 2:00 COLL 705. Functionalized thin shell microcapsule for targeted delivery and release. L. Zhang, J. Didier, H. Wang, D.A. Weitz 2:30 COLL 706. Encapsulation, protection and programmed release of retinol from silicone particles for topical applications. W. Shields, J.P. White, E.G. Osta, J. Patel, S. Rajkumar, S. Zauscher 3:00 COLL 707. Specific targeting of ovarian tumor associated macrophages by large, anionic nanoparticles. J.M. Berlin 3:30 Intermission. 3:45 COLL 708. Ligand design, synthesis and formulation for gold nanoparticle stabilization, targeting, drug loading and controlled release: towards new multi-ligand targeted nanoplatforms for doxorubicin delivery. U.K. Mondal, A. Shabana, M.R. Alam, T. Spoon, C.A. Ross, M. Muniswamy, C.T. Supuran, M.A. Ilies 4:15 COLL 709. Integration of inorganic nanomaterials within biological systems using a coordinating polymer coating. L. Du, W. Wang, Z. Jin, H.M. Mattoussi 4:45 COLL 710. Self-assembled fluorinated quantum dots as a novel delivery platform for enzymes. C. Carrillo Carrion, M. Carril, W. Parak

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160B

Surface Chemistry Self-Assembled Monolayers & Films S. L. Tait, Organizer M. S. Minkara, L. Xiang, Presiding 2:00 COLL 711. Preparation and quantification of various degrees of hydrophobic glass surfaces. S. Pradhan, P.K. Bikkina 2:20 COLL 712. Optical characterization of surface adlayers and their compositional demixing at the nanoscale. L. Xiang, M. Wojcik, S. Kenny, R. Yan, S. Moon, W. Li, K. Xu 2:40 COLL 713. Development of a self-assembled monolayer that is cleavable under mild conditions for surface-grafted conjugated polymers. P.M. Lundin 3:00 COLL 714. Chain-length dependent reactivity of thiolate self-assembled monolayers with atomic gas species. S. Brown, J. Sayler, S. Sibener 3:20 COLL 715. Probing curvature effects of surfactant adsorbing onto liquid/vapor interfaces of water using Monte Carlo simulations. M.S. Minkara, C.L. Venteicher, J.L. Chen, B. Xue, J.I. Siepmann 3:40 Intermission. 4:00 COLL 716. Electrochemistry and viscoelasticity of DNA self-assembled monolayers conjugated with hexammine metal(III) complexes: Effects of H/D isotope exchange. G. Flechsig, S.K. Galagedera 4:20 COLL 717. Antioxidant hydrogen-bonded films of synthetic polyphenol polymers. R. Hlushko, S.A. Sukhishvili 4:40 COLL 718. Influence of molecular weight on assembly and surface properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers. E. Towle, I. Ding, A.M. Peterson 5:00 COLL 719. Electrochemically triggered surface deposition of polyelectrolytes. M. Iqbal, W. Zhan 5:20 COLL 720. Hybrid glasses coatings obtained by electrospray deposition. L. Lei, M. Tenorio, K. Al-Marzoki, J. Guzman, L. Klein, A. Pelegri, J.P. Singer, A. Jitianu

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4:55 COLL 661. Plasmonic photocatalytic silver nanoparticles for hydrogenation and oxidation reactions. A. Gelle, M. Landry, A.H. Moores 5:15 COLL 662. Colloidal synthesis of noble metal nanostructures with unusual crystal phase. Y. Chen, Z. Fan, H. Zhang

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COLL/COMP Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

Molecular Interactions of Synthetic Nanoparticles with Membranes Sponsored by ANYL, Cosponsored by COLL and PHYS

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Spectroscopy Analysis Sponsored by ENFL, Cosponsored by ANYL and COLL

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials Applied Surface & Coating Research Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

THURSDAY MORNING SECTION A Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 104B

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Colloidal Systems R. Nagarajan, Organizer K. Sasan, Presiding 8:30 COLL 721. High yield synthesis of semiconductor helices through self-assembly of CdTe nanoparticles. J. Yan, J. Kim, W. Feng, N. Kotov 8:50 COLL 722. Universal fluorescence enhancement substrate based on multiple heterostructure colloidal photonic crystal with super-wide stopband and highly sensitive Cr(VI) detecting performance. L. Zhang 9:10 COLL 723. Structural synergy of shell conformation in p-n heterostructured water-processable semiconducting colloids for ultra-fast and long-term quenching efficiency. Y. Kim 9:30 COLL 724. Dual self-assembly of chiromagnetic cobaltbased supraparticles with rice-like structure. Z. Mu, N. Kotov 9:50 COLL 725. Adsorption of rhamnolipid biosurfactant and its effect on the aggregation kinetics of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in monovalent and divalent electrolyte solutions. A. Ghosh, N. Sharma, W. Li, J. Fortner 10:10 COLL 726. Developing 3D-printed optical glasses from sol-gel feedstocks. K. Sasan, J.F. Destino, N. Dudukovic, M.A. Johnson, D.T. Nguyen, T.D. Yee, L.L. Wong, A. Lange, T.M. Fears, P. Ehrmann, R. Dylla-Spears 10:30 COLL 727. Study of the phase state and viscoelastic properties of individual substrate deposited model aerosol systems by atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy. K.K. Ray, H. Lee, A.V. Tivanski 10:50 COLL 728. Determination of zeta potential in high ionic strength aqueous colloidal dispersions using next generation electrophoretic light scattering (NG-ELS). J. Miller 11:10 COLL 729. Characterization of fluorocarbon surfactant solutions for understanding fire suppression enhancement with solvent incorporation. S.L. Giles, A. Snow, K.M. Hinnant, R. Ananth 11:30 COLL 730. Spectroscopic investigations of AuxPdy bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO2. X. Yu, A. Nefedov, C. Woell, Y. Wang 11:50 COLL 731. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of amphiphilic quaternary ammonium chitosans/sodium alginate as a biocompatible anti-biofouling coating. J. Jung, Y. Sun 12:10 COLL 732. Synthesis and characterisation of silicon germanium oxide (Si0.5Ge0.5O2) nanoparticles via liquid mix and sol-gel techniques. G.B. Teh, T. Lim, S. Ganesan, R.D. Tilley

SECTION B Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 258A

Toward Atomic Precision in Controlling the Low Dimensional Materials G. Chen, R. Jin, G. Wang, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COLL 733. Selective distribution of hom*o-LUMO in gold nanoclusters. Z. Wu 9:15 COLL 734. Understanding and prediction of the structures of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters using electron counting rule. Y. Gao, W. Xu, X.C. Zeng 9:55 COLL 735. Modulating the hierarchical fibrous assembly of Au nanoparticles with atomic precision. Q. Li, R. Jin

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10:15 Intermission. 10:45 COLL 736. Kinetic control of the seed-mediated growth of gold nanorods. G. Chen, R. Gallagher, X. Zhang 11:25 COLL 737. Hierarchical nanostructures through prescribed structural symmetry breaking. T.J. Kempa, B. Stephens, A. Kossak, M. Sliwa, T. Chowdhury 11:45 COLL 738. DNA-templated silver clusters. J.T. Petty, D. Chevrier, P. Zhang, T. Yeh, R. Dickson

11:50 COLL 756. Dynamics and mechanism of polyelectrolyte-neutral block copolymer micellization in aqueous solution by explicit atomistic MD simulations. R. Chockalingam, U. Natarajan

SECTION C

J. A. Hollingsworth, R. Nagarajan, Organizers J. Wang, Presiding 8:30 COLL 757. Layer-by-layer growth of DNAfunctionalized nanoparticle thin films with tailored surface architectures. D. Lewis, P. Gabrys, R. Macfarlane 8:50 COLL 758. Self assembly of polymer coated Au nanocrystals with controlled polymer grafting density. H. Yun, Y. Lee, J. Kim, J. Han, G. Stein, B. Kim 9:10 COLL 759. Multiscale modeling of DNAwrapped carbon nanotube nanosensors. L. Vukovic, A. Alizadehmojarad 9:30 COLL 760. Hybrid conjugated oligomer/polymer-metal nanoparticles. D. Tuncel 9:50 COLL 761. Directed organization of giant quantum dots (gQDs) during polymerization of ionic liquid (IL) crystalline mesophases. A. Joshi, H. Magurudeniya, C.J. Hanson, J.A. Hollingsworth, M.A. Firestone 10:10 COLL 762. Open circuit chemical corrosion drives porosity evolution of 3D bicontinuous nanoporous precious metal structures: In situ and real time kinetic study via synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering. A.A. Farghaly, M.M. Collinson, B. Lee, S. Seifert, K. Suthar 10:50 COLL 763. “Soft” epitaxy in DNA-nanoparticle thin films. P. Gabrys, R. Macfarlane 11:10 COLL 764. Influence of chain architecture on transport properties in polyelectrolyte functionalized mesopores. R. Brilmayer, A. Andrieu-Brunsen 11:30 COLL 765. Building up AuPd@m-SiO2 nanocatalyst with alloyed noble metal core and mesoporous silica shell structure: Designed composite for enhanced p-chloronitrobenzene hydrogenation selectivity. H. Yin, S. Zhou, G. Yang

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 257B

Frontiers & Challenges in Nanoparticle-Mediated Chemical Transformations Nanocatalyst-Mediated Reactions H. Fan, J. He, Y. Sun, Organizers L. Jin, Presiding 8:30 COLL 739. Synthesis of hierarchical 4H/fcc Ru nanostructures for highly efficient hydrogen evolution in alkaline media. Q. Yun, Q. Lu, A. Wang, H. Zhang 8:50 COLL 740. Single-walled carbon nanotube mediated in situ electrochemistry. A.T. Liu, Y. Kunai, A. Cottrill, M. Strano 9:10 COLL 741. In-situ observation of plasmon-driven hydrogenation reactions within Au@Pd core-shell nanoparticles. K. Sytwu, M. Vadai, F. hayee, A. Koh, R. Sinclair, J.A. Dionne 9:30 COLL 742. Investigations of plasmonic enhancement for small molecule oxidation using gold nanoparticle decorated semiconductor heterostructures. J. Boltersdorf, G. Forcherio, J. McClure, D. Baker, A. Leff, C.A. Lundgren 9:50 Intermission. 10:05 COLL 743. Solvent mixing to induce aggregation: Applications to control molecular motor behavior. Y. Wei, B. Feringa 10:25 COLL 744. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptide conformations and interactions with gold nanoparticles. P. Rehak 10:45 COLL 745. Plasmonic hot-carriers mediated tunable photochemical reactions: A non-adiabatic molecular dynamics study of H2 splitting. Y. Zhang, S. Tretiak, T. Nelson, H. Guo, G.C. Schatz

SECTION D Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 259A

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Polymers & Gels R. Nagarajan, Organizer P. D’Angelo, Presiding 8:30 COLL 746. Engineering the shape of non-crosslinked poly(styrene) particles. M. Liu, X. Zheng, F. Dong, M.D. Ward, M. Weck 8:50 COLL 747. Structure-property relationship in particle brush materials. J. Lee, Z. Wang, T. Deng, R. Davis, K. Matyjaszewski, M.R. Bockstaller 9:10 COLL 748. Improvement of personal thermal management by electrically conductive silver nanowirehydrogel textile coatings. P. D’Angelo, E.S. Hirst, J. Lum 9:30 COLL 749. Synthesis of functional particles by condensation and polymerization of monomer droplets in silicone oils. P. Karandikar, M. Gupta 9:50 COLL 750. Revisiting the colloidal fundamentals of water-dispersible polyesters: Interactions and self-assembly of polymer nanoaggregates in water. S. Islam, O.D. Velev 10:10 COLL 751. Green synthesis of polyrhodanine microspheres and its application for the adsorption of organic dye. M. Chauhan, A. Gaba, Y. Saleh, Q.R. Johnson, G. Longia, B.P. Chauhan 10:30 COLL 752. Soft-templating of ultra-large pores using block bottlebrush copolymer via a cooperative assembly approach. X. Xia, G. Bass, M. Becker, B.D. Vogt 10:50 COLL 753. Elucidating the effects of metalcomplexation on morphological and rheological properties of polymer solutions by a dissipative particle dynamics model. A. Vishnyakov, S. Kolattukudy Poulose, A.V. Neimark 11:10 COLL 754. Impact of amine rich polyelectrolyte coating chain length on AuNP-Liposome interaction. Z. Zheng, Z. Rosenzweig 11:30 COLL 755. Comparison of structure-property relationship of molecular gels prepared from simply structured alkanoic acid derivatives as efficient ambidextrous gelators. A.V. Mallia, K. Galinat, C. Dill

SECTION E Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 259B

Nanomaterials

SECTION F Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 105

Basic Research in Colloids, Surfactants & Nanomaterials Nano-Bio Interactions R. Nagarajan, Organizer L. Boselli, Presiding 8:30 COLL 766. Synergistic antimicrobial therapy using nanoparticles and antibiotics for the treatment of multidrugresistant bacterial infection. A. Gupta, N.M. Saleh, R. Das, R.F. Landis, A. Bigdeli, M. Mahmoudi, V.M. Rotello 8:50 COLL 767. Interactions between gold nanoparticles and lipid membranes: The effect of the liquid flow. C. Molinaro, F. Cecchet 9:10 COLL 768. Bionano interactions of ultrasmall nanoparticles: What the cell sees in this size regime. L. Boselli, E. Polo, V. Castagnola, F. Muraca, K. Dawson 9:30 COLL 769. Modifying the interactions between semiconductor quantum dots and bacterial targets. D.N. Williams, Z. Zheng, S. Pramanik, C.L. Haynes, Z. Rosenzweig 9:50 COLL 770. Elucidating biomolecular corona role for nanoparticle interactions. E. Polo 10:10 COLL 771. β-amyloid detection in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease using glyconanoparticle. S. HossainiNasr 10:30 COLL 772. Small-angle scattering of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) as medical devices with reduced risk of infection. G. Smith, E. Brok, M. Schmiele, L. Arleth, K. Mortensen, M. Alm, P. Thomsen 10:50 COLL 773. Correlating structural and functional heterogeneity of immobilized enzymes. D.F. Kienle, R. Falatach, J. Kaar, D.K. Schwartz 11:10 COLL 774. Self-assembly of nanoparticle-protein superstructures for the direct cytosolic protein delivery to lymphoma B cells. Y. Liu, X. Zhang, M. Ray, D. Luther, V.M. Rotello 11:30 COLL 775. Layer-by-layer nanoparticles for the detection and treatment of ovarian cancer. N. Boehnke, S. Correa, L. Hao, W. Wang, S. Bhatia, P.T. Hammond 11:50 COLL 776. Screening for canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) by SERS-based quantitative urine cytology. A. Pallaoro, R.Y. Mirsafavi, W.T. Culp, G.B. Braun, C.D. Meinhart, M. Moskovits

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 252B

Nanomedicines: From Fundamentals to Applications Young Scientists & the Future Z. Gu, Z. Wang, J. Xie, J. Zheng, Organizers G. Han, Organizer, Presiding M. Yu, Presiding 8:30 COLL 777. Physiological stability and renal clearance of ultrasmall zwitterionic gold nanoparticles: Ligand length matters. X. Ning 8:50 COLL 778. Reinforcement of polymeric nanoassemblies for ultra-high drug loadings, modulation of stiffness and release kinetics, and sustained therapeutic efficacy. I. Ekladious, R. Liu, N. Varongchayakul, L.A. Mejia Cruz, D. Todd, H. Zhang, N.H. Oberlies, R.F. Padera, Y.L. Colson, M.W. Grinstaff 9:10 COLL 779. Co-aggregation of multiple drugs for chemotherapeutic delivery. E. Donders, A.N. Ganesh, B. Shoichet, M.S. Shoichet 9:30 COLL 780. Cationized albumin carrier for potential synergistic chemotherapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. S. Lu, J. Rahmat, R. Mahendran, E. Kang, E. Chiong, K. Neoh 9:50 COLL 781. Sequential co-delivery of EGFR inhibitor and doxorubicin for targeted combination chemotherapy. J. Lee, Z. Zhou, M. Jafari, V. Sriram 10:10 COLL 782. Highly engineered platinum nanoparticles as multifunctional active nanocarriers integrating the function of high-performance antioxidant drugs. M. Moglianetti 10:30 COLL 783. Fast releasing oral formulation of clofazimine nanoparticles prepared via flash nanoprecipitation as anti-cryptosporidiosis therapeutics. Y. Zhang, J. Feng, S. McManus, K. Ristroph, R.K. Prudhomme 10:50 COLL 784. Solid drug nanoparticles synthesised using spontaneous nanoprecipitation of tenofovir disoproxil fumerate: From proof of concept to in vivo pharmaco*kinetics of improved oral dosage. J.J. Hobson, P. Curley, A. Al-khouja, M. Siccardi, C. Flexner, C.L. Meyers, A. Owen, S. Rannard 11:10 COLL 785. Polymersomes based on temperaturesensitive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) for anticancer therapy. V.A. Kozlovskaya, A. Alford, E.P. Kharlampieva 11:30 COLL 786. Hybrid viral/nonviral gene carriers for molecularly targeted, versatile cancer therapy. M. Lugin, K. Kelada, A. Fleischman, Y.J. Kwon 11:50 COLL 787. Cellulose-based photonic nanomaterials for biomedical imaging. B. Peng, M. Almeqdadi, F. Laroche, S. Palantavida, S. Peerzade, M. Dokukin, J. Roper, H. Feng, I. Sokolov 12:10 COLL 788. Biodegradable periodic shRNA systems for enhanced gene silencing. C. Wu, J. Li, W. Wang, P.T. Hammond

SECTION H Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 160A

Surface Chemistry Non-Metal Surface Chemistry S. L. Tait, Organizer A. Holm, C. E. Mohler, Presiding 8:30 COLL 795. Ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy studies on HOPG exfoliations in ambient air and ultra-high vacuum. M. Salim, M. Montgomery, H. Liu 8:50 COLL 796. Inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction for surface modification of sp2 hybridized carbon nanomaterials. J. Zhu, R. Lennox 9:10 COLL 797. Applying imaging XPS towards understanding surface phenomena of 2D-like and nano-material structures. J.M. Gorham, W.A. Osborn, J. Woodco*ck, K.C. Scott, J.M. Heddleston, A.R. Hight Walker, J. Gilman, F. DelRio, M.R. Amer, A. Alrasheed, S.A. Alodan, K. Chung 9:30 COLL 798. Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of graphene oxide — identifying Marangoni flow as a process that fundamentally limits deposition control. A. Holm, C.J. Wrasman, A.R. Riscoe, M. Cargnello, C.W. Frank 9:50 Intermission. 10:10 COLL 799. Surface complexation modeling of calcite zeta potential in mixed brines with varied ionic strength for carbonate wettability characterization. J. Song, Y. Zeng, X. Duan, M. Puerto, G.J. Hirasaki, S.L. Biswal 10:30 COLL 800. Molecular and dissociative adsorption of DMMP, Sarin and Soman on dry and wet TiO2(110) using density functional theory. Y.P. Cardona-Quintero, R. Nagarajan 10:50 COLL 801. Adsorption of high molecular weight polymers on clay surfaces. C.E. Mohler, M. Poindexter, G. Meyers, C. Reinhardt, A.I. Nakatani 11:10 COLL 802. Vibrational SFG of thermally treated clay minerals. A.E. Nessl, A. Montenegro, E. Howard, M. Mammetkuliyev, B.C. Melot, A.V. Benderskii

Functional Materials from Biopolymer Self-Assembly & Self-Organization Sponsored by CELL, Cosponsored by CARB, COLL, ENVR and POLY

Peter Derrick Memorial Symposium: Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Nanomaterials & Safe Evaluation Sponsored by ENFL, Cosponsored by ANYL and COLL

Surface, Interface & Coating Materials New Developments in Coating Industry Sponsored by PMSE, Cosponsored by COLL and POLY

COMP

Synthetic Self-Assembled Systems for Drug & Nucleic Acid Delivery: New Materials, Formulation Strategies, Targeting, Toxicity & Regulatory Issues

Division of Computers in Chemistry

M. A. Ilies, Organizer K. Sakurai, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 COLL 789. Size characterization of micelles and microemulsions by Taylor dispersion analysis. V. Jannin, H. Cottet 9:00 COLL 790. Polymeric micelles for therapeutic delivery of hydrogen sulfide. U. Hasegawa, A. van der Vlies, J.J. Chen 9:30 COLL 791. Complexation loading of antimicrobial peptides into microgel-modified surfaces. J. Liang, M. Libera 10:00 Intermission. 10:15 COLL 792. Novel, self-assembled PLGA-PEG-PLGA nanogels, ultilizing multiple non-covalent interactions for the extended and controlled release of nucleic acid conjugates to treat secondary cataracts. L.L. Osorno, R. Getts, M. GeorgeWeinstein, M. Byrne 10:45 COLL 793. Yeast β-glucan functionalized graphene oxide for targeted delivery of CpG ODNs and enhanced cancer immunotherapy. H. Zhang, J. Chen 11:15 COLL 794. Time-lapse live cell imaging to monitor doxorubicin release from DNA origami nanostructures. R. Wang, Y. Zeng, J. Liu, S. Yang, W. Liu, L. Xu

H. Woodco*ck, J. Shen and M. Feig, Program Chairs

SECTION I Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Room 156A

SUNDAY MORNING SECTION A Westin Boston Waterfront Adams

Material Science C. M. Aikens, Organizer M. Pardakhti, Presiding 8:30 COMP 1. Extended Hückel calculations on solids using the Avogadro molecular editor and visualizer. P. Avery, H. Ludowieg, J. Autschbach, E. Zurek 8:55 COMP 2. Unusual electronic properties of phosphorene and template-directed porphyrin nanotubes: New insights from large-scale DFT calculations. B.M. Wong, S.I. Allec, N.V. Ilawe 9:20 COMP 3. Semiempirical modeling of plasmonic Ag nanoclusters and the chemical mechanism in surfaceenhanced Raman scattering. R. Gieseking, M.A. Ratner, G.C. Schatz 9:45 COMP 4. Real-time simulation of photoinduced molecular spin-plasmon dynamics. C.T. Chapman 10:10 Intermission.

10:30 COMP 5. Auger recombination in CdSe nanocrystals: Excitonic effects and non-volume scaling in nanorods. J.P. Philbin, E. Rabani 10:55 COMP 6. Development of geminal-screened electronhole interaction kernel method for calculation of excitonic properties in colloidal quantum dots. P. McLaughlin, J. Scher, M. Bayne, A. Chakraborty 11:20 COMP 7. Boost small polaron transport in transition metal oxides by atomic doping. Y. Ping

SECTION B Westin Boston Waterfront Faneuil

Recent Advances in DFT & TDDFT: Theory & Simulations N. Govind, K. Lopata, Organizers C. Huang, Organizer, Presiding 8:30 Introductory Remarks. 8:35 COMP 8. Localized orbital scaling correction for systematic elimination of delocalization and static/strong correlation error in density functional approximations. W. Yang 9:05 COMP 9. Tuned quantification of particle-hole distance in charge-transfer excitations: A revised version of the DCT index. M. Campetella, A. Perfetto, I. Ciofini 9:20 COMP 10. Accurate f*ckui functions of finite systems by orbital-free DFT. M. Pavanello 9:50 COMP 11. Energetics and band-gap engineering in heterojunction solar cells and graphene/fluorographene interfaces. S. Das, B. Barbiellini, P. Somasundaran, V. Renugopalakrishnan 10:05 COMP 12. Recovering exact conditions at semi-local DFT cost to mitigate energy and density errors for transition metal chemistry. H.J. Kulik 10:35 Intermission. 10:50 COMP 13. DFT-based embedding theories: Wavefunction-embedding, dynamics, excited states, and applications. T.F. Miller 11:20 COMP 14. Correcting DFT errors through v-representable density partitioning. P. de Silva, T. Zhu, T.A. Van Voorhis 11:35 COMP 15. Density functional theory of molecular fragments. A. Wasserman 12:05 COMP 16. Exploring new density-functional embedding techniques for strongly correlated electrons: From model to ab initio Hamiltonians. B. Senjean, N. Nakatani, M. Tsuchiizu, E. Fromager

SECTION C Westin Boston Waterfront Alcott

COMP Meets CRYO: New Frontiers in Flexible Fitting, Image Processing & Refinement of Cryo-EM Data G. Palermo, M. Feig, Organizers, Presiding 8:30 COMP 17. Inclusion of Cryo-EM data in flexible protein-protein docking. M. Zacharias 9:10 COMP 18. Computational tools to characterize structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems from single molecule experiments. F. Tama 9:50 COMP 19. Development of the flexible-fitting MD simulation method for cryo-EM images of large macromolecular structures and dynamics. Y. Sugita, T. Mori 10:30 Intermission. 11:00 COMP 20. Emerging unified description of transcription initiation from cryo-EM and integrative computational modeling. C. Yan, Y. He, I.N. Ivanov 11:40 COMP 21. Cryo-EM structure determination of large RNAs. N. Toor

SECTION D Westin Boston Waterfront Douglass

Membrane Protein Simulations & Free Energy Approaches Receptors & Force Field N. K. Banavali, W. Im, Organizers Y. L. Luo, Organizer, Presiding C. N. Rowley, Presiding 8:30 COMP 22. Computational study of allosteric regulation of type 1 serine/threonine kinase receptors. Y.L. Luo, W. Botello-Smith, A. Alsamarah, P. Chatterjee, C. Xie, J. Lacroix, J. Hao 8:55 COMP 23. Binding to glutamate receptors: Follow the yellow brick road. A. Yu, H. Salazar, A. Plested, A. Lau

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SECTION G

TECHNICAL PROGRAM

COMP 9:20 COMP 24. Molecular basis of stress-related a Class B GPCR using multiscale modeling. C. Liao, J. Li, M. Brewer, V. May 9:45 COMP 25. Binding modes and effects of allosteric drug leads in the Adenosine A1 receptor. Y. Miao, A. Bhattarai, A.T. Nguyen, L.T. May, A. Christopoulos 10:10 Intermission. 10:30 COMP 26. Development and application of a polarizable force field based on the classical drude oscillator. A.D. Mackerell 10:55 COMP 27. Molecular mechanical force fields with higher-order dispersion terms using the exchange-hole dipole moment model. C.N. Rowley, E.R. Johnson, M. Mohebifar, E. Walters 11:20 COMP 28. Achieving a high level of accuracy in modeling protein-ligand binding. E. Harder, C. Wu, W. Damm, A. Roos, M. Reboul, J. Stevenson, R. Abel

SECTION E Westin Boston Waterfront Paine

Computational Studies of Water D. J. Sindhikara, Organizer Y. Jin, Presiding 8:30 COMP 29. Thermodynamic anomalies in deeply stretched water. R.S. Singh, Y. Altabet, F. Stillinger, P.G. Debenedetti 8:45 COMP 30. Molecular dynamics study of TMAO and urea aqueous solutions. X. Teng, T. Ichiye 9:00 COMP 31. SSTMap: A computational tool creating solvation thermodynamic and structural maps from molecular dynamics trajectories. S. Ramsey, K. Haider, A. Cruz, M.K. Gilson, T.P. Kurtzman 9:15 COMP 32. Elucidating molecular motions of water using three-state transition matrices of hydrogen bond network patterns. L. Edens, T. Zhou, T. Markland, A.E. Clark 9:30 COMP 33. Accelerating the 3D-RISM implicit solvent model using treecode and multigrid methods. L. Wilson, G. Limon, R. Kransy, T. Luchko 9:55 COMP 34. Incorporating solvation thermodynamic mapping into docking. T.E. Balius, M. Fischer, M.K. Gilson, B. Shoichet, T.P. Kurtzman 10:20 Intermission. 10:35 COMP 35. Using range-separated hybrids for better electron vertical detachment energies in water cluster anions. C. Zho, V. Vlcek, D. Neuhauser, B.J. Schwartz 10:50 COMP 36. Modeling hydration, one water molecule at a time. P. Bajaj, M. Riera, A.W. Goetz, D.R. Moberg, F. Paesani 11:15 COMP 37. Theoretical description of the polarization dependence of vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy at the water/vapor interface. P.B. Moore, B. Space 11:40 COMP 38. Pursuing the ab initio complete basis set limit for the harmonic vibrational frequencies of explicitly solvated halide and pseudo-halide ions. G.S. Tschumper 12:05 COMP 39. Physics of the anomalous diffusion coefficients of monovalent ions in water. C. Dharmawardhana, Q. Huang, X. Teng, A.C. Simmonett, J.M. Rodgers, T. Ichiye 12:20 COMP 40. Structure and exchange kinetics of water at xenotime mineral interface: An application to beneficiation of rare earth elements. S. Roy, S. Goverapet Srinivasan, V. Bryantsev

2:20 COMP 43. Predicting ternary phase diagrams from molecular simulations. J. McDonagh, M.A. Johnston, W.C. Swope, R.L. Anderson, E. Pyzer-Knapp, D. Bray 2:45 COMP 44. COSMOplex: A completely new paradigm for the self-consistent simulation of self-organizing liquid systems. A. Klamt, T. Gaudin, J. Schwöbel, U. Huniar 3:10 COMP 45. Free-energy predictions of self-assembling polymers through nanoscale simulations. A. Pietropaolo 3:35 Intermission. 3:50 COMP 46. Development and testing of a dissipative particle dynamics force field for nonionic surfactants derived using experimental micellar property data. W.C. Swope, A. Duff, M.A. Johnston, R.L. Anderson 4:15 COMP 47. Visualizing and quantifying structural ordering underlying static structure factor peaks from molecular dynamics simulations of ionic liquids. R.A. Wheeler, T. Mackoy, R.A. Richardson 4:40 COMP 48. Bottom-up coarse-graining of polyelectrolyte-coated gold nanoparticles. G. Chong, R. Hernandez 5:05 COMP 49. Toward the computational design of nanoreceptors with intelligent recognition abilities. L. Riccardi, F. Rastrelli, F. Mancin, M. Devivo

1:30 COMP 64. Insights from molecular simulations of the ion-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NQR). W. Menzer, C. Li, O. Juarez, D.D. Minh 1:55 COMP 65. Conformational changes between E1P to E2P states of SERCA by MD simulations based on string method and free-energy calculations. Y. Sugita, C. Kobayashi 2:20 COMP 66. Characterization of the dynamics in the central binding site and the extracellular vestibule of the serotonin transporter reveals new ligand discovery opportunities. A. Abramyan, L. Shi 2:45 COMP 67. Cation-specific modulations in the interacting allosteric network in LeuT binding pocket. S. Noskov 3:10 Intermission. 3:30 COMP 68. Atomistic string method solution for ion channel gating and modulation by general anesthetics. B. Lev, S. Murail, F. Poitevin, B. Cromer, M. Baaden, M. Delarue, T.W. Allen 3:55 COMP 69. Gating and modulation of inward rectifier potassium channels. V. Jogini, D.E. Shaw 4:20 COMP 70. Regulation of ion permeation in K channels: From kinetic models to atomistic simulations and back. S. Bernèche

SECTION B

SECTION E

Westin Boston Waterfront Faneuil

Westin Boston Waterfront Paine

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